(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Town of Wilmington Annual Report"

yawn cfl ^idnvwMjptcvi 



J 730 - -4980 




4980 




Ju iftemoriam 

John M. Amaro 
George A. Anderson 
Dr. Antonia S. Bayog 
Ernest J. Cail 
George M. A. Webber 



Cover picture: 



U. S. Marine Color Guard 

250th Anniversary Parade - September 7, 



Table of Contents 



Title Page 

Accepted Streets 81 

Board of Appeals 49 

Board of Assessors 12 

Board of Health 29 

Board of Registrars 18 

Board of Selectmen 2 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 7 

Carter (Sarah D.J.) Lecture Fund 62 

Cemetery Department 26 

Conservation Commission 61 

Constable 18 

Council on Aging 63 

Directory of Officials 6 

Dog Officer 17 

Fire Department 22 

Highway Department 35 

Historical Commission 40 

Housing Authority 78 

Housing Rehabilitation Program 79 

Inspector of Buildings 28 

Library Director 42 

Library Trustees 41 

Planning Board 34 

Police Department 20 

Public Buildings Department 27 

Recreation Commission 36 

Redevelopment Authority 19 

Revenue Sharing 133 

School Committee , 64 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 62 

Shawsheen Valley Technical School 75 

Superintendent of Schools .' 67 

Town Accountant 128 

Town Clerk 16 

Town Collector 14 

Town Counsel 44 

Town Engineer 19 

Town Manager 4 

Town Meetings Presidential Primary - March 4, 1980 86 

Annual Town Election - April 19, 1980 88 

Special Town Meeting - April 26, 1980 90 

Annual Town Meeting - April 26, 1980 90 

Special Town Meeting - June 9, 1980 Ill 

State Primary - September 16, 1980 113 

Special Town Meeting - September 22, 1980 115 

State Election - November 4, 1980 116 

Special Town Meeting - December 8, 1980 121 

Town Treasurer 15 

Tree Department 23 

250th Anniversary Committee 11 

Veterans' Agent 33 

Water & Sewer Department 24 

1 




Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts 

board of selectmen 

To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

The year 1980 marked the 250th anniversary of the incorporation of the Town of 
Wilmington. The Board of Selectmen appointed the 250th Anniversary Committee 
to organize a year of celebrations. The 250th Anniversary Committee used the 
international "Year of the Family" theme and developed their own slogan, "We're 
Doing It In Wilmington." Their festivities brought together families, friends 
and neighbors to commemorate the Town's anniversary in an extravaganza of acti- 
vities that entertained us all from January to November. 

The Anniversary Ball in January began the year's festivities. It brought toget- 
her over 900 Wilmingtonltes for an evening of reunions. Some of the people in 
attendance had not seen one another in over twenty-five years! 

The Fourth of July Celebration was a joint project organized by the 250th Anni- 
versary Committee and the Town's Recreation Commission. These two groups joined 
forces to present the Town's people with a three-day festival. There were con- 
certs on the common, fireworks at night, chicken dinners, pancake breakfasts, 
contests, games, carnival rides and a quadrathon. 

On September 7th the Town hosted a three-hour parade made up of local groups, 
marching bands, antique fire apparatus and automobiles, and local celebrities. 

September 25th, the actual date of the Town's incorporation, was celebrated bv 
an evening ecumenical service and the burial of a time capsule on the common. 
The Wilmington Minutemen assisted in dignifying this historic event. 

The final event of the year was the Awards Night where we enjoyed the afterglow 
of a years worth of celebrating. 

During 1980 there were other events that require special notice. The following 
are some of the year's highlights: 

The Recreation Department met with continued support for their youth and adult 
programs. The summer program for handicapped children held at Camp 40 Acres 
experienced a 30% increase in the number of campers. The Recreational Basket- 
ball League had nearly 500 boys and girls participating in this popular pro- 
gram. Santa's Workshop held in the old library was a big hit with young and 
old alike. 

The preliminary 1980 Federal Census figure of 17,495 is being challenged by the 
Board of Registrars. They estimate the census is closer to 18,000. 

The State Department of Public Works provided the funds for the construction 
of a salt shed to protect the Town's environment and water supply. 

The Annual Town Meeting appropriated funds for the enlargements of culverts at 
Federal and Woburn Streets. The work was completed by Town forces during the 
fall. 

The Neighborhood Rehabilitation Program was started with a $245,000 grant from 
HUD. This will assist low and moderate income families in the Silver Lake 
area in the rehabilitation of their homes. 



2 



The construction of both the sewer project and the water treatment made signifi- 
cant headway during 1980. The sewer project is nearly completed in the Silver 
Lake area. The water treatment plant is scheduled to begin operation in the 
spring of 1981. 

The Police Department saw the introduction of the Auxiliary Police and the Crime 
Prevention Program. Both functions will assist the department in providing the 
best possible police protection for the Town. 

The Citizens Advisory Committee on Hazardous Waste was formed during 1980 to 
address the hazardous toxic waste problem in the North Woburn industrial area. 
The Committee has been successful in its efforts to insure that the problem is 
contained on-site without threatening the surrounding areas. 

Last year was a busy year for industrial and commercial construction. On 
Ballardvale Street, the Tambone Corporation finished several buildings and the 
Compugraphic Corporation opened its new four-story office building. On Lowell 
Street, Stelio's Restaurant reopened after their fire in 1979 and the Avco 
Office Building is nearly completed. On Eames Street, Thermo Electron built a 
new plant. These new buildings mean greater employment opportunities for our 
residents. 

At the Annual Town Meeting the voters decided to override the state's 4% tax 
cap by six tenths of one percent. The final tax rate was set at $80.55 up 
4.6% from the previous year's rate of $77.00. 

Finally, it must be noted that Selectman James F. Banda retired from public 
life after twenty years of service as a Town official. 

We, the members of the Board of Selectmen, want to take this opportunity to 
thank all of you for your continued support. You show it by volunteering your 
time and energy in our many boards and commissions. You show it by attending 
our Town Meetings, our Selectmen's Meetings and other special functions. And 
especially, you show it by exercising your God given right at the polling place. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Aldo A. Caira 
A. John Imbimbo 
Rocco V. DePasquale 
Daniel H. Ballou, Jr. 




3 



Town op Wilmington 

MASSACHUSETTS 01887 



OFFICE OF THE aria coot 617 

TOWN MANAGER CSS 3311 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Wilmington: 

Metropolitan Boston's northwestern communities are rapidly becoming among one of 
the largest and most dynamic industrial centers in the East. The Town of Wilmington 
continued to experience this growth during 1980 which was a goal of this adminis- 
tration to encourage industrial expansion on industrially zoned land. This growth 
is of great financial value to the homeowner because it adds dollars to our tax- 
able income and, perhaps as importantly, adds job opportunities for our people. 

The Nation, Commonwealth, and our Town still suffer, however, from the pressures 
of inflation. This phenomenon results in staggering increases in cost to both 
the homeowner and our municipal government in almost all areas of services and 
consumer goods. We have also experienced a reduction in income from state and 
federal sources which, when coupled with inflation, caused the layoff of some 
employees during 1980. 

During this past year we all witnessed the sharp increase in the cost of energy, 
which is tied to the cost of fuel oil. One of my neighbors indicated to me last 
week that the cost of electricity in his home has averaged $40.00 per month for 
the kilowatt hours consumed. The actual electric bill, however, now amounts to 
$102.00 per month which includes the surcharge for fuel oil which has been added 
to the bill. 

A Special Town Meeting was held on September 22, 1980, to ratify and confirm the 
action of a previous Special Town Meeting on June 9, 1980. At that meeting, the 
Town was authorized to receive State and Federal aid in addition to any borrowing 
that might be necessary to construct the Town's sewer system. 

At the Special Town Meeting held on December 8, 1980, the voters approved a char- 
ter amendment to allow for the recall of elected Town officers, but this vote was 
nullified because the Attorney General found fault with specific language. Also, 
the sum of $200,000 was approved for the revaluation of all property in Town. 

At that same meeting, the voters directed the Wilmington Housing Authority not to 
accept 80 units of elderly housing and 25 units of low and moderate income family 
housing. This decision was detrimental to the Town's pre-application for an addi- 
tional $400,000 of HUD-Small Cities funds. A short time after the meeting, the 
Town's pre-application was returned because we did not accept the low and moderate 
income housing into the Town. 

In 1967 the total budget for schools and general government was reported to be 
$3,351,621.00 as the amount to be raised by the tax rate and tax levy with a total 



4 



valuation in property of $98,283,010.00. As you know, the current tax rate and 
levy is $12,680,000.00 with a total current equalized property valuation of 
$425,897,000.00. 

There has been a considerable change, as you can see, in the financial program- 
ming of our municipal services and, needless to say, the responsibilities of this 
office were expanded to accommodate the past growth and for providing, what I 
would like to describe as, a team of proficient, well-organized and capable de- 
partment heads and employees to administer the many municipal services funded by 
the tax dollar. 

The underlying principle upon which I based the root of good government and good 
management was to equitably distribute the tax burden and to efficiently spend the 
tax dollar. My interest in our form of government stemmed from a World War II 
experience when I lost, for a time, the right of freedom and discovered first hand 
the value of living free and enjoying the advantages of our democratic way of life 

It has been my pleasure for the past fourteen years to serve the people of the 
Town of Wilmington as town manager. As I recently indicated to the Board of 
Selectmen in a letter of resignation, it is my opinion that we have through the 
years accomplished a great deal in many unrelated fields in local government, 
and the primary goal that I wanted to achieve was to provide professionalism and 
stability in the management of municipal affairs in the community. I feel that 
the mission has been accomplished. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Sterling Cr Morris 
Town Manager 



DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS - January 1, 1980 - 1981 



Board of Selectmen 



Robert J. Cain, Chairman 
Aldo A. Caira 
Rocco V. DePasquale 
Daniel H. Ballou, Jr. 
A. John Imbimbo 



Term 
Expires 
1982 
1981 
1981 
1983 
1983 



Town Manager 



Sterling C. Morris 



Moderator 



John M. Callan 



Annually 



School Committee 



Lester E. White, Chairman 

Philip A. Fenton, Sr., Vice Chairman 

Linda T. McMenimen, Secretary 

James D. Tighe 

James A. Demos 

John Brooks 



1983 
1981 
1982 
1981 
1982 
1983 



Superintendent of Schools 



Dr. Walter H. Pierce 



Finance Committee 



Walter J. Kaminski, Chairman 
William E. Hanlon, Vice Chairman 
Mary J. Deislinger, Secretary 
James V. Carroll 
Anita H. Backman 
Richard V. Barry 
Dennis J. Volpe 
Suzanne A. Dawe 



1981 
1983 
1981 
1981 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1983 



BOARDS, COMMITTEES AND COMMISSIONS - January 1, 1980 - 1981 



Term 
Expires 



Appeals, Board of 

Bruce MacDonald, Chairman 1983 

George G. Robertie 1981 

William A. Caperci 1982 

Neil L. Buckley, Associate 1981 

Joseph P. McMenimen, Associate 1981 

Carroll L. Robbins, Associate 1981 



Assessors, Board of 

Anthony E. Krzeminski, Principal 

Charles P. Lawrenson 

Roy P. McClanahan 

Beautif ication Commi ttee 
Paula D. O'Brien, Chairman 
Evelyn S. Burke 
Joseph J. Cuoco 
Cynthia L. White 
Hugo W. Wiberg, Jr. 



Carter Lecture Fund Committee 

Julia A. Fielding, Chairman 1983 

Frankline E. Allen, Secretary 1982 

Kenneth H. Wilson 1981 

Madelon C. Slater 1982 

Mildred E. Neilson 1983 

Cemetery Commission 

Mildred M. Cavanaugh, Chairman 1982 

Willis C. Lyford 1981 

William H. Russell 1983 

Conservation Commission 

Chester A. Bruce, Chairman 1982 

Jacqueline D. Allaman, Vice Chairman 1981 

Joan M. Sadowski, Treasurer 1983 

Donald H. Ugolini 1981 

Paul A. Rose 1982 

Joseph A. Guzzo 1983 

Lawrence A. Labrie 1983 

Council On Aging 

Wilson J. Belbin, Chairman 1982 

Irving H. Storms, Vice Chairman 1982 

Josephine M. Kelley, Secretary 1981 

Currie N. Johnson, Treasurer 1982 

Gladys A. Babine 1981 

James M. Shine 1981 

Lorraine C. Brozyna 1982 

Arthur Bernard 1983 

Dianna Holmes 1983 

Sheldon L. Maga 1983 

Margaret L. McNeil 1983 

Board of Health 

Joseph A. Paglia, Chairman 1981 

Thomas W. Morris 1982 

James J. Durkee 1983 



Term 
Expires 



Historical Commission 

Frank D. Cur ley, Chairman 1983 

Melinda P. Murphy, Secretary 1982 

Foster B. Balser 1981 

Ruth M. Harding 1981 

Evelyn T. Kaminski 1981 

William G. Meyer 1982 

Herbert L. Fielding 1983 

Housing Authority 

Barbara H. Larson, Chairman 1981 

George W. Hooper, Vice Chairman 1983 

Lorraine C. Brozyna, Secretary 1982 

Kevin J. McMillan, Asst. Treasurer 1985 

Melvin F. Keough 1983 
(Rep. of State Housing Board) 

Library Trustees 

John S. McNaughton, Chairman 1983 

Shirley F. Callan, Vice Chairman & 1981 
Secretary 

Esther L. Russell 1981 

Bruce F. Conant 1982 

Frederick C. Ryan 1982 

Evelyn M. Norton 1983 

Personnel Advisory Board 
John F. Burke 
Richard K. Hayden 

Planning Board 

John W. DeRoy, Chairman 1985 

Kenneth J. Miller 1981 

Louis A. Maglio, Jr. 1982 

Arnold C. Blake 1983 

William G. Hooper, Jr. 1984 

Recreation Commission 

Paul J. Bova, Chairman 1983 

John P. Cushing, Vice Chairman 1982 

Lorraine M. Hanna 1981 

Francis Sferrazza 1982 

Larry G. Noel 1983 

Redevelopment Authority 

Raymond A. McNamara, Chairman 1981 

Wilson J. Belbin 1982 

Daniel R. Stewart 1983 

Carl A. Backman 1984 

Currie N. Johnson (State Member) 1984 

Regional Vocational School Committee 

Frank H. McLean 1982 

Lawrence P. Flaherty 1983 

Registrars, Board of 

Mary G. Condrey, Chairman 1983 

Olin M. London 1981 

Robert L. Cavanaugh !982 
Priscilla R. W. Lynch, Clerk 



7 



Town Forest Committee 
Frank H. Tuttle 
Robert P. Palmer 
Paul C. Duggan 

Trustees of Trust Funds 
Rachel M. Burns 
Elizabeth R. Fosgate 
Margaret A. Wagstaff 

Water and Sewer Commissioners 
George R. Allan, Chairman 
Arthur R. Smith, Jr. 

Wilmington Election Officers 

Precinct 1 
Mary S. D'Eon, Warden 
Helen F. Sencabaugh, Dep. Warden 
Joan J. Lanzillo, Clerk 
Sandra S. Volpe, Dep. Clerk 
Clarice J. Ross, Inspector 
Alta Lyons, Dep. Inspector 
Edith Ann Graham, Inspector 
Jane A. Hill, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 2 
Phyllis M. O'Leary, Warden 
Charlotte M. Stewart, Dep. Warden 
Evelyn S. Burke, Clerk 
Marjorie E. MacDonald, Dep. Clerk 
Miriam H. Colucci, Inspector 
Lorita B. Bower, Dep. Inspector 
Eleanor Doyle, Inspector 
Henrietta I. Bonnell, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 3 
Stanley Webber, Warden 
Basil L. Weatherbee, Dep. Warden 
Loretta R. Caira, Clerk 
Alice G. Marcy, Dep. Clerk 
Mary E. Woods, Inspector 
Norinne M. Markey, Dep. Inspector 
Florence A. Balkus, Inspector 
Barbara J. Buck, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct A 
William H. Russell, Warden 
Sarah H. Cosman, Dep. Warden 
Elizabeth Cavanaugh, Clerk 
Mary A. O'Rourke, Dep. Clerk 
Doris V. Russell, Inspector 
Marjorie C. Kennedy, Dep. Inspector 
Mary J. Johnson, Inspector 
Ruth A. Kenney, Dep. Inspector 



Term 
Expires 



1981 
1982 
1983 



1981 
1982 
1983 



1981 
1982 



Annually 



Precinct 5 
Jean C. LeFavour, Warden 
Dora Ardolino, Dep. Warden 
Margaret Blonigen, Clerk 
Janice L. Rudnicki, Dep. Clerk 
Elizabeth A. Blalsdell, Inspector 
Mary T. Ward, Dep. Inspector 
Ruth S. Coursey, Inspector 
Annabell L. Antinarelli, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 6 
Margaret L. Perry, Warden 
Nancy J. Tarricone, Dep. Warden 
Barbara M. Cook, Clerk 
Sandra L. Murphy, Dep. Clerk 
Diane J. Ryan, Inspector 
Patricia D. McNaughton, Dep. Inspector 
Elizabeth Andrews, Inspector 
Evelyn W. Conlin, Dep. Inspector 

250th Anniversary Committee 

Joan Maga, Chairman 

Robert S. Boyce 

John Brown, Jr. 

Robert Z. Brown 

Harriet J. Cain 

Robert J. Cain 

Fructuoso T. Carrasco 

John C. Clark 

John P. Cushing 

David B. Hill 

George W. Hooper 

Charles Kelley 

Paula D. O'Brien 

Adele C. Passmore 

Joan D. Searfoss 

Wilmington Arts Council 

Tina M. Prentiss, Chairman 

Maybelle A. Bliss 

John Brooks 

Annette Campbell 

Sonja M. Carlson 

Helen M. Handrahan 

Deborah J. LaPenta 

James R. Miceli 

Adele C. Passmore 

Kathleen R. Porter 

Ronald Swasey 

Elizabeth White 

Ann Whitney 

Marion J. Woller 



Term 
Expires 



Annually 



8 



OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 



- January 1, 1980 - 



1981 



Accountant 

Animal Inspector 

Assistant Town Manager 

Cemetery Superintendent 

Civil Defense Director 

Constable 

Constable 

Dog Officer 

Engineer 

Fire Chief (Acting) 

Gas Inspector 

Highway Superintendent 

Inspector of Buildings 

Ipswich River Watershed Commission 

Librarian 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
Middlesex Canal Commission 
Middlesex County Advisory Board 
Milk Inspector 
Nurse, Public Health 
Plumbing Inspector 
Police Chief 

Public Buildings Superintendent 
Recreation Director 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Town Clerk 

Town Clerk (Assistant) 

Town Collector 

Town Collector (Assistant) 

Town Counsel 

Town Sanitarian 

Town Treasurer 

Town Treasurer (Assistant) 

Tree and Moth Superintendent 

Veterans' Agent 

Veterans' Grave Officer 

Water Superintendent 

Wire Inspector 



Robert H. Peters 
Joseph V. Balestrieri 
Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Francis E. Downs 
Silverius J. Blonigen 
James Edward Burke 
Arthur V. Lynch, Jr. 
Joseph V. Balestrieri 
Robert L. Higgins 
Daniel C. Wandell 
William R. Harrison 
Robert P. Palmer 
Charles P. Lawrenson 
Herbert D. Nicker son 
Philip W. Meriam 
Stella Courtney 
Stanley Webber 
Michael A. Caira 
Ernest F. Romano 
Anne E. Butters, R. N. 
William R. Harrison 
Bobby N. Stewart 
Roy P. McClanahan 
Ronald Swasey 
Martin P. Farrell 
Priscilla R. W. Lynch 
Kathleen M. Scanlon 
Marion C. Murphy 
Catherine P. Lindmark 
Alan Altman 
Ernest F. Romano 
Rachel M. Burns 
Elizabeth R. Fosgate 
Thomas 0. Sullivan 
Paul A. Farrell 
Paul A. Farrell 
Paul C. Duggan 
James J. Russo 



Auxiliary Police 

Edwin J. Williams, Provisional Lieutenant 

Robert C. Beals 

Franklin A. Giannotti 

Franklin J. Giannotti 

Arthur Hall 

Steven Holloway 

Roger t J. Lessard 

Stephen Mauriello 

Michael V. McCoy 

Terry L. McKenna 

William J. Mutchler 



Stephen J. Parsons 
James M. Peterson 
Charles E. Rooney, Jr. 
Philip J. Ryan 
Jon C. Shepard 
George R. Silva 
Douglas L. Smith 
Mark Smith 
Edward E. Thompson 
James R. White 
Edward J. Woods 



9 




I 

I 



SPECIAL "THANK YOU" TO THE 250TH ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE FOR A MEMORABLE YEAR! 




Bob Boyce, Harriet Cain, Jack Cushing, Bob Cain, 
Adele Passmore, Dave Hill, Joan Maga, Bob Brown, 
Paula O'Brian, Rudy Carrasco, Joan Searfoss, 
Jack Clark, Charlie Kelly. 



10 



250th Anniversary Committee 



This Committee was appointed by the Board of Selectmen to coordinate arrangements for the celebration of the 
250th Anniversary of the incorporation of the Town. Faced with a large assignment and a lack of funds the 
Committee in conjunction with the "Year of the Family" developed the theme of "We're Doing It In Wilmington" 
set out on a f unfilled summer of special events and fundraising activities to overcome the financial roadblocks. 

The Committee met for over a year in preparation for the many special events. The 250th celebration began 
with a Ball in January, followed by a flea market, dances, and special events provided by many town organiza- 
tions held in cooperation with the 250th Anniversary. Athletic events played a major part in fund raising 
to the Committee through softball challenges, the quadrathron race and the hospital bed race, as did our 
license plates, T-shirts, sweatshirts and other memorabilia. 

The July 4th weekend was a huge success with its carnival, breakfast and supper on the Common, concerts and 
games for all ages and a spectacular display of old-fashioned fireworks. 

The largest (and we believe best) parade our Town has ever had was held on September 7th. 

On the evening of September 25th, the 250th Anniversary date of our Town's incorporation, an ecumenical service 
was celebrated at St. Thomas Church. Guest speaker for the service and also our Parade Marshall was a former 
Wilmington resident, Rev. Roy A. Fiske. Clergy from all Town Churches participated in the ecumenical program. 
Upon completion of the service the Wilmington Minute Men lead the procession to the Common to witness the 
burying of a time capsule. All present viewed a raffle drawing and received a piece of the Town's Birthday 
cake. 

The closing event was an Awards Night and informal dance held at Shriners Auditorium on November 22nd. 

The Committee's final contribution will be a Commemorative Book. A copy of the Book will be placed in the 
Town's Library for future reference along with other Anniversary Memorabilia including the original minutes, 
the treasurer's report, tapes from Channel 6 TV covering all events that were filmed, and a printed program 
of the ecumenical service signed by Rev. Fiske. 

The Committee is extremely grateful and a sincere debt of gratitude is owed to clubs, organizations, churches, 
businesses, Aleppo Shrine, the press, cable television, and those individuals that gave so freely of their 
time, talents and resources in support of this celebration. The list would be so long as to preclude any 
attempt to detail it here. 

The Committee acknowledges appreciation on behalf of the Town for the use of the Old Town Hall Annex as our 
headquarters. This enabled the committee to center activities around the Common. 

We hope family awareness, participation and involvement in Wilmington has only just begun. 



11 



Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATION - 1981 FISCAL YEAR 



Total Appropriations (taxation) 

Total Appropriations (available) 

Total Deficits 

School Lunch Program 

Elderly Lunch Program 

Free Public Libraries 

Special Education Grant 

Underestimate 
Amount Necessary to Satisfy Court Judgment 
County Retirement Assessment 
County Tax 

Metropolitan Districts Area Charge 
Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 

Underestimate 
Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 
Air Pollution Control Districts 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
Ipswich River Water Shed 

Underestimate 
State Recreational Areas 

Underestimate 
Audit of Municipal Accounts 
Overlay of Current Year 

Gross Amount to be Raised 



15,653,972.00 
1,582,317.00 
96,946.12 
32,658.00 
15,351.00 
8,828.00 
26,484.00 
2,905.00 
40,221.37 
429,185.00 
343,809.73 
100,180.61 
246,800.00 
17,804.61 
2,637.00 
2,819.18 
2,648.40 
43.71 
356.35 
92,270.14 
4,159.95 
23,692.97 



$ 17,236,289.00 



1,822,643.82 
19,058,932.82 



Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds : 

1981 Fiscal Year Estimated Receipts from Local Aid 

and Agency Funds 
Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 
Licenses 
Fines 

Special Assessments 

General Government 

Protection of Persons and Property 

Health and Sanitation 

Highways 

Libraries 

Cemeteries 

Farm animal and Machinery Excise 
Interest 

In Lieu Tax of Tax Payments 
Miscellaneous 

Dog License Reimbursements 
Sewer Receipts 

Workman's Compensation and Insurance Reimb. 
Overestimates 

Voted from Available Funds 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 



$ 2,990,400.00 
1,223,461.00 
7,400.00 
39,918.00 
12,483.00 
14,462.00 
50,286.00 
4,205.00 
347.00 
1,680.00 
11,396.00 
88.00 
314,678.00 
883.00 
971.00 
3,510.00 
90,039.00 
6,677.00 
14,716.46 
1,582,317.00 

5,713,815.00 (3 80.50 per M 
151,913,705.00 (? 80.50 per M 



6,369,917.46 
12,689,015.36 
459,962.11 
12,229,053.25 
12,689,015.36 



12 



Items not entering into the determination of the Tax Rate: 



Betterments and Special Assessments added to taxes: 

a. Street Betterments and Interest $ 9,485.12 

b. Water Betterments and Interest 11,784.74 

c. Sewer Betterments and Interest 4,695.40 

Liens added to taxes: 

a. Water 53,263.60 

b. Sewer 935.44 

80,164.30 

Total of all other commitments $ 12,769,179.66 





Eagli Scout Larry J uergtns with his Timt Capiul: 
13 



Town Collector 



COMMITMENTS - 1980 

1982 Real Estate 

1981 Real Estate 

1981 App. Water Betterments 

Committed Interest 

1981 App. Street Betterments 

Committed Interest 

1981 Water Lien 

1981 App. Sewer Betterments 

Committed Interest 

1981 Sewer Liens 

1981 Personal Property 

1981 Farm 

1980 Real Estate 

1980 Motor Vehicle Excise 

1979 Motor Vehicle Excise 

App. Water Betterment - Paid in Full 

Committed Interest 

App. Street Betterment - Paid in Full 
Committed Interest 
Unapp. Street Betterment 
Ambulance 

TOTAL COMMITMENTS 



$ 1,322.21 
12,227,991.58 
7,349.05 
4,435.69 
6,388.04 
3,097.08 
52,829.24 
6,725.47 
3,892.28 
935.44 
459,962.23 
140.25 
850.85 
1,087,243.07 
29,445.77 
4,373.65 
154.95 
834.18 
2.56 
79,266.60 
12,042.00 
$13,989,282.19 



COLLECTIONS - 1980 
Real Estate 

App. Water Betterments 
Committed Interest 
App. Street Betterments 
Committed Interest 
Water Liens 

App. Sewer Betterments 
Committed Interest 
Sewer Liens 
Personal Property 
Farm 

Motor Vehicle Excise 
App. Water Betterment - 

Paid in Full 
Committed Interest 
App. Street Betterment - 

Paid in Full 
Committed Interest 
Unapp. Street Betterment 
Interest and Costs 
Ambulance 

Municipal Lien Cert, and 

Betterment Cert. 
Advertising Charges 
Registry Fees 

Water Department Collections 
TOTAL COLLECTIONS 



1981 
$5,740,465.52 
5,688.30 
3,317.17 
5,655.68 
2,658.39 
38,845.89 
1,597.23 
913.92 
2,240.41 
233,011.71 
56.25 



1980 
$5,478,722.61 

1,149.21 
827.47 
613.86 
379.32 

2,210.58 



174,647.91 
140.25 
904,358.50 

4,373.65 
154.95 

834.18 
2.56 
5,772.19 
54,813.27 
7 , 046 . 00 

5,020.00 
528.00 
287.00 
1,049,402.96 



1979 
79,742.39 
385.30 
151.34 
266.16 
149.70 

1,297.07 



26,955.94 
119,463.16 



OTHER YEARS 
54,158.86 
140.25 
38.88 
266.18 
163.00 
822.06 



1,215.56 
13,415.95 



$14,024,366.74 



14 



Town Treasurer 



GENERAL FUND 



Cash on Hand 7/1/79 
Receipts Fiscal 1980 
Disbursements Fiscal 1980 

Cash on Hand 6/30/80 

R EVENUE SHARING 

Cash on Hand 7/1/79 

Receipts Fiscal 1980 (including earnings) 
Disbursements Fiscal 1980 



$ 1,604,111.49 
68,929,934.05 
69,918,879.06 

$ 615,166.48 



$ 26,498.73 
591,774.21 
560,000.00 



Cash on Hand 6/30/80 $ 58,272.94 

During Calendar 1980, it was not necessary to borrow in anticipation of tax revenue. 
INVESTMENTS 

During calendar 1980, the program of investing idle funds in Certificates of Deposit, U.S. Treasury Note 
repurchase agreements, and daily interest accounts was continued with the following results: 



Designation of Funds 

Revenue Sharing 
General Funds 

Investments 

Daily Interest Accounts 
Total Calendar 1980 Earnings 



1980 Earnings 

$ 20,693.01 

364,838.34 
63,015.88 

$ 448,547.23 



The cash flow and investment program is greatly assisted through the cooperation of the Town Accountant Robert 
Peters (by projecting estimates of warrants), the Town Collector Marion Murphy (by timely advice of Collector's 
deposits) , and the Assistant Town Treasurer (by carrying much of the load of this department while the Treasurer 
is tied up in the investment program). The Treasurer thanks all of these people sincerely. 




Former Selectman J im Banda Retires 



15 



Town Clerk 



Vital Statistics - Chapter 46, General Laws as amended : 



Births - Final figure for 1979 
Births - Actually recorded for 1980 



197 
186 



Marriage Intentions recorded for 1980 
Marriages recorded for 1980 



152 
146 



Deaths recorded for 1980 



98 



Chapter 46, Section 15 : 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians, and registered hospital medical officers 
applying therefor, blanks for the return of births as required by law. 

Chapter 207, Sections 19, 20 and 40 : 

The laws pertaining to filing Marriage Intentions have been changed by Chapter 718, Acts of 1979. May I 
suggest that anyone intending to file call the Town Clerk's office for particulars. 

Chapter 207, Section 45 : 

Twenty-nine burial permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as Special Agent for the Board of Health in 
1980. Nine out-of-state deaths were reported and filed in this office. Twenty-two Wilmington Veterans were 
buried in Wildwood Cemetery. 



Permits and Certificates of Registration for the Storage of Inflammables, etc : 

These licenses must be registered by the owner or occupant of the land, or by the holder of the licenses in 
the Town Clerk's office on or before April 30th of each year. Notification will be sent on or about the 15th 
of March. If not registered, by law the license may be revoked by the licensing authority after a public 
hearing. 



Other Services : 

Keep minutes of Annual and Special Town Meetings up-to-date. (Certify same upon request.) 
The Town Clerk has complete charge of elections, issuing papers for nominees for town elections, recording 
results of elections and providing the State with the results of State Elections and any changes in town by- 
laws. 



TOWN RECORDS 



Inflammables 

Uniform Commercial Code Recordings 

Uniform Commercial Code Terminations 

Federal Tax Lien Recordings 

Dogs Licenses Issued 

Duplicate Dog Tags Issued 

Business Certificates Issued 

Business Withdrawal 

Fish and Game Licenses 

Pole Locations 

Medical Registrations 

Raffle and Bazaars 



1,395 



3 
32 
4 

872 
10 

14 



101 
220 
34 
10 



16 



Other Services (continued) 



Provide the County of Middlesex with up-to-date list of all persons over the age of 17 years for Jury Pool. 
Certify an undetermined number of Births, Marriages, and Deaths. 

Certify an undetermined number of births (Abstract form) used for school entrance, driver's licenses, out-of- 
state travel and job applications. 

Supply proof of residence by letter or card - used for college entrance. 
Provide for sale miscellaneous books and maps. 

Receive writs against the Town and forward copies of same to the Town Counsel. 

Occasionally appear in court for the town, when summoned - producing all papers and maps required. 
Complete notes of the Town as received from the Town Treasurer - after approval by the Board of Selectmen. 
Certify same. 

Record Board of Appeals applications and Decisions and certify same as provided in Chapter 41A, Section 11 

and 15 of the Mass. General Laws. 

Keep a file of decisions by the Town Counsel. 

Record minutes and decisions of the Planning Board. 

Keep a file of Annual Reports. 

Keep a file of all Zoning and Town By-Law changes as approved by the Attorney General. 
Swear town officers to the faithful performance of their duties and keep a record of same. 
Accept business registrations and keep a file for public use. 

Prepare the Town Ballot for the voting machines and order the printing of same. 
Supervise payrolls for the Town Meetings and Election workers. 

Supervise the distribution and filing of nomination papers and the report of campaign and political finance 
expenditures. 

By virtue of her office, the Town Clerk is clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this capacity, she has met 
with the Board of Registrars on a regular monthly meeting night as well as special meetings, kept the minutes 
of the meetings up to date, and registered voters during regular office hours of the Town Clerk. 
She also meets with the Board for special evening sessions to register voters and to certify nomination papers. 



Dog Officer 



Dogs Licensed 



1385 



Dogs Confined 



496 



Complaints Covered 



2946 



Court Complaints 



360 



Court Fines 



$3,660 



Dogs Disposed of 



573 



Dogs Killed by Cars 



77 



Residents Notified for Licenses 



840 



17 



Board of Registrars 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3 of the Town By-Laws, meetings of the Board of Registrars were held 
on the second Monday of each month for the registration of voters and to conduct business. Under Chapter 62 
of the Acts of 1958, these meetings are open to the public and press, and it is so posted in the Town Hall. 

The Board held registration periods as are required by law for the Presidential Primary of March 4th, Town 
Election and Town Meeting of April 19th, Special Town Meeting of June 9th, State Primary of September 16th, 
Special Town Meeting of September 22nd, State Election of November 4th and the Special Town Meeting of 
December 8th. Needless to say the Board was kept very busy. 

The Town Clerk attended most of the Conferences in order to keep up with the changing election laws. 

The 1980 Calendar year ended up with 9,725 registered voters, up over 12% from last year. Citizens of the 
town should try to encourage neighbors and friends to return census forms the first of each year and be 
counted, a true census is an asset to the town. 



1980 Preliminary Federal Census 17,495 

1980 Town Estimated Census 18,000 

Democrats 4,121 

Republicans 961 

Independents 4 , 643 

Total Registered Voters 9,725 



Constable 

During the year the following notices and warrants were posted: 



Event 


Posted 


Date 


Presidential Primary 


6 places 


February 12, 1980 


Annual Town Meeting 


6 places 


March 17, 1980 


Special Town Meeting 


6 places 


March 17, 1980 


Special Town Meeting 


6 places 


May 27, 1980 


State Primary 


6 places 


August 12, 1980 


Special Town Meeting 


6 places 


August 26, 1980 


State Election 


6 places 


October 16, 1980 


Special Town Meeting 


6 places 


November 18, 1980 



We have also served and posted notices for the Town and other of the town offices and departments. 



18 



Town Engineer 



E valuation of Work Load 

An examination of the work load for the Engineering Department reveals that we spent our time this year as 
follows: 20% Highway Department, Construction Projects; 25% Water and Sewer Board, Construction Projects; 
15% Planning Board, Subdivisions; 25% Town-Wide and Future Projects; 10% Town Manager and Selectmen; 10% all 
others. 

In-House Procedures 

The updating of Assessors' maps continues to be a problem which requires a large part of our time. Current 
updated Assessors' maps are a valuable tool for the town's citizens and other town departments, boards and 
commissions . 

Cataloguing of the department's material, which was started sometime ago, was continued with summer help 
personnel. 

Projects for the Year 

Previously accepted streets for which construction was completed under the betterment act were Dexter Street, 
King Street Extension, and Reading Avenue. Subdivision streets inspected during the year to assure complianc 
with Town standards for future acceptance were Andrew Street, Houghton Road, Jewel Drive, and Jonspin Road. 

Conclusion 

The department continues. to adjust time and resource priorities to better serve town-wide interests. 



Redevelopment Authority 



Early in the year, the option of William Myers of Jewell Manufacturing Company expired on the Jewell Industrial 
Park and Michael Integlia, president of Marteg Corporation of Pawtucket, Rhode Island and builder of the Altron 
and Harwick Chemical buildings, approached the Board requesting consideration for finishing the development. 

Marteg signed an agreement with the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority and proceeded to build a 40,000 square 
foot building on 3.5 acres of land for Vydel of New England, Inc., makers of vinyl siding. They also relieved 
the water condition in the park by cleaning the culvert under the B & M Railroad property. 

The current developer intends to make his own investment in the park by erecting a building which he will lease 
out to several tenants. 

Daniel Stewart was appointed to the Board in May, replacing Harold J. Allen, Jr. 
The park is now 50% developed and sold. 



19 



Police Department 



The enclosed statistical report represents a total of all crimes, complaints and incidents reported during 
1980; and, for the most part the corresponding enforcement efforts of the Wilmington Police Department. 
During 1980 overall incidents and complaints increased by 2,454, from 11,258 in 1979 to 13,712 in 1980; cor- 
respondingly, criminal arrests were increased by 114, from 718 in 1979 to 832 during 1980. Motor vehicle 
citations issued increased by 1,376 from 517 in 1979 to 1,893 in 1980. Contained in these citations were a 
total of 2,417 motor vehicle violations cited. Also during 1980 the Town's Parking Rules and Regulations 
were accepted and 738 parking tickets were issued. 

In May of 1980 the department put into use three (3) new radars which were obtained through a grant from the 
Governor's Highway Safety Council. These radars have been used extensively throughout the community and in 
many cases in response to citizens complaints. The result of their use can be seen in the number of speeding 
complaints cited 1,280 of which a major portion were issued by radar. 

In October of 1979 the Town-Wide Vandalism Committee submitted its report and made several recommendations. 
The Police Department is pleased to report that wherever possible these recommendations have been instituted 
and are currently on-going in the day-to-day operations of the department. Certainly programs and policy 
changes will not eliminate vandalism; however, we are making substantial headway in building a mutual coopera- 
tion and support between the Police Department and the community in our efforts of vandalism prevention. 

The department is also pleased to report that in August of 1980 the Auxiliary Police force was established 
under Chapter 639 Acts of 1950. This organization provided a much needed force which will augment the regular 
department in the event of a major disaster. The members of the Auxiliary force are continually undergoing 
training which will qualify them should such a disaster require their call-out. As a part of their training 
members of the Auxiliary are assigned to a variety of nonenf orcement police functions such as, traffic control 
and school and municipal building patrols. In the four months that this force has been organized it has 
volunteered 725 hours of such service to the town. 

During 1980 the Department Community Crime Prevention programs finally got off the ground, with the assignment 
and training of Officer William Gable as the Community Crime Prevention Officer. Wilmington now joins thou- 
sands of other communities in this country which are using this approach, to reducing a constantly rising 
crime rate. The success of any such program depends entirely upon the awareness and participation of the 
entire community; and, to this point, the response of the citizens of Wilmington has been nothing short of 
encouraging. 

The department makes special note of the appointment of Officers Patrick King and William Jepson to the 
Police Department in May of 1980. 

In closing this report I want to thank the Town Manager, Assistant Town Manager, the Board of Selectmen, all 
department heads and their workers for their support and cooperation during the year of 1980. 

A special note of thanks to the staff and members of Wilmington Poice Department, for without their support 
and continuing efforts, none of our accomplishments could have been realized. 



ARRESTS: 



Assault & Battery 
Breaking & Entering 
Disorderly Conduct 
Fraud (Larceny by Check) 
Larceny 

Larceny of Motor Vehicle 
Malicious Damage 
Narcotics 



52 
48 
64 
58 
41 
7 
23 
43 



Non-support & Other Family Offenses 
Rape 

Other Sex Offenses 
Receiving Stolen Property 
Liquor Violations 
Robbery 
Runaway 

All Other Offenses 



142 



312 
833 



8 
7 
9 
17 



1 
1 



Total 



20 




wmmm 



Juveniles Released Without Court 
Juveniles Referred to Court 

MOTOR VEHICLE VIOLATIONS ; 

Drivers License Violations 
Endangering 

Leaving Scene of Accident 
Operating Under Influence 
Unregistered-Uninsured 
Speed 

Using Without Authority 
All Other Offenses 



Total 



MOTOR VEHICLE CITATIONS ISSUED : 

Warnings 

Complaints 

Arrests 



PROTECTIVE CUSTODY BY AGES: 



17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 



& Under 



& Over 



Total 



CRIMES REPORTED: 

ASSAULTS: 

Gun 
Knife 

Other Dangerous Weapon 
Hands, Feet, etc. 
Simple Assaults 



BREAKING & ENTERING: 



Total 



Forced Entry 
Entry, No Force 
Attempted Entry 



LARCENY : 



Total 



Pocketpicking 

Pursesnatching 

Shoplifting 

From Motor Vehicles 

M/V Parts & Accessories 

Bikes Stolen 

Larceny from Buildings 

All Others 



65 
214 



59 
65 
9 

149 
69 
1,280 

2 

784 
2,417 



701 
1,026 
166 



Total 1,893 



59 
21 
29 
24 
13 
17 
7 
13 
60 



243 



1 
9 
15 
39 
31 
95 



227 
5 
75 
307 



Total 



4 
3 
6 

146 
75 

131 
53 

234 

652 



LARCENY OF MOTOR VEHICLES : 

Stolen Wilmington-Recovered Wilmington 
Stolen Wilmington-Recovered Out of Town 
Stolen Elsewhere-Recovered Wilmington 

ROBBERIES : 

Firearm 
Knife 

Strong Arm 



Total 



SEX CRIMES : 
Rape 

Attempted Rape 
Indecent Exposure 
Indecent Assault 
Molesting 
Other 



Total 



MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS : 

Arson & Bombing (Threats & Attempts) 

Burglar Alarms Responded to 

Disturbances 

Domestic Problems 

Emergencies 

Fires Responded to 

Juveniles 

Lost & Found 

Malicious Damage 

Missing Persons 

Missing Persons Returned 

Persons Still Missing 

Phone Calls, Annoying, Obscene, etc. 

Prowlers 

Sudden Deaths 

Suicides & Attempts 

Suspicious Activities Reports 

Miscellaneous 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 

Fatalities 

Cruisers Dispatched 

Restraining Orders Served 

Parking Tickets Issued 

OTHER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS : 

Firearm Idents Issued 
License to Carry Firearms 
Firearm Permits to Sell 
Gunsmith Permits 
Permits to Sell Ammo 



Total 



Reports to Insurance Companies 
Licenses Suspended & Revoked RMV 
Licenses Reinstated by RMV 



125 

28 
55 
52 



4 
3 

12 
2 
4 
9 

34 



29 
1,524 
2,395 
240 
146 
181 
3,129 
16 
964 
40 
34 
6 

119 
34 
9 
5 

636 
2,934 
969 
4 

7,004 
59 
738 



150 
181 
3 
3 

3 

340 

467 

78 

38 



21 



Fire Department 



It is my pleasure to submit the following Annual Report of operations, activities, and to reflect the 
accomplishments of the Wilmington Fire Department during the year 1980. 

The manual force consists of Chief, Deputy Chief, four Lieutenants and twenty-eight Privates. There is a 
call force of eleven members. The department responded to a total of one thousand eight hundred and seventeen 
calls (1,817) during 1980. 



Residential Buildings 58 

Commercial Buildings 19 

Vehicles 98 

Brush, grass and rubbish 550 



Out of Town Assistance 
False Alarms or Needless Calls 
Rescue and Ambulance 
Service Calls 



26 
138 
726 
202 



Estimated value of property endangered was 17,293,800 

Estimated property loss was 220,900 

Permits issued for storage of oil 121 

Permits issued for blasting 37 

Permits issued for home fire alarms and inspections 35 

Permits issued for model rockets 8 

Permits issued for storage of black powder 22 

Permits issued for propane gas 8 

Permits issued for flammable liquids 23 

As required by law, inspections of all schools, public buildings, and all flammable storage were made. 

The Fire Prevention Bureau, with the assistance of Private Charles Lauziere, made all necessary inspections 
of all business establishments in Town. Local industries were assisted in the organization and training of 
fire brigades. Fire Prevention lectures were given to the school children. In-Service Inspections were 
conducted by Engine Companies to Target Hazard. 

The Fire Alarm Division, under the direction of Private Blaisdell, made all necessary repairs to the fire 
alarm system and made two hundred seventeen changeovers for the light, telephone and cable T.V. companies. 
Checked and serviced all fire alarm boxes. Put up two miles of new R.C. wire. New wire was strung on Church 
Street, Lowell Street, Main Street and Progress Way. Added a new circuit to the Fire Alarm Board. Put 
three new boxes in service. 



Box 3423 
Box 5476 
Box 6341 



Avco 

Prudential Building 
Compugraphic 



Progress Way 
100 Fordham Road 
Ballardvale Street 



Thirty (30) members were recertified in C.P.R. as mandated by the State. 

The appointment of David Currier to firefighter. 

I urge all homeowners and occupants in the Town of Wilmington to protect themselves and their families by 
installing approved early-warning fire detectors and alarms in their homes. 

The dedicated service, loyalty and efficiency of the members of the Wilmington Fire Department cause me to be 
extremely proud. Each member is entitled to take pride in aiding the record of accomplishment during the past 
year, and it is my earnest desire that, together, we will continue to take giant steps forward. 

I would like to express my heartfelt thanks to each and every member of the Call Department for their splendic 
cooperation during this past year 1980 and for all the years preceding 1980. 



22 



During 1980, the department lost the valuable service of two of its members. Chief Arthur Boudreau through 
retirement and regrettably George Anderson Sr., who passed away. We, the members of this department, and I'm 
sure many of the citizens who benefited by their devotion and service to duty, will miss these two gentlemen. 

Special thanks and appreciation are hereby extended to the Town Manager, Assistant Town Manager, Board of 
Selectmen, Department Heads and their crews for their every effort and cooperation during the year 1980. 



The Tree Department carried on its routine work of cutting and removing trees. Due to a greal deal of high 
winds, a large amount of trimming was required. Sixty- two (62) roadside trees were removed. They were all 
diseased. Roadside stumps were removed. Tree repairs were done after being damaged by vehicles. Poison ivy 
was sprayed. The department assisted the School Maintenance and Public Buildings Department by replacing 
lights and flag pole ropes. Christmas decorations were put up at the Common and Deming Way. Tree Department 
equipment was used to plow snow for the Highway Department. 

Dutch Elm Disease : 

Elm tree samples were taken again this year and sent to the University of Massachusetts for testing. As a 
result of this, eighty (80) elms were removed. 

Insect Pest Control : 

As predicted last year, our gypsy moth population has increased out of control. As much spraying as pos- 
sible was done to try and ^ontrol the problem. Spraying was also done to control elm lead beetles, clinch 
bugs, pine saw flies, Eastern tent caterpillars, fall web worms, ticks and Japanese beetles. Fifty-nine (59) 
hornet nests were removed on requests from residents. 

Mosquito Control Program : 

Mosquito control was done between the hours of 8 p.m. and 12 a.m. Again this year larvaecide was put in all 
trapped waters and also some catch basins. 

I would like to thank the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their support, the town departments 
for their cooperation, and the men of the Tree Department for their efforts during the year 1980. 



Tree Department 




Water and Sewer Department 



PUMPING STATISTICS 



WATER SUPPLY 


1976 


1977 


1978 


1979 


1980 


M^vIttiiitti fifll 1 nn<! Ppr T)av 


4.922 000 


4 421 000 


4,530,000 


4 065 000 


3 666 00i 

~J y WWW y \J vy 


Mp vi mum HAllon^ Per WppIc 


31,232,000 


26,521,000 


29,191,000 


19,732,000 


23, 218,00' 


Mavimi im 1 nnc Ppr Mn n t" H 

1 let A. I. III LI 111 UullULlO L tz L I l\J 11U11 


116 396 000 


102,432,000 


113,113,000 


105 641 000 

X V-/ _/ j X. y W W 


97 731 00t 

y 1 y 1 ~J X j \J W 


Avptapp flAllon^ Ppr T)av 

£1 V C i- CI t, C vJCl J — LUUO J. CI. UCLy 


2,762,000 


2,840,000 


2,940,000 


2,954,000 


2,848,00' 


A\7oraop Hp 1 1 one Pot* Mnnth 


84 006 000 

W ~T y WWW y WW W 


86, 375,000 


89 432 000 


89 870 416 


86 620 OOt 




1 008 080 000 

J- 5 WW W | VUV ) \J\J\J 


1 036 494 000 


1 073 187 000 


1 078 445 000 


1 039 440 OOi 

X y IJ Jy j"T*TW y WW 


Annual Rainfall 


34.67" 


46.31" 


31.33" 


45.47" 


37.721 




CONSUMPTION 


STATISTICS - 


GALLONS 






Residential Use* 


329,744,851 


398,858,053 


321,073,950 


335,287,725 


346,379,92 


Percent of Total 


44 . 6% 


51.4% 


41.0% 


40.0% 


41.1 


Industrial Use 


409,497,779 


376,981,836 


460,883,880 


492,740,925 


487,441,20 


Percent of Total 


55.3% 


48.6% 


58.9% 


59.0% 


58.4 


Total Water Metered 


739,242,630 


775,839,889 


781,957,830 


828,028,650 


833,821,12' 


Percent of Water Pumped** 


73.3% 


74.9% 


72.8% 


77.0% 


80.3" 



*Residential use includes small commercial users, that is, all water passing through 5/8" meters only. 

**The difference between the water pumped and the water metered, 205,618,875 gallons in 1980, represents water 
used for flushing of water mains, for fires and other hydrant uses, and water lost due to breaks and leakage 
throughout the system. 

There was a slight reduction in our annual consumption in 1980. It was necessary again this year to restrict 
the outside use of water and these restrictions will be necessary until our new water treatment plant is com- 
pleted. The anticipated completion date is April of 1981. 

We received a $1,868,773. grant from the State toward the cost of the treatment plant and in December we 
received a check for $700,000., the first installment on the grant. 

WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM 

Street No. of Feet Main Hydrants 
Lawrence Street Ext. 252 6" 1 

Birchwood Road 60 8" 

Miscellaneous streets 775 6" 

relaid for sewer construction 



24 



iue to the number of frozen service pipes, a thawing machine was purchased to provide an efficient means of 
estoring water to affected homes. 

fATER QUALITY 

n compliance with the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act, 373 samples were taken throughout the system. During 
he year it was necessary to operate all the wells longer than desirable. This was due to the fact that 
leveral wells are out of service because of poor water quality (to be rectified by the treatment plant) and 
Irought conditions. The precipitation for the year was 8" below that of 1979. By overworking the wells, 
ioorer quality water is drawn in, usually increasing the iron content. 

'INANCIAL 

'ith the passage of Proposition 2 1/2 the effect of municipal services on the tax rate has come under close 
icrutiny. It is appropriate, therefore, to make the taxpayer aware that the Water Department relies only on 
'ater revenue to provide service to our customers. 

EWER SYSTEM 



curing the year, two additional construction contracts were awarded. There is only one contract left to be 
warded under the current construction program. The majority of the construction in 1980 centered around the 
ilver Lake area. 

onstruction has begun on a septage dumping station located on Main Street in the vicinity of the Town Park 
ridge over the railroad. The purpose of this dumping station is to provide a means of controlling the dis- 
josal of septage wastes collected by "honey wagons". The present disposal manhole on Woburn Street will be 
ealed and abandoned when the new station is completed this spring. 




Sewer Construction Groundbreaking ■ Gioioso 9 sons. 



25 



Cemetery Department 



Regular maintenance was carried on throughout the year. During the warmer months, mowing was done regularly, I 
and a number of graves were loamed and seeded. Broken lot numbers were replaced, markers set, and foundation^ 
for monuments were poured. Brush and debris was continually cleaned up by the department. 



Throughout the year, loam was moved into Section J for grading. 
Gravel was hauled in to grade for hot topping. 



A new avenue was excavated and worked on. 



The Common, Town Park and beach areas were continually cleaned up, with the removal of large amounts of 
rubbish. New planks and plywood was painted. The bleachers were set up at Little League field and Town Park 
The Town Park and Little League Park were made ready for the ball season with raking, dragging and marking, i 
large amount of fencing was repaired at the beaches by Sturdy Fence Company. ^ 

Whitney Barrel Company donated a number of plastic and steel barrels to the Town. The company painted all of 
the barrels red, white and blue for the town's anniversary. Our men assisted the rubbish collection during 
the week of the anniversary parade. A capsule was buried on the Common on the anniversary date of the town. 

Several sections of fencing along Wildwood Street were welded and repaired with the help of the Highway 
Department. 

New screens were installed in the office building windows, the office was painted, and a new roof installed 
the Maintenance Department. 

Two of the men of this department have been attending supervisory school. 
Cemetery employees and vehicles assisted the Highway Department with snow removal. 

The Department extends many thanks to Town Officials and Town Employees who assisted throughout the year. 



Burials: 



Receipts : 



Residents died in Wilmington 

Residents died elsewhere 

Non-residents 

Babies 

Cremations 



10 
43 
47 
2 
6 

108 



Interments 

Foundations for monuments 
Setting markers 
Affidavits 
Deeds 

Copy of Deeds 



S7,660.0( : 
1,047.0(1 
130. 0( 
42.0(J 
69.0(1 
6.0( 
$8,954.0(1 



Reserve: 



Trust Funds: 



Sale of lots 



$11,140.00 



Perpetual care 



$11,400.0( 



26 



Public Buildings Department 



980 started with a fire in the boiler room at the Boutwell Street School on January 12th. Fortunately damage 
as confined to the boiler room and the school was closed for only one day. 

n February, someone tried to drive a truck through a set of double doors at the Wildwood Street School. The 
oors were demolished and required replacement. 

uildings and Grounds personnel programmed voting machines and set up the polling places for elections in 
arch, April, September and November. 

ew security screens were installed at the Cemetery office building. The grills were successful as attempts 
o break in ceased. 

he High School gymnasium was set up for the annual town meeting and the Barrows Auditorium was set up for 
wo special town meetings. 

new roof was installed on the Cemetery office building. The old roof is thought to be about thirty years 
Id. 

he C.E.T.A. program ended for the Public Buildings and Grounds department. The C.E.T.A. program appears to 
e over after six years in operation. 

lectrical service was provided on the Common and at other locations for the July 4th activities and for the 
50th Anniversary celebration activities. 

9 the Walker School was closed in June, all desks, books and supplies were moved to ther schools. The 
iilding was used as a Teen Center during the summer and closed completely in November. 

new intrusion alarm was installed at the Glen Road School. This alarm is activated by motion rather then 
ound . 

i] football field was prepared at the West Intermediate School for Pop Warner teams. The field was lined and 
pal posts and bleachers were set up. 

lergy conservation efforts resulted in twenty-five percent less fuel used in 1980 then in 1979. Energy con- 
srvation efforts are continuing. 

fr thanks to the personnel of the Public Buildings and Grounds department for their efforts in making 1980 a 
lccessful year. 

y.so, thanks to those departments that assisted us throughout the year. 



27 



Inspector of Buildings 







1 Q7R 

17 / O 




1 Q7Q 




xyou 




No . 


\7a *liiat - "lfM'i 
V aj.ua u XUU 


llU • 


VdlUa L ± U 11 


CiO • 


Valuat ioi 


T*W taI 1 4 nr> I clnol a "FQtn"I1xri 

uweiiiug v, s ingxe l duiny j 




6 qiA nnn 


A9 


6i ftnft nnn 

9 J. | OUO , UUU 


/■ C* 
40 


9X,OD/,U(Jl 


ncSlUcni la 1 uaLdgcb 


q 


nnn 


1 1 
XX 


7 a nnn 

/ H , UUU 


ij 


73 , ! UUP 


A/^r^^ ~{ /-^ n o fi, A 1 f ora h 1 />rtc it*oo 1 
nliu X L XUILo Qt nLLcLaL 1U 11 o V I- c o . y 


ins 


ifti Ann 

JO.*. , 4UU 


X J J 


finn a^a 




7 or cn/ 
/ OJ , Jul 






$1,359,400 




$2,282,454 




$2,742,50( 


Industrial Buildings 


5 


625,000 


6 


9,847,000 


6 


2,610,00( 


Commercial Buildings 


1 


65,000 







3 


381, 00( 


Additions & Alteration (non-Res.) 


17 


930,600 


19 


402,000 


23 


848, 00( 


Swimming Pools 


42 


115,100 


34 


122,450 


49 


203, 00( 


Signs 


16 


17,000 


10 


3,550 


17 


13,821 


Utility Buildings 


2 


88, 000 


1 


18,000 


3 


214,69? 


Office Buildings 












2 


1,003, 30( 


Sheds & Barns 


8 


33,500 


5 


6,300 


5 


4.00C 


Wood Burning Stoves 


2 


500 


163 


84,175 


125 


62,60( 






$1,874,700 




$10,483,475 




$5,340,42* 






$3,234,100 




$12,765,929 




$8,082,92* 


Renewals 


6 




6 




6 




Demolitions 


14 


90,900 


7 


26,150 


7 


73,00( 


Fire Damage & Repair 







4 


35,500 


5 


58,50( 


Foundations 


c 

J 




i n 


11, JUU 


X J 






260 


$ 109,400 


451 


$ 89 ,.150 


445 


$ 200, 70( 


REPORT OF FEES RECEIVED AND TURNED 


OVER TO 


TREASURER: 










Building Permits 


261 


$ 7,596.80 


445 


$37,790.00 


436 


$18,837.9( 


Wiring Permits 


299 


4,009.75 


328 


4,210.75 


360 


6,154.21 


Gas Permits 


90 


822.00 


118 


1,026.00 


101 


1,101.0( 


Plumbing Permits 


80 


755.50 


109 


1,060.00 


133 


1,413. 0( 


Day Care Center Cert. (Insp. fees) 


7 


400.00 


3 


100.00 


6 


150. 0( 


Ind. Elec. Permits (Ann. Chg.) 










7 


560. 0( 




737 


$13,584.05 


1,003 


$44,186.75 


1.043 


$28,216.11 




State Senator Buell, State Representative Miceli, and Congressman Shannon greet constituents. 



Board of Health 



i Board of Health during the period 1980-1981 consisted of Joseph Paglia, Chairman, James Durk.ee, and 
mas Morris. 

There were no full time changes in personnel during 1980. 

Dr. Antonia Bayog was recruited as Public Health Physician on a part-time basis. 

The first year of a three year contract was completed in June 1980 for rubbish collection by Stanley 
Roketenetz Co. 

The Board continued to fund Wilmington Family Counseling which again showed an increase in service with 
no added cost to the Town. 

A total of $13,500 was budgeted for Share. This was the same amount as 1979. 
558 dogs were immunized at the annual dog clinic. 

The Director was appointed Hazardous Waste Coordinator by the Town Manager. 

The Director conducted a housing survey in conjunction with a Federal Housing Grant for the Town. 
The Board developed a new fee schedule to reflect rising administrative costs. 
School cafeterias were inspected again during the year. 

A class demonstrating choke saving techniques was conducted for the restaurant community together with 
Leo Woodside. 

Hazardous waste investigations were increased during 1980 with particular emphasis on possible dump sites. 
Mr. Leo LeBlanc acted as Director during vacation periods. 
A Town-wide Flu and Pneumonia Clinic was conducted. 

The Board sponsored a hearing test during Hospital Day at the New England Memorial Hospital. 
No funding was appropriated for legal services for the Board of Health. 

In conjunction with "Better Health Week" and "National High Blood Pressure Month" several clinics were 
held with the nurses located at the drug stores, library, and office taking blood pressures and giving 
information in hypertension control. 

Mystic Valley continued to provide services to the Town. 

The Director was re-elected to the Executive Board of the Massachusetts Officers Association for the 
period 1980-1981. 

The Board met routinely on a monthly basis for the conduct of its business. 
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

1. Immunizations Office visits 78 

Home visits 26 

29 



A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE (continued) 



Tetanus/Diphtheria Clinic 

Number of doses administered 17 

Town Employees 17 

High school seniors 90 

Immunizations are being given on an ongoing basis at the Nurse's Office 
(8:30 - 9:30 a.m. and 3:30 - 4:30 p.m.) 

2. Communicable Diseases Reported Reported 24 

3. Flu/Pneumonia Immunization Clinic Total doses administered (Flu) 551 

Total doses administered (Pneumonia) 195 

4. Tuberculosis Report T. B. test to high school seniors 90 

T. B. tests to school personnel 161 

Office visits 97 

Home visits 32 

B. PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

1. Nursing visits during year 355 

Office visits 85 

2. Premature births Reported 6 

Home visits 7 

Premature deaths 1 

3. Newborn Infants Home visits 33 

4. Hypertension Program Office visits 336 

Attendance at monthly clinic 76 

Location at drug stores and Library 111 

Location at polls during voting 109 

Attendance during "Better Health Week" 58 

5. Diabetic Screening Town employees 17 

Office visits 8 

Attendance at Drop-In-Center 73 

Attendance during "Better Health Week" 38 
Fees collected $116.00 

6. Drop-In-Center Number of counseling sessions 49 

Attendance 855 

7. Gentle Exercise Program Number of sessions 35 

Attendance 457 

8. General Health Supervision Home visits 753 

C. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH 

1. Licenses and Permits Sewerage 100 

Food 59 

Milk store 50 

Milk vehicle 1 

Stable 30 

Refuse transporation 21 

Installers 41 

Piggery 

Miscellaneous 65 
Fees collected $4,433.50 



30 



2. Food Establishments 

3. Complaints 

4. Inspection of Animals 

5. Dental Clinic 

6. Installer's Examination 

7. Sewerage 

8. Bathing Areas 

9. Water Analysis 

10. Recreation Camps 

11. Court 

12. Rabies Clinic 



13. Share-Financial Summary 

Share's total income, January 1 - December 31, 1980 is $569,296. During this twelve month period, 
Share actually expended $17,941 in services to the residents of Wilmington ($15,430 direct and $2,511 
indirect). That is, 3.2% ($17,941 divided by $569,296) of Share's income went to Wilmington. 
Wilmington contributed $13,206 which is 2.3% of Share's income. For each dollar Wilmington con- 
tributed, Wilmington citizens received $1.36 in services. 



Inspections 


101 




231 


Animals quarantined 


36 


Animals released 


36 


Animals disposed of 


276 


Number of children serviced 


1,193 


Exams given 


7 


Inspect ions /Investigations 


563 


Samnl p<? mllppfpd 

UOiUl/i.CO * — w -L -1- \— V — l_ C-l 


14 


Samples collected 


5 


Inspections 


1 


Court appearances 


11 


Dogs immunized 


558 


Fees collected 


$1,116.00 



Central Intake Unit 

6 Intake Evaluations x $90. 55/client 
1 Intake Evaluation x $108. 76/client 

1 Client in Short-term Counseling 

4 client weeks x 26.70/week 

Outpatient Drug-Free Counseling (25 clients) 

176 client weeks x $26.70/week 
216 client weeks x $26.92/week 

Other Community Services 

In-School Counseling 
Evaluations (766) 
(Jan. -June 1980) 

In-School Counseling 
School Consultations 
(July-Dec. 1980) 



Sub Total 



543.30 
108.76 



106.80 = 



4,699.20 
5,814.72 = 



Total 



652.06 



106.80 



10,513.92 



92 hours 

20.5 

112.5 hours x $16.81 

105. hours 
11.5 



116.5 hours x $17.95 
Psychiatric Evaluations (766) 5 hours x $35.00 

Sub-Total 



1,891.13 

2,091.18 
175.00 
15,430.09 



31 



13. Share (continued) 



Ancillary and indirect costs, including Central Administration,' 
Business Management, Clinical Supervision, and Program Evaluation. 
(15.5% of above total January to June - 17% July to December 

GRAND TOTAL 



Town contribution to date - January to December 1980 
For everv dollar contributed to SHARE, Wilmington received $1.36 in services 
14. Wilmington Family Counseling Service, Inc . 
CLIENTS: 



$ 2,511.88 
$17,941.97 
$13,206.00 



Number of families in treatment 
Average per month - 59 

Number of new families 

Average per month - 7.5 

Number of families returning for further treatment 

Primary presenting problems 

Adult with personal emotional problems 
Marital problems 

Child adjustment or management problems 
Adolescent adjustment or management problems 
Growth and development issues 

Sources of referral 
Self 

Friends and family 
Physicians and hospitals 
Schools 

Mental health professionals & agencies 

Public service agencies 

Clergy 

Lawyers, courts and police 
Number of families terminating treatment - 10 
SERVICE : 

Number of scheduled counseling & therapy sessions 
Average per month - 164.5 

Number of cancellations 

13.7% cancellation rate 

Number of group sessions 

Consultation and education services 

Specific agency or grou p 
Wilmington Regional Health Center 
Department of Social Services 
Mass. Division of Social Services 
Wilmington Public Schools 
Wilmington Public Schools 
Head Start Parents' Group 
Mystic Valley Mental Health Center 
Partial Hospitalization Program 



Contract 



121 



71 



23 



31% 
16% 
12% 
15% 
26% 



31% 
26% 
11% 
17% 
3% 
3% 
8% 
1% 



88 



1469 



183 



18 



Service 

Community Education 
Case Consultation 
Case Consultation 
Case Consultation 
Case Conference 
Community Education 

Case Consultation 



Other 



49 



19 



15 



32 



506 



89 



Total 



170 



90 



38 



120 



1975 



272 



18 



Time 



hr. 
hr. 
hr. 



12 hrs. 
3 hrs. 
2 hrs. 



4 hrs. 



32 



1.4. Wilmington Family Counseling Service. Inc . (continued) 



9% increase in 1980 in number of scheduled counseling 
Parent Group and two Learning To Be Assertive classes 
previous year. 



and therapy sessions. In addition to the Single 
were provided that had not been provided the 



Cost to Town for scheduled appointment: $6.44 

decreased 11% from $ 7.21 in 1979 
decreased 39% from $10.50 in 1978 
decreased 54% from $14.10 in 1977 
decreased 67% from $19.67 in 1976 



For every $1.00 the Town contributed Wilmington residents received $5.00 in service. 



Veterans' Agent 



Veterans' Services is governed by the General Laws of Massachusetts, Chapter 115, as amended, with strict 
:ompliance to this Chapter, the rules and policies of which govern the disbursement of aid. Benefits are for 
:he needy Veteran and his immediate family who have been subject to unforseen needs. Final approval of 
jenefits comes from the Commissioner of Veterans' Services, Boston, Massachusetts 

The balance for the first six months of 1980 from previous appropriation was $11,502.04. A balance of 
?4,293.41 remaining June 30, 1980. Total available funds beginning July 1, 1980 was $20,000.00. Total 
expended for aid to Veterans and their families for the entire year 1980 was $11,556.59. 

Total reimbursement for 1980 from settled assignments and/or accident cases authorized by the Commissioner's 
Dffice was $5,622.55. Because 50% of the amount authorized by the Commissioner's Office is shared by the 
Town, the Town's share on assignment cases was $2,811.28. The total amount of $5,622.55 has been turned over 
to the Town Treasurer, and the Commonwealth has been notified so adjustments of any monies can be made before 
State reimbursement to the Town. 

This department deals continuously with new and changing benefits and/or laws pertaining to Social Security, 
V.A. Disabilities, Pension, Compensations and G.I. Education or on the job training; plus, aiding applicants 
for S.S.I. , unemployment due to strikes, shutdowns and lack of work, always has an impact on expenditures. 
Case load varies from time to time. 

The appropriation for 1980 and six months of 1981 $20,000.00 as voted at the Annual Town Meeting, a balance 
of $17,627.84 forwarded for the first six months of 1981. 



33 



Planning Board 



The past year has been very active for the Wilmington Planning Board. The issues, events and problems have 
and continue to be a challenge to each of the Board members. 

The Planning Board, (consisting of five active members), continue to meet every Tuesday evening in the Town 
Hall Annex, except during the Summer months. At that time, our meetings are held every other Tuesday. The 
Planning Board office is open and supervised by our Planning Coordinator four days per week. 

General Planning 

A concern for housing continues to be of importance. Recognizing the need for housing including all income 
levels and varied ages, again the Planning Board revised and re-introduced the Planned Residential Development 
By-Law. With disappointment, the article for amendment , lost by a very narrow margin. 

The Planning Board, upon the request of the Wilmington Housing Authority, reviewed the sites submitted to the j 
Board and made a thorough and complete report listing recommendations of these locations for the proposed 
elderly and low income housing. 

A continued support for the HUD Community Block Grant Program was given to the Assistant Town Manager's Grant 
Application. The Board shall continue to be of assistance in these endeavors. 

Throughout the past year, the Planning Board has been called upon to assist in many Special Meetings concern- ! 
ing conditions of difficult resolution. The townspeople and various boards and commissions were the main 
interest of the Planning Boards efforts to resolve these concerns. We have served you to the fullest in all 
these capacities and will continue to do so in the future. 

A new series of efforts shall be oncoming from the Planning Board. The concerns are many and complicated for 
our Town. It is the Boards desire to work with Selectmen, Town Administration and other Boards and Commission, 
and all interested citizens of Wilmington on projects and programs • to help insure Wilmington of some security 
safety and comfort in these sometimes harsh progressive times. 

Some of the concerns have come about by way of contracting a Professional Planning Consultant. His knowledge 
in the planning services have verified much that was known or expected by the Board. A contract for an over- 
view of growth and development was undertaken between Mr. Kevin Hurley and the Planning Board. This is nothinj 
more than an update of the Master Plan of Wilmington, which has not realistically been done in the past decade 
There shall be much more coming in the future regarding these efforts to employ some of the knowledge passed 
on to us. 

It is a concern of the Planning Board however, that Proposition 2 1/2 will alter the budget for the years to 
come. The efforts of following through with some of these projects and programs no doubt, shall be hampered. 
The effect will be also lessened. Nevertheless, the Planning Board is committed to improvement. 

Subdivisions and Plans - 1980 

The Planning Board continues with its subdivisions and plans. In the year 1980, 63 plans were submitted to 
the Board, believed not to require approval under the subdivision control law. The Planning Board endorsed 
55 of these applications, disapproved 3, took no action on 2 and the remaining were withdrawn without prejudice 

During 1980, the Planning Board received two (2) Subdivision Plans. One being a revised modified definitive 
of Jewel Industrial Park, which was approved with 32 conditions. Most recently, a preliminary 14 lot residen- 
tial subdivision was submitted. The Board shall soon make a decision upon it. 

In accordance with the Zoning By-Law Section IV-3 "Off Street Parking", the Board reviewed and made recommen- 
dations to the Town Engineer on 14 Parking Site Plans. 

To Summarize, the Planning Board would like to thank the Town Engineer, Planning Coordinator, our State 



34 



Representative and all others who have assisted the Planning Board in all its transactions and dealings 
concerning the welfare of our Town. Their assistance has been much appreciated. 



The Planning Board Members shall continue attending meetings, giving Seminars, advising and assisting those 
who request our aid in whatever capacity necessary for the Town and its people. 



Highway Department 



All the regular highway maintenance work was carried out during the year, such as patching streets, cleaning 
i catch basins, sweeping streets, installing street and warning signs, scraping back roads, picking up trash 

along our roadsides, cutting brush along our roadsides, replacing broken curbing, painting and replacing 
I guardrails, etc. 

Sidewalk Construction : 
I A short section of sidewalk was constructed on Glen Road near Dobson Street. 

I Drainage : 

Drainage systems were installed, repaired or extended on the following streets: Swain Road, Adams Street, 
Salem Street, Roberts Road, Glendale Circle, Marion Street, Wilson Street, Boutwell Street, Middlesex Avenue, 
Westdale Avenue, and Aldrich Road. 

In addition to the above, the Town meeting appropriated $82,000, Article 25 by petition, to enlarge the cul- 
verts at Woburn and Federal Streets. These areas were subject to complete flooding, causing considerable 
hardship to the residents. With the installation of these larger aluminum culverts, it will not eliminate 
the flooding completely, but it should help considerably. 

Snow and Ice Removal : 

The winter of 1980 the Highway Department recorded 16" of snow. 

The Town of Wilmington received a State funded salt storage shed. This shed can prove to be an invaluable 
benefit to our community in further protection of our drinking waters. I would like to take this opportunity 
to thank everyone who assisted the Highway Department in getting this salt shed. 

Roadside Rubbish Pickup : 

This year as in the past, we cleaned our roadsides of rubbish on a continuous basis through the months of 
May, June, July and August, with the use of C.E.T.A. personnel. This is a Federally funded program. 

Brooks and Streams : 

As in the past years we used C.E.T.A. personnel, a Federally funded program, for our streams and brooks 
maintenance. 

Equipment : 

I have checked over the equipment and sincerly conclude that we must replace 1 dump truck and 1 pickup truck. 

In concluding my report, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Police Department for keeping us 
informed during the winter months of the road conditions between the hours of 3:00 and 6:30 a.m., weekdays, 
Sundays and holidays; the Water, Tree, Cemetery and Engineering Departments for their help during snow storms, 
and various departments for the cooperation extended this department during 1980. I would also like to thank 
the Town Manager, Assistant Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their support throughout the year. 
Last, but not least, to the men of the Highway Department who made 1980 a very productive year, my sincere 
thanks and appreciation. 



35 



Recreation Commission 



With leisure time on the increase, and with people intensifying their search for more purposeful and self- 
fulfilling pursuits, the community recreation agency finds itself in the critical role of providing currently 
acceptable outlets for pleasureable recreation experiences. 

People are in need of a variety of activities that present a challenge, or an opportunity for accomplishment, 
satisfaction or just plain fun. 

With this purpose in mind, the Wilmington Recreation Department is constantly striving to deliver constructive 
and diversified recreation activities to the community with minimal impact on local expenditures. 

The Recreation Department, in its tenth year with a full-time director, presents the following information on 
1980 programs and activities. 

YOUTH PROGRAMS 

Summer Playgrounds : The seven playgrounds ran for a seven week period on a Monday through Friday basis from 
9 am to 3 pm. The playgrounds are for age 6 through 12 and are located at school sites. Each playground was 
staffed with three leaders and a federally subsidized Summer Youth Employment Program Aide. Individual play- 
grounds were responsible for implementing a wide variety of recreational activities for their children. Included 
as part of each playground's program were: arts and crafts, interplayground competition, tennis, field trips, 
special events, family night cookouts, sports and games, tournaments and pool days. Special events included 
the Hersey Track and Field Meet at Wilmington with finalists going to Braintree for the State Meet, Sand 
Castle Sculpture Contests at Crane's Beach. Other Special Events that also took place during the playground 
season were: the Knights of Columbus Soap Box Derby and Olympics, Flag Football Tourney, Simmons Croquet Open, 
Horseshoe Tourney, Tennis Tourney, Police Association Beach and Swim Day, a Penny Carnival at the Wildwood 
Playground with the proceeds once again going to the Jimmy Fund, Whiffle Ball Tourney, and the "Little Red 
Wagon" on the Common. 

Tiny Tots : This summer pre-school enrichment program, in its 4th year of operation again proved to be very, 
popular. The Buzzell School served as the primary facility for the three, two week sessions. Each session 
met each day, Monday through Friday, for its two week duration. The program was staffed by two supervisors, 
several federally funded youth employees plus volunteers. Activities included games, songs, music, drama, arts 
and crafts, field trips, special events, graduation day on the Common and a concluding family night extrava- 
ganza at Silver Lake. 

Special Needs : Our summer program for special children is held at Camp 40 Acres. Over 50 youngsters enjoyed 
this fine wooded facility. The program ran for seven weeks on a Monday through Friday basis, 9 am to 2 pm. 
Our staff consisted of thirteen supervisors and leaders plus fifteen federal helpers and many volunteers. 
Activities included were active and quiet games, music, arts and crafts, field trips, special events, swimming, 
pool days, cookouts, reading and an overnight campout. Organizations which helped sponsor special events were 
the Sons of Italy, Kiwanis, Elks, Rotary and the Maintenance Department employees. 

Teen Center : The former Walker School at Rotary Park housed our sixth summer teen center program. The 6 week 
program for grades 7 to 12 consisted of games, tournaments, field trips, special events, field hockey clinics, 
pool, ping pong plus general socializing. Operating hours were 4 pm to 10 pm on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday 
and 9 am to 12 noon on Friday. Wednesday was field trip day. 

Baseball : 21 game schedule in the northern division of the league. The team placed second in their division 
thus entitling it to participate in the concluding tournament. All home games were played on the High School 
field during their playing season which ran from June through July. 

Solf ball : During the summer months of May, June, July and August, girls between the ages of 13 and 16 played 
softball in our intra-town league. Approximately 100 girls participated in this 6 team intra-town league. 



36 



Games were played at the Town Park and at the Shawsheen School on Tuesdays and Saturdays. Each team played a 
15 game schedule and in a final single elimination tournament. The traveling team played in the northern 
division of league with home games being played on Tuesday and Friday evenings at the Town Park. This team 
won their division and advanced in the playoffs before losing to Wakefield in a 2 out of 2 series. 

Six teams of boys, ages 13 to 17 formed our intra-town "one pitch" league. Over 100 boys participated this 
year. Their games were played on Saturday mornings and Sunday afternoons at the High School's Junior Varsity 
Field. They played a 10 game schedule with playoffs concluding in June. All the coaches in this league and 
our other sport leagues volunteered their services. 

Town Beach : Residents of all ages made use of the Silver Lake beaches during the unusually hot summer. 
Qualified lifeguards supervised the public beach seven days a week from June through Labor Day. The town is 
fortunate to have such a valuable natural recreation asset within its borders. 

Swimming Lessons : The Recreation Department once again used the fine swimming facilities at the Shawsheen 
Tech Pool throughout the year for Youth Red Cross lessons, adult swim and family swim. Swimming lessons were 
also held at Silver Lake. Classes there included beginners, advanced beginner, intermediate, water safety 
aide and advanced life saving. Over 200 youths were involved in these summer lessons. Our entire lesson 
programs is extremely beneficial as more and more people are becoming involved in water oriented recreation. 

Canoeing : The Recreation Department offered Red Cross Canoeing lessons in July and August at Silver Lake. 
The classes were for ages 12 and up. Boy Scouts, adults and others have taken advantage of this aquatic skill 
course. There were town canoes available for rental at the lake too. 

Baseketball : In its 17th year this expansive winter league registered over 500 boys and girls ages 9 and up. 
There were 3 youth divisions and a men's league. Games during the season, which ran from December through 
March, were played on Monday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings plus most of the day on Saturday and Sunday. 
Approximately 100 volunteers served as coaches and officials for this league. 

Girls' teams practiced on Wednesday evenings from 6:00 to 8:00 pm in the North Intermediate Gym and Thursdays 
in the High School gym. 

Women practiced in the same gym from 8:00 to 9:30 pm. Boys' teams practiced in the West Intermediate School 
Gym on Thursdays from 6:00 to 8:00 pm while the men practiced in that gym from 8:00 to 10:00 pm. 

There were clinics for the squirt boys and girls in December, January and February. The clinics were run by 
volunteers. 

Tennis Lessons : These popular lessons were for adults on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. The youth lessons 
were for ages 9 through 16 and were held on Saturday mornings. The program is held at the North. There are 
three sessions. The program runs from June into August. 

Gymnastics : There was a spring course running for 8 weeks on Saturdays in the High School Gym. This was for 
girls ages 4 through 12. The summer program consisted of 4 classes which met on Tuesdays for 6 weeks in the 
Wilmington High School Gym. The fall program ran for 10 weeks on Saturdays, also in the same gym. 

Baton : Our young twirlers enjoyed a 10 week winter program and a 10 week spring program. The classes met on 
Saturdays. There was a 10 week fall program also. The girls march as a unit in surrounding parades. 

Soccer : Our two spring soccer teams for boys competed in the Middlesex Youth Soccer League. The A team for 
boys ages 15 and under played on Saturdays. The season ran from April through mid-June with home games being 
played at the Shawsheen School. 

The Instructional program for grades 1 to 6 taught basic fundamentals to over 200 boys. The program was con- 
ducted by volunteers and was held on Saturdays at the Shawsheen School. 

Santa's Workshop : Over 300 good little boys and girls visited Santa and his elves at their Workshop in the 
former Town Hall Annex. Good little boys and girls were able to sit on Santa's lap and receive a color snap- 
shot with Santa. They also received a candy cane, a helium filled Christmas balloon. All donations received 
during the program were sent to Globe Santa. 

Ski Lessons : This was a self supporting program for boys and girls in grades 4 to 6. The program consisted 
of 5 Wednesday afternoon classes at Boston Hills in North Andover. Over fifty skiers of varying abilities took 



37 



part in this very successful program. On the last day of class, races were held at the ski area. 



Ski Trip : The Recreation Department sponsored a field trip to Colorado over the February vacation. Thirty- 
two high school skiers accompanied the three chaperones on a ski adventure to the Rockies. The group enjoyed 
the plentiful snow, ample food, very fine accommodations and powder skiing unique to the area. 

Flag Football : This program for boys in grades A to 6 ran on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons behind the 
Shawsheen School. It ran for 7 weeks in September, October and November. 

Others : The Recreation Department either sponsored or participated in the following programs for Wilmington 
youth: Vacation programs, Edaville Railroad family trip, Ice Capades family trip, teen concerts, public skat- 
ing, Junior Winter Carnival, Punt Pass & Kick, Fun Runs, Horribles Parade, Easter Egg Hunt, Aquatonics Day, 
Memorial Races, Student Government Day, ski trips, snorkeling clinic and scuba lessons, Celtics trips and a 
variety of July 4th activities. 

ADULT PROGRAMS 



Men' s Open Gym : Men, over 18, were able to take part in an informal gym program on Thursday evenings from 
8:00 to 10:00 pm in the West Intermediate School Gym. This usually well attended program runs from November 
through March. 

Basketball : There were 9 teams and the men competed in a separate league within the Basketball League. Theii 
games were played in the High School Gym on Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings. The season begai 
in December and lasted through March. 

Ladies Open Gym : On Wednesday evenings in the North Intermediate Gym from 8:00 to 9:30. Ladies, ages 18 and 
over had the use of the gym. Informal basketball was the activity provided. The program ran from early 
December through March. 

The program included men over 35 toward the end in February and March. 

Co-Ed Volleyball : This popular co-ed adult program ran on Thursday evenings from 7:30 to 9:30 pm in the Nortt 
Intermediate School Gym. The program ran from January through March and was well attended. 

Softball : At the Town Park a very active and successful men's Softball league was conducted over the summer. 
This entire program is supervised and conducted by volunteers spending much valuable time to keep this a very 
successful program. 

Yoga : There was an 8 week winter program, a 6 week spring class and a 10 week fall class. The classes were 
held on Tuesdays in the Glen Road School. There were beginner and continuing classes for adults. 

Ladies Slimnastics : This is a very popular exercise program for the ladies. There was a 12 week winter pro- 
gram, a 6 week spring program and a 10 week fall program. The classes were held on Monday and Wednesday in 
the West Intermediate School from 7 to 8 pm. 

Aerobics : This very popular program for ladies consisted of a 12 week winter program, a 6 week spring program 
and a 10 week fall program. The class met for an hour at the West Intermediate School on Monday and Wednesday 
evenings . 

Raft Trip : A group of Wilmington adults took to the Maine Woods in an exciting Whitewater raft trip down the 
Kennebec River. This self supported adventure took place on July 9. 

Concerts : The Recreation Department scheduled 8 concerts throughout the warm months. Most of the concerts 
were held on Tuesdays. Local companies and civic groups helped defray the costs. 

Universal : The Rotary Club donated a Universal Exercise Machine to the Town. There was a 10 week morning 
program, a 10 week evening program in the winter. There was a 6 week evening program in the spring. Both 
men and women utilized these programs. 

Others : Additional adult programs involving the Recreation Department included: fun runs, running clinics, 
other races, adult swim canoe rental and lessons, Memorial Races, Celtics games, tennis lessons, public 
skating, scuba and snorkeling, public beach use, field trips and July 4th activities centering around the 
Common . 



38 



Community Youth Programs : Several youth organizations in town received partial financial support through the 
Recreation Department budget. These excellent programs are run by interested volunteers who devote their time 
in helping our young people receive instruction and fun through recreation activity. These organizations are: 
youth hockey, figure skating, youth football, soccer, tennis club, pony league and senior little league. 




39 



Historical Commission 



The year 1980 marked the 250th anniversary of the incorporation of the Town of Wilmington, and the Historical 
Commission worked with extra zeal to make this year a notable one. Many projects were undertaken, and we are> 
happy to say that the results have been rewarding. 

In order to better identify some of Wilmington's early homes and structures, Mrs. Cheryl Varey, a Wilmington 
resident, was commissioned to prepare twenty-five historic markers. Some of these hand-lettered signs have 
already been mounted, and the remainder will be put up when the weather becomes more clement. Limited funds 
prevented the Commission from marking all the Wilmington's historic homes, but it is hoped that at a future 
date more signs may be done. 

As always, historic Harnden Tavern has been a focal point of the Commission's energies. This year progress 
has been made in the continuing restoration of this fine example of Georgian architecture. Period reproducti 
lighting fixtures have been specially handcrafted by a modern craftsman using traditional methods. Although 
the fixtures have been electrified for safety purposes, every effort has been made to make them resemble the 
early glow of candlelight. 

After considerable research done by Melinda Murphy at the Society for the Preservation of New England 
Antiquities, appropriate wallpaper for three of the Tavern's period rooms have been chosen. These papers, 
coupled with the paint colors indicated in the color history done two years ago, will recapture the feelings 
of times past at the Tavern. 

Improvements at the Tavern have not been isolated to the interior of the building. Those passing will notice 
that a stonewall and new brick walk now grace the front of the house, setting it off to its best advantage an 
separating it from the rush of traffic on Rt. 62. Both the walk and the wall were constructed by Warren 
Newhouse. 

For those visiting the Tavern, and the numbers have been increasing steadily each year, the Commission has 
prepared a brochure describing the house and giving a brief history of it, as well as its former occupants. 
The brochure also contains an explanation of the purposes and activities of the Friends of Harnden Tavern and 
an application for membership to that organization. 

The continued support of the Friends is always important to the Commission, and this year was no exception. 
All of their activities were actively supported by Commission members, and in September a special garden part 
was given at the Harnden Tavern, jointly sponsored by the Friends and the Commission, to commemorate the Town 
250th Anniversary. Each year the Christmas Social at the Tavern is a bigger success, and this year's was the 
best yet. The Friends outdid themselves with the wonderful decorations using only natural materials, and the 
refreshments, entertainment and crafts room deserve great praise. Proceeds from this and other fund-raising 
events all go towards the furnishing of the Tavern. 

The Commission takes this opportunity to thank the citizens of Wilmington for your continued support, support 
which we will be needing now more than ever. Our budget, along with every other budget, has been drastically 
reduced, and we will need the volunteer cooperation of concerned citizens to continue preservation and res- 
toration efforts both at the Tavern and other historic sites throughout the Town. We urge you to attend our 
Commission meetings held on the second Tuesday of each month at the Harnden Tavern at 7:30 p.m., and anyone 
interested in some "hands-on" restoration experience can obtain more information by calling the Commission 
secretary at 658-5018. 



AO 



Library Trustees 



The Library Trustees of the Wilmington Memorial Library are pleased to make the following report. 

The people of Wilmington are proud of their library as evidenced by their continued support over the years. 
Because of this support, the Wilmington Library is recognized as being one of the best in the state. The 
Director and his Staff are to be commended for their dedication which is the real reason for the prestige 
that Wilmington's Library enjoys. 

The Librarian's report follows along with Library Statistics and as you see from the numbers, the Library 
continues to be a very busy place with an increase of 2,700 patrons. 

The final impact of proposition "2 1/2" was not known at the time that this report was prepared. However, 
be assured that the Trustees of the Library will provide the policy necessary to continue the Library 
services you expect within the resources provided. 

The passage of proposition "2 1/2" was a message given by the taxpayers to Governmental Institutions. They 
want their tax dollars to be needed and when needed to be used prudently. We are sure that, in time, when 
the citizens of the Commonwealth realize that proposition "2 1/2" might have a deleterious effect on some 
town services that they do not want eliminated, then legislation will emerge to correct the situation. 

In the meantime, we as Trustees will be as innovative as possible. These innovations will include but not 
be limited to, hours of operation, circulation policy, fees for some services and the possibility of some 
form of volunteer organization. 

Be assured, your Library Trustees will continue to serve the needs of the people of Wilmington. 




41 



Library Director 

In accordance with the statutes of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the By-Laws of the Town of 
Wilmington, I hereby submit my annual report with its accompanying statistics for the calendar year 1980: 

A report on the book security system is in order. It was installed at a cost of $28,000 in 1978. Memorial 
Library staff inventories indicate that the library has experienced a 91.3% reduction in book losses over 
this two year period. Regretably, the library had been experiencing a $12,000 yearly loss. One effect has 
been a theoretical savings of $21,912 in library materials not mysteriously disappearing, or otherwise un- 
accountable. This figure added to the two year budgetary reduction of $15,150 brings the "savings" to 
$37,062, or $9,062 more than the installation cost of the system. So, it is a pleasure to report that the 
book security system has more than paid for itself as well as having saved the taxpayer money by reducing 
losses. Beyond the economics involved, it is a further pleasure to report that the library has successfully I 
reduced its vulnerability to theft of its materials. 

However, inflation took its toll of the library's purchasing power. This lack of purchasing power resulted 
in a reduced variety, of new materials available to the public. This condition, and the reduced amount of new 
materials that the Library has been able to purchase has been observed and commented upon by the Library's 
patrons. It ought to be remembered that the Library's book budget had remained frozen at $57,300 for three 
years. In 1979, and again in 1980, this amount was further reduced by $7,575 due to the installation of the i 
book security system, and despite inflationary increases of 129% for all hardcover books published in the 
United States from the base period 1967-1968 to 1978. 

Last year's annual report discussed the library's dependence on local tax support, and its increased vulner- 
ability to cutting back. Tension, uncertainty, and introspection dominated 1980 with the passage of 
"Proposition 2 1/2". Historically in Wilmington, the economics and concerns of the Memorial Library have bee 
handled without much fervor. The mandate of "Proposition 2 1/2" will necessitate a discussion of public ex- | 
pectations. Wilmington has traditionally supported its library service well as its library performed its 
classic role of serving the educational, informational, recreational, and cultural needs of the Town. As 
the Memorial Library approaches the uncertainties of 1981, a reaffirmation is in order to stress again the 
obligation to provide reference service while meeting the recreational and cultural needs of our diverse 
clientele. "Proposition 2 1/2" challenges the fundamentals of public library service, and mandates an 
examination of values and principles. The future of the Memorial Library dominated by "Proposition 2 1/2" 
remains unclear and uncertain. 

However, despite the fact of "Proposition 2 1/2", there is an equal reality that Wilmington's expectations 
are again ever increasing. The use by a diverse clientele of the Memorial Library, its materials and 
services is escalating. 2,700 new borrowers were registered in 1980. This represents an increase of 29% 
over the previous year. 

How the challenge of the dichotomy between "Proposition 2 1/2" and increased public expectations for library 
service isJmet, will determine the immediate future of the Wilmington Memorial Library. 



I 

li 



4 2 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 



74,084 
2,693 
33 
11 
265 
195 
273 
8 



3 
97 
891 
620 



ate of founding: 
ibrary Director: 
umber of days open during 1980 
ours open each week: 

otal holdings as of December 31, 1980: 
Books 

A/V materials 
Microform 
Newspapers 
Periodicals 
Art prints 
Realia 

Museum passes 
umber of volumes beginning of the year: 
umber of volumes purchased during the year: 
umber of volumes added as gifts: 
umber of volumes withdrawn during the year: 
WM (Missing from library) : 
WLO (Long overdue) : 
WW (Worn/damaged) : 
WD (Dated) : 
umber of volumes as of December 31, 1980: 
opulation: 1980 Town Census 
irculation: 1980 

Adult: 75,077 Children: 47,409 
Museum passes: 932 A/V: 7,830 
Periodicals: 512 Art prints: 609 
lirculation per capita: 
etrospective circulation totals: 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 

irculation control statistics: 

Number of adult reserves processed: 
Number of overdue notices sent: 
Number of bills sent: 
Number of overdue items involved: 
Number of bill items involved: 
Registered library patrons: 
otal reference and reader service statistics for 1980 
Retrospective reference and reader services for 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 

nterlibrary loans: 

ILL material requested from other libraries: 
ILL material received from other libraries: 
ILL material loaned to other libraries: 
ppropriations and income for 1980: 
er capita expenditures: 
unds transferred to Town Treasurer: 

Payment for lost library materials: $ 519.30 
Payment received for service chgs: 1,692.00 
Payment for lost borrowers cards: 87.00 
Postage refund: 54.53 
Book order refund: 37.51 



1871 

Philip W. Meriam 
293 
69 

77,562 



71,232 
4,280 
183 
- 1,611 



74,084 
18,200 
137,169 



7.54 

117,612 
113,343 
117,352 
129,828 
138,380 

2,520 
10,301 

1,718 
24,467 

3,478 
11,992 

8,094 

3,689 
3,739 
5,522 
6,006 
6,744 

126 
98 


$219,882 
$12.09 
$2,390.34 



43 



Town Counsel 



In accordance with the requirements of the Town By-Laws, I submit herewith my report as Town Counsel coveri 
the year 1980. 

(a) On January 1, 1980, there were pending the following actions by or against the Town (exclusive 
of actions in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, and in which it had no interest, and of tax li 
foreclosure proceedings in the Land Court and petitions for abatement before the Appellate Tax Board*) . 

Beatrice G. Swenson v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (petition for assessment of 

damages for land taking) . 

Harvey Lobdell v. Board of Appeals, Middlesex Superior Court (petition in equity for appeal for varian 

by zoning by-laws) . 

Androniki Gaglione v. Thomas B. Brennan, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (petition for assessment of 

damages) . 

Joseph Scaro, etal v. County of Middlesex, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (petition for assessment of 

damages for land taking) . 

John E. Hayward, etal v. County of Middlesex, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (petition for assessment 

of damages for land taking) • 

John E. Hayward, etal v. County of Middlesex, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (petition for assessment 

of damages for land taking) . 

Robert Stevens, Tr. v. Town of Wilmington and Planning Board, Land Cour t (petition for registration an( 

claim to Swain Court - private way) . 

Richard D. Zambernardi, etal v. Town of Wilmington Board of Selectmen, Middlesex Superior Court (suit 
in equity for declaratory judgment to determine the validity of betterment assessment). 

Robert J. Corey v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Land Court (petition to register title). 

Town of Wilmington v. Oxford Associates, Inc., Middlesex Superior Court (claims to recover motor vehic; 

excise taxes) . 

Harry S. Sukeforth, etals, Trs. v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court 

(petition for assessment of damages) . 

Rita D. Martini, Ex. (Else M. Lanois) v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (petition for 

for assessment of damages for land taking) . 

Sanborn Brothers, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell (action for property damage - 

negligence) . 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Appeals Court (bill of compliance for declaratory 
relief as to the validity of assessment of sewer use charges, for recovery of damages and for injunctive 

relief) . 

George Anderson, etal v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (claim 

for personal injury). 

School Teacher v. Wilmington School Committee, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (complaint of 

discrimination as to benefits). 

44 



John J. Lyons, etal v. Town of Wilmington, Land Court (complaint to determine validity and extent of the 
ing by-laws of the Town of Wilmington) . 

George W. Lloyd, etal v. Jackson Brothers, Inc., etal, Middlesex Superior Court (complaint for alleged 
ages resulting from diversion of water). 

Town of Wilmington v. Frank C. Powers, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (petition for contempt for failure 
comply with final decree) . 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (petition for abatement of 
er betterment assessment) . 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (petition for abatement of 
er use charge) . 

Rosaline T. Abi-Ezzi v. Wilmington School Committee, etal, Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination 
aim for payment of maternity benefits). 

Joseph J. Salpietro, etal v. Robert E. Shelley, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (claim for personal injury 
property damage) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Rosnoe Const, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (action to restrain the removal of 
1, loam, sand or gravel from defendant's premises). 

Gibbs Realty and Development Corporation v. Bruce MacDonald, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (appeal 
m decision of Board of Appeals denying building permit) . 

Frances Dec v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (complaint 
eging sex discrimination. 

Dorothy A. Cosman v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (claim for personal injury). 

Fosters Pond Improvement Association, Inc., etals v. Aldo Caira, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (action 
the nature of certiorari for decision of Board of Selectmen granting earth removal permit). 

Ruth J. Gronemeyer, Exec, v. George R. Allan, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (complaint for assessment 
damages) . 

James Rooney v. Sterling C. Morris, etals, Municipal Court of the City of Boston (appeal from decision 
[Civil Service Commission sustaining appointing authority) . 

I Traffic Supervisors (AFSCME, Council 93) and Town of Wilmington, Labor Relations Commission (mediation 
| fact finding) . 

Lucille Costa, etal v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (action for personal injury 
iulting from a motor vehicle accident) . 

George Donovan, etal v. Bruce MacDonald, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (appeal from the decision of the 
Ird of Appeals denying variance to construct a single family dwelling) . 

! George R. Vinal, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (action of quantum meruit to 
lover fair and reasonable value of services provided to Jewell Mfg. Company, Inc. for subdivision road and 
Ulities and/or to reach and apply monies held by the Town of Wilmington). 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co. v. Town of Wilmington, Boston Municipal Court (claim for breach 
(contract) . 

Pacella Bros., Inc. v. Town of Wilmington Water and Sewer Commissioners, American Arbitration Association 
Inand for arbitration on sewer construction project). 

Labor Relations Commission v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (complaint to enforce onier of 
lor Relations Commission) . 



Town of Wilmington v. AFSCME, Council 93, Labor Relations Commission (complaint for declaratory judgmer 

to determine rights) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Labor Relations Commission, Middlesex Superior Court (complaint for judicial revd 

of decision of Labor Relations Commission) . 

*There are pending as of January 1, 1981, 44 separate petitions for abatements before the Appellate Taj 
Board, many involving claims for several different years. 

(b) (1) During the year 1980, the following new actions were brought against the Town of 

Wilmington or its officers or agents: 

Wilmington Town Employees Association (Cemetery and Water Department) v. Town of Wilmington, Labor 
Relations Commission (petition as recognition as unit). 

I.A.F.F., Local 1370 v. Town of Wilmington, American Arbitration Association , (claim for grievance) . 

James Martin v. Walter H. Pierce, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (companion case with Mart:; 
v. Little, claim for services rendered offset by the Town's counterclaim). 

Jean M. Benianati v. Wilmington Public Schools, Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (claim 
for age discrimination) . 

Robert E. Vassallo v. Sterling C. Morris, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (complaint for injunction pri 

hibiting appointment of sergeant). 

Richard D. Jenkins v. James Rooney, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (claim for false arrest and 

conversion) . 

Richard M. Carlson v. Town of Wilmington, Board of Appeals and Scott A. Ferguson, Applicant, Middlesex 
Superior Court (appeal from the decision of the Board of Appeals). 

Custodian v. Town of Wilmington, American Arbitration Association (claim for a grievance) . 

Jeanette F. jverson, etal v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (claim for personal 
injury and consequential damage). 

Paul J. Lynch v. Board of Selectmen of Town of Wilmington, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (complaint 
for declaratory judgment) . 

Warren Atkinson v. Wilmington School Committee, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (appeal under Chapter 7' 

section 43A) . 

Doris Mattucci v. Board of Assessors, Middlesex Superior Court (appeal from Board of Assessors denying 
Clause 18 application for abatement) . 

Paul J. Lynch v. Town of Wilmington, Contributory Retirement Appeal Board (claim for veteran's 
retirement) . 

Mark Cullinane, ppa, etals v. Shawsheen Valley Technical High School District, etals, Middlesex Superi 



Court (claim for personal injuries and consequential damages). 

Eugene Tosto v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell (claim for property damage) . 

Wilmington Town Employees Association (Library), AFSCME v. Town of Wilmington (petition for certificat 
of library personnel) . 

Robert E. Vassallo v. Civil Service Commission, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (appeal of the decisic' 
of the appointing authority). 

Wilmington Town Employees Association v. Town of Wilmington, American Arbitration Association (claim 
for grievance) . 

46 



(b) (2) During the year 1980, the following new actions were brought by or on behalf of the Town. 

Town of Wilmington v. Robert Corey,* aka, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (complaint alleging violation of 
?own Zoning By-Law and Inland Wetland Act) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Stepan Chemical Company, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (removed to 
liddlesex Superior Court) (claim for damages and sewer and water arrearages) . 

(c) During the year 1980, the following actions by or against the Town were disposed of. 

Richard D. Zambernardi, etal v. Town of Wilmington Board of Selectmen, Middlesex Superior Court (disposed 
>f by judgment of the Court ordering the Selectmen to discharge the betterment) . 

Town of Wilmington v. James S. Cooper, etals (Labor Relations Commission), Middlesex Superior Court 
'remanded to Labor Relations Comm. for further hearings) . 

Rita D. Martini, Ex. v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (disposed of by payment of $11,000., 
>ro tanto payment $18,900, previously paid). 

Stepan Chemical Company v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Appeals Court (disposed of after Town's sewer 
ise charges found to be valid, affirmed by the Appeals Court) . 

Robert E. Vassallo v. Sterling C. Morris, etal, Civil Service Commission (decision of the appointing 
uthority affirmed). 

Paul J. Lynch v. Town of Wilmington, Contributory Retirement Appeal Board (decision of CRAB denying 
urisdiction) . 

Richard M. Carlson v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (motion to dismiss filed). 

Wilmington Town Employees Association v. Town of Wilmington, American Arbitration Association 
ssociation (Arbitrator's findings and award that the Town did not violate the Collective Bargaining Agreement). 

Gibbs Realty & Development Corp. v. Bruce MacDonald, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (order remanding 
ase to the Board of Appeals for further hearings). 

Eugene Tosto v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell (disposed of by stipulation of dismissal) . 

Wilmington Town Employees Association v. Town of Wilmington, Labor Relations Commission (disposed of by 
lenial of recognition) . 

Harry S. Sukeforth, etals, Trs. v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court 
disposed of by payment of $10,000, $1,970 previously paid pro tanto). 

Town of Wilmington v. Rosnoe Const. Corp., etal, Middlesex Superior Court (disposed of by judgment for 
ermanent injunction restraining the defendants). 

Mark Cullinane, ppa, etal v. Shawsheen Valley Technical High School District, etal, Middlesex Superior 
j ( 3urt (disposed of by stipulation of dismissal against the Town with prejudice). 

Custodian v. Town of Wilmington, American Arbitration Association (withdrawn by Union) . 

Robert J. Corey v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Land Court (disposed of by stipulation of withdrawal filed 
t f petitioner) . 

Labor Relations Commission v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (disposed of by stipulation 
E dismissal by plaintiff). 

Doris Mattucci v. Board of Assessors, Middlesex Superior Court (dismissed for want of prosecution) . 

Abi-Ezzi v. Wilmington School Committee, etal, Commission Against Discrimination (disposed of by consent 
rder and payment of $2,065.50 to the complainant for claim for maternity leave). 



47 



Wilmington Town Employees Association (Library), AFSCME v. Town of Wilmington, Labor Relations Commission 
(disposed of after hearing before the Commission and petition being dismissed). 

James Martin v. Walter H. Pierce, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (claim for services offset 
by Town' s claim) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Frank C. Powers, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (dismissed because no further known 

violations) . 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (dismissed with prejudice 
for mootness/abatement betterment). 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Company v. Town of Wilmington, Boston Municipal Court (disposed of by 
stipulation of dismissal and payment of $1,574.94 to the plaintiff). 

George W. Lloyd, etal v. Jackson Brothers, Inc., Middlesex Superior Court (disposed of by judgment for 
dismissal after trial before Master and confirmation of Master's report). 




New culvert for Woburn Street. 



^8 



Board of Appeals 



applicant 

Case #1-80 

William Charbonnier 



Case #2-80 
Arthur Drew 



Case #3-80 

Dominic & Pearl Corella 



Case #4-80 
James Chin 



Case #5-80 

Robert K & Shirley 

Jackson, Jr. 



Case #6-80 

John 0. & Ruth M. Webb, Jr. 



Case #7-80 
Bernard Grodzinsky 



Case #8-80 

Richard and Paula Whitney 



Case #9-80 

Edward S. Anderson 



Reason for Appeal Decision 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, (Schedule 
of Requirements) to allow an existing dwelling 
to remain within a required reserve front yard. 



Granted 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, (Schedule 
of Requirements) authorizing the construction of 
a single family dwelling on a lot having in- 
sufficient frontage and depth. 



Granted 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, (Schedule 
of Requirements) to subdivide a lot into two non- 
conforming lots each having insufficient front 
and depth, with a common right of way, for property 
located on Clark Terrace. 



Denied 



To acquire a special permit pursuant to Section III- 
6-C authorizing a bulling permit for a single family 
residential dwelling on a lot located within a 
Flood Plain District for property located on Adams 
Street. 



Granted 



To acquire a special permit authorizing the exten- 
sion of a non-conforming building (too close to the 
lot line) . 



Granted 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule 
of Requirements) to allow an existing dwelling 
to remain within a required reserve yard. 



Granted 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with 
Section III-3-B.5 authorizing additional sign area 
for property located at 581 Main Street. 



Granted 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule 
of Requirements) authorizing the construction of 
an addition within a required reserve side yard. 



Granted 



To acquire a variance from Section IV-1 and Section 
V-l, authorizing the construction of a single family 
dwelling on a lot having insufficient permanent means 
of access and less than the required area for prop- 
erty located at 16R Pinewood Road. 



Denied 



49 




Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #10-80 

Edward T. McLaughlin 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule 
of Requirements) of the Zoning By-Law authorizing 
a building permit for an Industrial building on a 
lot having insufficient frontage and depth for 
Industrial use for property located on Concord St. 



Granted 



Case //11-80 

Bobby and Lydia Stewart 



To acquire a special permit authorizing the ex- 
tension of a non-conforming building (too close to 
the lot line). 



Granted 



Case #12-80 
Andrew G. McCrea 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with 
Section III-3-B-5 authorizing one (1) sq. ft. of 
sign area for each linear foot of frontage of the 
Principal Public Way, for property located on 
Middlesex Avenue. 



Granted 



Case #13-80 
Carol J. Mayfield 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule 
of Requirements) authorizing the construction of 
an addition within a required reserve front, side 
and rear yards. 



Granted 



Case #14-80 
Richard and Karen 
MacMillan 



To acquire a special permit authorizing the ex- 
tension of a non-conforming building (too close 
to the lot line. 



Granted 



Case #15-80 

Analog Devices, Inc. 



To acquire a variance from Section IV- 3A Para. 1, 
sub-sect. IV- 3A, 7 & 8 (off-street parking require- 
ments) and Section 11-10 (definition of a parking 
space) . 



Granted 



Case #16-80 
Kenneth M. Budd 



Case #17-80 
Dorothy Pyne 



Case #18-80 
Patricia S. McKenzie 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule 

of Requirements) to erect an addition to an existing 

dwelling within a reserve rear yard. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
III-l-B-1, authorizing the conversion of a single 
family dwelling and separate professional office into 
a two family dwelling. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow an 
existing dwelling to remain situated as is, on a non- 
conforming lot. 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



Case #19-80 
Edward Mclnnis 



To acquire a special permit in compliance with Section 
VI-1D, authorizing the removal of a non-conforming 
structure and the subsequent substitution thereof, 
with a new single family dwelling for property located 
at 1 Hobson Avenue. 



Denied 



50 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #20-80 
Ronald Fournier 



To acquire a special permit in compliance with 
Section VI-1D, authorizing the enlargement of a 
non-conforming building. 



Granted 



Case #21-80 

Michael J. & Janet M. 

Sullivan 

Case #22-80 
William Jansen 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to erect 
a garage within a required reserve side yard. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule 
of Requirements) to erect a swimming pool within 
a required reserve rear yard. 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #23-80 

Richard & Claire Sparks 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule 
of Requirements) to allow an existing dwelling to 
remain within a required reserve front and side 
yard. 



Granted 



Case #24-80 

Richard J. & Vera Pozzi 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule 
of Requirements) to erect a garage within a re- 
quired reserve side yard. 



Granted 



Case #25-80 

Robert and Jacqueline 

Arzilli 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule 
of Requirements) to construct a single family 
dwelling on a lot having insufficient depth, 
front and area, for property located on 3 Nunn Rd . 



Granted 



Case #26-80 

Town of Wilmington 



To acquire a special permit in compliance with Section 
Vl-D, (non-conforming uses) authorizing the storage 
of a sand/salt mixture for ice and snow control within 
the Town, Middlesex Avenue (Cemetery Grounds) . 



Granted 



Case #27-80 

Stanley Gorski, Agent 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an 
addition within a required reserve yard area, for 
property located at 1 Fairmeadow Road. 



Granted 



Case #28-80 
Francis P. LaRocque 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, (Schedule 
of Requirements) to allow the construction of an 
in-ground swimming pool within a required reserve 
side and rear yard. 



Granted 



Case #29-80 

Stephen F. Lawrenson 



To acquire a special permit in compliance with 
Section V1-1D, (non-conforming uses) authorizing 
the alteration of an existing non-conforming sign, 
for property lcoated at 500 Main Street. 



Granted 



Case #30-80 

Scott Ferguson, Agent 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule 
of Requirements) to allow for the construction of a 
single family dwelling on a lot having insufficient 
frontage and depth, for property located on 402 
Andover Street. 



Granted 



51 



Applicant 

Case #31-80 
Lester Smith 



Case #32-80 
Joseph A. Langone 



Case #33-80 
Robert J. Cain 



Case #34-80 
David J. Fuller 



Case #35-80 
Edith P. Jaquith 



Case #36-80 

John T. & Linda M. Strob 



Case #37-80 

Kenneth L. Corum, Agent 



Case #38-80 
Dorothy L. Cantino 



Case #39-80 
Andrew T. Philbin 



Reason for Appeal 



To acquire a special permit pursuant to Section 
Vl-l.D, authorizing the erection an addition to a 
non-conforming building. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
III-3-B.5, authorizing an increase in allowable sign 
area, for property located at 375 Main Street. 



To acquire a special permit in compliance with Section 
III-3-B.5, authorizing the erection of additional 
sign area. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) for a parcel of land having insufficient 
front and depth. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow an existing dwelling to re- 
main within a required reserve side yard. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the erection of a garage 
within a required reserve side and rear yard. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the sub-division of land 
into two parcels having sufficient area, but less 
than the required depth, frontage and setback 
requirements. 



To acquire a special permit, pursuant to Section 
VI-l.D authorizing the erection of an addition to 
a non-conforming building. 



To acquire a variance authorizing the erection of 
additional sign area within a required reserve yard 
area. 



Decision 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #40-80 

Robert and Joan Riley 



Case #41-80 

Edward P. & Martha White 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow for the installation of a 
swimming pool within the required reserve rear yard. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the sub-division of land 
into several parcels having sufficient area, but less 
than the required depth, frontage and set-back re- 
quirements, for property located at 41, 41A and 41B 
Lake Street. 



Withdrawn 



Granted 



52 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #42-80 

John W. and Viola M. 

Faulkner 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow an existing dwelling to re- 
main within a required reserve front and side 7 yard. 



Granted 



Case #43-80 
Peter DeGennaro 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with 
Section III-3-B.5, authorizing additional sign area 
for property located at 220 Lowell Street. 



Granted 



Case #44-80 

Richard Bertrand, Jr. 



Case #45-80 
Robert C. Dickeson 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a 
garage within a required reserve side yard. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow an existing dwelling to re- 
main within a required reserve front yard. 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #46- 
Donald B. 
Woods 



80 

& Margaret P. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the sub-division of a 
parcel of land into two non-conforming lots both 
having sufficient area, but insufficient frontage 
and depth. Also authorizing the construction of an 
additional single family dwelling. 



Denied 



Case #47-80 
Margaret Curran 



Case #48-80 
K. A. Skotland 



To acquire a special permit in compliance with 
Section Vl-l.D, authorizing the alteration of non- 
conforming signs for property located at 95 Main St. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
III-4-B-5, authorizing the construction of a building 
for the repair of fork-lift trucks and similar 
equipment for property located at 155 West Street. 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #49-80 
John P. Auger 



Case #50-80 
George F. Revelas 



Case #51-80 
Rte. 93 Realty Trust 
Domenic Passanisi and 
Frank Soracco, Trustees 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow for the installation of a 
swimming pool within the required reserve side and 
rear yards. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to erect a garage within the required 
reserve side yard. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-3 (off-street 
parking) of the Wilmington Zoning By-Laws to allow 
less than the required number of parking spaces and 
to allow parking areas within required set backs 
pursuant to Section V-l and Section V-4 (c & d) for 
property located at 220 Ballardvale Street. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



53 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #52-80 
Dominic Corella and 
Pearl Corella 



Case #53-80 

Joan Maga, Chairperson 
250th Anniversary Committee 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule 
of Requirements) to divide a parcel of land into two 
lots, one of which has insufficient frontage and 
depth for property located on Clark Terrace and 
Washington Street. 



To acquire a special permit in compliance with 
Section Vl-2, allowing a carnival to be held at this 
location (High School Parking Lot) on a temporary 
basis, property located on Church Street. 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #54-80 
Lawrence H. Grant 



Case #55-80 
Ray Fitzmaurice 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule 
of Requirements authorizing the erection of an 
addition within a required reserve side yard. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule 
of Requirements) authorizing the sub-division of 
a parcel of land into one conforming lot and one 
non-conforming lot; the non-conforming lot having 
insufficient frontage and depth, but more than the 
required area, for land located at 269 Ballardvale 
Street. 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #56-80 
Noreen R. Pinkston 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a 
single family dwelling within a required front yard, 
for property located on University St. (formally 
First Street) . 



Granted 



Case #57-80 
Paul R. Welch 



Case #58-80 



Arthur R. & Bette Smith, Jr. 



Case #59-80 



Donald P. Rossi 



Case #60-80 
Mary C. Natoli 



Case #61-80 

Ervyl and Ann Stewart 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an 
addition within a required reserve side yard. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) allowing the construction of a dwell- 
ing on a lot having insufficient depth for property 
located at 81 High Street. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an 
addition within a required reserve side yard. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an 
addition within a required reserve side yard. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l authorizing 
the division of a parcel of land into one conform- 
ing and one non-conforming lot of insufficient 
frontage and depth, but having more than the re- 
quired area. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



54 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #62-80 
Douglas D. Andersen 



Case #63-80 

Almon and Lucy Ramsdell 



Case #64-80 
Francis M. Carreiro 



Case #65-80 

Richard P. Kiesinger 



Case #66-80 
Michael P. Dolan 



Case #67-80 
Gertrude 0. Anderson 



Case #68-80 
Edward D. Harrison 



Case #69-80 
Gerald T. McGrath 



Case #70-80 

Don and Sandra Groves 



Case #71-80 
Dennis Surprenant 



Case #72-80 
Eugene H. Nelson 



Case #73-80 
Avco Corporation 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with 
Section Vl-I, authorizing the extension of a non- 
conforming use (Service Station) . 



Granted 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) of the Zoning By-Law for the division 
of a parcel of land into two lots, one of which has 
insufficient frontage and depth, for property located 
on Wildwood Street. 



Granted 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow an existing garage to remain 
within a required side yard, for property located 
on 5 Oakridge Circle. 



Granted 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an 
addition within a required reserve front and side 
yard . 



Granted 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an 
addition within a required reserve side yard. 



Granted 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to construct a single family dwelling 
on a lot having insufficient frontage, depth, and 
area for property located on Burt Road. 



Denied 



To acquire a special permit in compliance with Section 
III-1-4, authorizing a day-care facility for children. 



Granted 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing an addition within a re- 
quired reserve yard area. 



Granted 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing a garage to remain in a 
reserve yard area. 



Granted 



To acquire permission to enclose an existing carport 
located in a required reserve side yard by virtue 
of a previous variance. 



Granted 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing a garage to remain in a 
reserve side yard. 



Granted 



To acquire a special permit for the temporary use of 
trailers in accordance with Section VI-2. 



Granted 



55 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #74-80 
Joseph DeGiacomo 



Case #75-80 
Wilmington Housing 
Authority 



Case #76-80 

Mary T. & George A. Foley, Jr. 



Case #77-80 
Robert Anderson 



Case #78-80 
Everard H. Eaton 



Case #79-80 

William L. Casey, III 



Case #80-80 

John G. & Bonita Bowen 



Case #81-80 
Frank T. Geysen 



Case #82-80 
Edward C. Hill 



Case #83-80 
Allen J. Salines 



To acquire a special permit for the temporary use 
of a trailer in accordance with Section VI-2, for 
property located at 24 Industrial Way. 



To acquire a special permit from Section III-1-B2, 
and any necessary variances to construct 80 units 
of subsidized housing for senior citizens in ac- 
cordance with turnkey project MA 016-003 for prop- 
erty located at 190 Main Street. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to divide a parcel of land into three 
lots, each of which has insufficient frontage and 
depth for property located on West Street. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an 
addition within a required reserve front yard. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the subdivision of a 
parcel of land into three lots, 137A, 137B, and 
137C and that lot 137A will have an existing build- 
ing within a required reserve side yard and Lot 
137C, having insufficient depth as measured at 
right angles at every point in the minimum lot 
frontage (Section V-5) for property located at the 
corner of Glen Road and Main Street. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an 
addition within a required reserve side yard. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow for the installation of a 
swimming pool within the required reserve side yard. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a 
carport within a required reserve front yard. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow an existing dwelling to re- 
main within a required reserve front yard, for 
property located on Commonwealth Avenue. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l to allow the 
construction of a single family dwelling on a lot 
having insufficient frontage, depth and area for 
property located on Fairmont Avenue. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Withdrawn 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



56 



applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



:ase #84-80 

lompugraphic Corporation 



3ase //85-80 

ienneth J. Miller, Agent 



Case #86-80 
Richard Gustafson 



Case #87-80 

James M. Coull, President 
Channel Building Co., Inc. 



Case #88-80 

Kenneth J. Miller, Agent 



Case #89-80 
Donald Sullivan 



Case #90-80 
John Gearty 



For variances from Section IV, Special Regulations Granted 
Governing Use Districts, Paragraph IV-3 (Off-'Street 
Parking), sub-paragraph A, and Sub-paragraphs 7 & 
8, of the Zonign By-Law wherein one parking space 
is required for each one hundred feet of floor 
area for office occupance and wherein one parking 
space is required for each two hundred square 
feet of floor area for storage and manufacturing 
occupancy, so as to allow the use of 845 parking 
spaces as a combined total for floor area devoted 
to office use or storage and warehouse/manufacturing 
use on property located on Ballardvale Street Con- 
nection, Wilmington. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of Granted 

Requirements) authorizing the subdivision of a 

parcel of land into three lots 137A, 137B & 137C, 

such that lot 137A will have an existing building 

within a required reserve side yard and Lot 137C 

having insufficient depth as measured at right 

angles at every point in the minimum lot frontage 

(Section V-5) for property located on Glen Road 

and Main Street. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of Granted 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a 
garage within a required reserve side yard. 



To obtain a variance from Section V-3 (Off-Street Granted 
Parking) for the Wilmington Zoning By-Law and a 
building permit to allow less than the required 
number of parking spaces and to allow the locating 
of the proposed building and parking areas pursu- 
ant to Section V-l and Section V-4 (c & d) for 
property located on Main Street. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of Granted 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a 
single family dwelling on a lot having insufficient 
frontage and side yard clearance for property 
located on the corner of State and Belmont Streets. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section Withdrawn 
III-4-B-5 authorizing the open storage of passenger 
vehicles excluding salvage operation, for property 
located at 779 Woburn Street. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of Granted 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a 
single family dwelling within a required reserve 
front yard for property located at 1 Oak Street. 



57 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Case #91-80 
Madeline Cutone 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing an addition within a re- 
quired reserve front yard. 



C ase //92-80 

Joanne L. Vilasi, Agent 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a 
single family dwelling within the required reserve 
side yard, for property located on Fairview Avenue. 



Case #93-80 

Rocco V. DePasquale 



To obtain a special permit in accordance with Section 
VI-1D (Non-Conforming Uses) of the Wilmington Zoning 
By-Law to authorize the extension of a non-conforming 
use and a building permit for the enlargement of an 
existing, non-conforming restaurant for property 
located at 193 Main Street. 



Case #94-80 
Yolanda Martiniello 



To acquire a variance from Section III-lA.9.f.4 (Resi- 
dential Accessory Uses) authorizing a beauty shop as 
a home occupation. 



Case #95-80 
Donald A. Albanese 



Case #96-80 

Ronald P. Rogers 

E. R. Blaisdell Slate 

Prod. Company 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
III-1.B1, to allow the alteration and conversion of a 
single family dwelling into a two-family dwelling 
(Mother- in-Law Apartment) . 



To acquire a special permit in compliance with Section 
III-IV-B-5, authorizing the manufacturing use cutting 
and storage of slate and stone, for property located 
at 874 Main Street. 



Case #97-80 
George L. Barboza 



Case #98-80 
Joseph Balestrieri 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of a 
garage within a required reserve front yard for 
property located at 27 Roosevelt Road. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the sub-division of land 
into two lots. 



Case #99-100 

Joanne L. Vilasi, Agent 



To amend the decision granted for a previous hearing 
held on Sept. 23, 1977 to comply with the Conservation 
Commissions recommendation that the road not exceed 
twenty-five feet in length, for property located on 
Fairview Avenue. 



Case #100-80 

Louis P. Marsilia, Pres. 

United Tool & Die Co., Inc. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the construction of an 
addition within a required reserve side yard. 



58 



n plicant 



warles E. Samatis 



se //102-80 



se #101-80 



lph E. Newhouse 



ficlal Map Cases 



se #S-l-80 



arles M. Steeves 



se flS-2-80 
onard Sutera 



se #S-3-80 
ristine Benson 



se #S-4-80 

am S. Kozlowskl 



se //S-5-8 

ul K. Butt, Agent 



se //S-6-80 

ester H. Hall, III 

inbow Realty Trust 



Reason for Appeal 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) authorizing the installation of a 
swimming pool within a required reserve rear yard. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow an existing dwelling to re- 
main within a required reserve front yard for 
property located on Brand Avenue. 



To construct a single family dwelling on land owned by 
Barbara A. Connolly, 3 Edwards Rd., Wilmington, Ma. 
as shown on Assessors Map 8, Lot 21-SRB and not 
shown on the Official Map G.L. ch. 41.S.81.E, on a 
way known as Baldwin Road. 



To construct two single family dwellings on land 
owned by Pleasant Realty Trust (Assessors Map 11- 
Parcel 38) and not shown on the Official Map (G.L. 
ch.41. S81E) on a way known as Fourth Avenue. 



To construct a single family dwelling on land owned 
by Norman and Christine Benson, 1461 Pawtucket Blvd. 
Lowell, Ma. as shown on Assessors Map 54, Lot 63 
and not shown on the Official Map G.L. ch.41.S.81.E, 
on a way known as Crescent Street. 



To construct a single family dwelling on land owned 
by Adam S. Kozlowski, 80A Salem St., Wilmington, MA. 
as shown on Assessors Map 32, Lots 71, 72 and 73 and 
not shown on the Official Map G.L. ch.41.S.81.E, on 
a way known as Newland Avenue. 



To construct a single family dwelling on land owned 
by Paul K. & William F. Butt, 3 Kilmarnock Street, 
Wilmington, Ma, as shown on Assessors Map 44, Lot 90 
and not shown on the Official Map G.L.ch. 41.S.81.E, 
on a way known as Magazine Avenue. 



To construct a single family dwelling on land owned 
by Chester H. Hall, III Trustee of Rainbow Realty 
Trust as shown on Assessors Map 67, Lot 75A and 
75B and not shown on the Official Map G.L. ch.41. 
S.81.E, on a way known as Lee Street. 



Decision 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



■se #S-7-80 
len J. Salines 



To construct a single family dwelling on land owned 
by Allen J. Salines, 26 Susan Drive, Saugus, Ma., as 
shown on Assessors Map 40, Lot 81-SRA and not shown 
on the Official Map G.L. ch. 41 . S . 81 . E . , on a way 
known as Fairmont Avenue 



Granted 



59 



Applicant 

Case //S-8-80 
Francis Raposa 



Case //S-9-80 
Kenneth A. Roberts 



Case //S-10-80 
Ralph E. Newhouse 



Case //S-ll-80 
Ralph E. Newhouse 



Case //S-12-80 
Ralph E. Newhouse 



Reason for Appeal 



To construct a single family dwelling on land owned 
by Francis Raposa, 30 Florence Ave., Tewksbury, MA., 
as not shown on the Official Map G.L. ch. 41.S.81.E, 
on a way known as Commonwealth Avenue. 



To construct a single family dwelling on land owned 
by Kenneth A. Roberts, 10 Lee Street, Wilmington, Ma., 
as shown on the Assessors Map 67, Lot 25 and not 
shown on the Official Map G.L. ch. 41.S.81.E, on a 
way known as Lee Street. 



To construct a single family dwelling on land owned by 
Ralph E. Newhouse, (shown on Assessors Map 44, Parcels 
63 & 65) and not shown on the Official Map G.L. ch. 
41.S.81.E, on a way known as Brand Avenue. 



To construct a single family dwelling on land owned 
by Ralph E. Newhouse, Bldr. & Construction Inc., 
37 Lowell Street as shown on Assessors Map 44, Parcel 
65/4 and not shown on the Official Map G.L. ch. 41. S. 
81. E., on a way known as Brand Avenue. 



To construct a single family dwelling on land owned 
by Ralph E. Newhouse, Bldr. & Contr., Inc. 37 Lowell 
Street, Wilmington as shown on Assessors Map 44, 
Lot 65/5 and not shown on the Official Map G.L. ch. 
41.S.81.E, on a way known as Brand Avenue. 



Decisi 



Grante< 



Grantei 



Withdr£ 



Grantee! 




Capt. Larz Neilson - 25th Anniversary of TOWN CRIER 
60 




Jtsmi 



Conservation Commission 



ch a drought predicted in New England during the next decade, the necessity of conserving and protecting our 
ter resources is receiving increased attention. Wetland values, which the Conservation Commission is re- 
Lred to protect, are closely related to water quality and quantity. Development, which could decrease the 
tlands or impair their functioning, and improper hazardous waste disposal, which could reach our water 
jply are two activities of great interest to the Commission. 

Lmington has seen such development during the past year, and in accordance with its legislated purposes, 
a Conservation Commission has held 24 Wetland Protection Act hearings, to control activity in and adjacent 
wetlands, in order to preserve the wetland values. Several of these hearings involved the industrial and 
nmercial building which is apparent in the town. These projects are often of greater scope and may create 
greater impact on the environment than single residential construction, therefore requiring much of the 
mnission's time to deal with their magnitude. Commission members made over 360 on-site inspections during 
e year, to determine the applicability of the Wetland Protection Act, and to check on the status of various 
ojects already under an Order. 

e Conservation Commission continues to value communication and cooperation with other town boards and 
ficials to realize mutual goals of maintaining and improving the quality of life for town residents. Members 

the Commission have attended numerous meetings with state and federal officials, and with surrounding com- 
nities, as well as those of local boards, when issues of importance to conservation concerns might arise, 
e Commission has been working closely with the Department of Environmental Quality Engineering (DEQE) on a 
riety of problems, especially when this state agency can provide some additional expertise for our local 
ncerns, or when they have requested the Commission's cooperation. 

entification of and elimination of illegal disposal of hazardous wastes is becoming more possible with 
creased public awareness, scientific knowledge, and legal requirements. The Commission has called to the 
tention of the local Hazardous Waste Co-ordinator , Ernest Romano, various sites with potential hazardous 
ste problems, which have been discovered in town as a result of the Commission's concern with water quality 
d wetland protection. 

line with wanting to educate and encourage young people towards an increased awareness of the importance 
ecology and conservation, this year's Arbor Day Program, found newly-elected Vice Chairman Paul Rose 

siting all of the fifth grades in town, presenting each class member with a seedling to be planted at home. 

ul discussed conservation in general and discussed and passed out literature on how to plant and care for 

e seedlings. 

other function of the Conservation Commission is to administer certain town-owned lands for conservation 
d open space purposes. Such land is usually unbuildable wetland, valuable for its wetland and open space 
lues and for preserving and protecting watershed areas. In previous years the town has purchased some such 
nd, utilizing state and federal self-help funds. Individuals may also donate land to the town, specifying 
s use for conservation and thus be assured that the land will remain in its natural condition, while re- 
iving certain tax benefits as a result of the gift. This year the town was pleased to accept approximately 
acres off Adams Street from Larry Doo. In December, the town meeting voted a small section of land adjacent 
Cook Avenue to be designated for conservation. This action was initiated by area residents and will provide 
small buffer between residential and industrial uses. 

e Commission is gratified that the town now has a shed in which to store its road salt and prevent this from 
aching into the wetlands. Securing of available state funds for this project can be credited to the help 
d assistance from Rep. James Miceli and Senator Robert Buell. 

sidents of Federal Street who have experienced extreme flooding conditions were supported by the Conservation 
mmission in their efforts to have culverting under Federal and Woburn Streets revised, to accommodate the 
creased run-off coming downstream during storm conditions. 

e Commission welcomed Larry Labrie as a newly-appointed member, filling a longstanding vacancy. Larrv bad 
de valuable contributions to the Commission as an associate member, prior to his appointment. 

e Commission encourages and welcomes the continued support and interest of all town residents. 



61 



Carter Lecture Fund 



Mr. Kenneth Wilson arranged "AN EVENING OF MUSIC FROM .ERIN" to be presented with the Reverend Francis V. 
Strahan and him on March 16, 1979. Due to illness, Mr. Wilson could not be with us. As many were disappoinid 
the committee voted to invite Father Strahan again and this time with Mr. Wilson, on May 2, 1980, the progra | 

and Sing-along were well received by an enthusiastic audience. 

CHINA after MAO - Dramatic changes for 1 billion people. The Carter Committee cordially invites you to the 
Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium in the High School at 8:15 in the evening, Wednesday, May 6, 1981. In his newr 
travel documentary film JENS BJERRE explores and explains the many drastic changes which have taken place ini j 
China since the death of Mao Tse Tung - changes which have deeply affected every individual with new freedom 
in education, science, art and economy. China is taking a new course - how will this affect the outside worl? 

Mr. Bjerre travelled thousands of miles from North to South and from East to West to produce this penetratini 
documentary on all aspects of life in China today under the new leadership. 

CHINA after MAO goes beyond surface impressions and depicts the very fabric of life with an authentic look a| 
the Chinese people at home, at work and at leisure. You will sail with a fisherman family on their junk dow> 
the picturesque Likiang River through a breathtaking scenery marked by majestic hills and caves and visit 
small communities along the riverbanks through Kwangsi Autonome Province - an area which until recently was ! 
closed to foreigners. 

I 

Here is the latest from China; A realistic, objective and un-censored report - and also an extraordinary 
beautiful travelogue. 

The Carter Programs, are presented free to the residents of Wilmington. We hope you will be with us on May 6\ i 
1981. 

At our meeting on January 28, 1981, the election of officers was held. Mrs. Joseph J. Slater, who has been 
chairman since 1967, nominated Mrs. Herbert L. Fielding to be chairman; seconded by Miss Frankline Allen - i| 
was so voted and we welcome Mrs. Fielding as our new chairman. Mrs. Fielding nominated Miss Allen to be 
Secretary; seconded by Mrs. Slater - it was so voted and we welcomed Miss Allen as our new Secretary. The 
other members of the committee are Mrs. Edward M. Neilson and Mr. Kenneth Wilson. 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 



The following is a list of all 
tested, sealed, not sealed, and 


weighing and measuring 
condemned during the 


devices, scales, pumps, 
year 1980. 


meters, 


and weights that 




Sealed 


Not Sealed 


Adjusted 


Condemmed 


Balances, Scales, Weights 


200 


30 


94 


20 


Liquid Measuring Meters 


190 


12 


60 


28 


Capacity Measures 


40 


12 


24 


26 


Other Measuring Devices 


58 


21 


40 


26 


epackaged Foods Reweighed 


6,000 









62 



Council on Aging 



The year 1980 was a very busy one for the Council on Aging. As the senior population increased, so did the 
leed for services to the elderly. 

'To obtain these services the elderly person turns to the Council on Aging. Services and programs oriented to 
issist the elderly person to function independently in their own homes, are offered to the elderly person 
:hrough the Council on Aging. Many thousands of dollars have been saved for the taxpayers this year. Through 
lany of the programs, we were able to keep a number of our seniors out of doctors offices, hospitals and nurs- 
ing homes, money which would have been paid out of Medicare payments. 

ifhe elderly citizen is able to seek help with the many problems facing them through the coordinator at the 
)rop-In-Center . The Center has been generously donated to the seniors through Mike Demoulas of Demoulas Super- 
aarkets. In the course of a month over 1600 persons utilize the Center and between 400-500 calls are made to 
Che Center a month seeking help, counseling or socialization when lonely. 

The Council on Aging operates a Mini-Bus service for the seniors. The Mini Bus' prime function is to transport 
:he elderly who live alone, handicapped and without transportation of their own, to doctors, hospitals and 
Jther elderly related travel. Approximately 600 persons a month utilize this service. The bus is operated by 
:wo part-time drivers, paid by the Council on Aging budget, James Shine and Forster Balser. This year the 
Council on Aging was able to purchase a much needed new bus through the very generous $5,000.00 donation from 
:he Rotary Club and the balance from the Town of Wilmington taxpayers. 

Che year 1980 saw an increase in participation in the Hot-Lunch Program. This we feel was due largely to the 
jpiral inflationary cost of food. 600-700 meals were delivered to Shut-ins and 400-500 meals were served at 
:he North Intermediate lunch site a month. 

Che Council on Aging was able to obtain $78,000.00 in 1980 for the elderly citizens of Wilmington, through 
>articipation in the Fuel Assistance Program and $34,000.00 in weatherization material and labor through the 
[involvement in the Winterization Program. 

Thousands of dollars in homemaking, transportation, day care, legal services, psychiatric treatment and 
)hysical therapy were obtained for the elderly through referrals by the coordinator. 

Che new Court Juvenile Program operated between the coordinator and the probation officer at the Woburn District 
tourt was very helpful this year, approximately 20 older seniors were able to receive help with a variety of 
)dd jobs in their homes. 

'his year we were able to help many of our seniors supplement their incomes, by obtaining employment for them 
Ln several businesses in the Town. 

ill of the scheduled programs at the Drop-In-Center, which include activities designed to either provide 
jocial contact, health, exercise or entertainment for the elderly, such as, swimming, bowling, arts and crafts, 
lance lessons, whist parties and the diabetic and blood pressure clinics were well attended. 

?he year saw an increase in all our social programs. Many of our seniors were hospitalized, increasing parti- 
:ipation in our Friendly Visitors, Dial-a-Friend, Sunshine Ladies, Vial of Life, Senior Postal Alert Network 
'rogram and Personal Counseling. 

i monthly social was selected and organization by the Council and the Coordinator for the seniors this year. 

Several businesses, clubs, and organizations were very generous to the seniors in the year 1980 for which the 
leniors extended their thanks: Demoulas Supermarkets, Tewksbury-Wilmington Elks, Sweetheart Plastics, Diamond 
Irystal Salt, Rotary Club, Kiwanis Club, Knights of Columbus, Charles River Breeding, Yum Yum Shop, Instrumental 
.aboratories, Table Talk Pies, American Legion Post 136 and Saint Dorothy's Parish. 



63 



School Committee 



The School Committee of the Town of Wilmington herewith presents its report for the year 1980. The present 
membership of the committee is as follows: 

Lester E. White, Chairperson 

Philip A. Fenton, Sr., Vice Chairperson 

Linda T. McMeniraen, Secretary 

John D. Brooks 

James A. Demos 

James D. Tighe 

Wilmington opened its school classes this year on September 3, 1980, with a total enrollment of A, 072 student: 
This figure is down 272 from last year's official enrollment of 4,344. 

ACCREDITATION 

A committee representing the New England Association of Schools and Colleges and composed of twenty-nine 
educators from Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire visited Wilmington High School for three days 
in October, 1980. As part of a reaccreditation process which takes place at least once every ten years, the 
visiting team reviewed a self study completed by the staff, observed classes, and attended meetings with 
administrators and members of the high school faculty. In the Spring of 1981 after the New England Assoc iatl> 
of Schools and Colleges, Commission on Public Schools meets to review the findings of the visiting team, a 
final report relative to the reaccreditation of Wilmington High School will be forwarded to school officials. 

STAFF RECRUITMENT 

As in the six previous years, the number of qualified teachers applying for jobs greatly exceeded the limited 
number of positions available. The school administration received numberous inquiries and applications from 
certified teaching personnel. A significant number of these inquiries was received from out of state 
universities. 

ASSISTANT SUPERINTEND ENCY VACANCY FILLED 

Following an extensive search involving 153 applicants, the School Committee named Dr. Carol Sager to the 
position of Assistant Superintendent of Schools, thus filling the vacancy created when former Assistant 
Superintendent, Derek Little, resigned in the Spring. 

In the past eight years Dr. Sager has directed Wilmington's Reading programs K-12 as well as the Title I Pro- 
gram which has been certified as exemplary by the Massachusetts State Department of Education. 

A graduate of Barnard College, Dr. Sager received her doctorate from Boston University, School of Education. 
Her experiences range from teaching at all levels, nursery school, elementary school, high school, college 
and adult education; to serving as a consultant for educational and curriculum matters to textbook publishers 
and various agencies throughout this country and in Europe. Currently Dr. Sager is on the advisory board of 
national organizations for curriculum evaluation and review. 

BUSINESS MANAGER APPOINTED 

The School Committee appointed Mr. Gerald E. Missal to the position of Business Manager for the Wilmington 
Public Schools. Mr. Missal was selected from over thirty original applications for this position which 
opened as a result of the retirement of the former Business Manager, Mr. Anthony DeLuca. Prior to this assigi 
ment Mr. Missal was an Administrative Assistant to the Business Manager of the Arlington, Massachusetts Publi' 
Schools. He has taught six years at the secondary school level. Mr. Missal received a B.A. degree from 
Wilkes College in Pennsylvania and an Ed.M. from Harvard University, School of Education where he is currentl; 
enrolled in a doctoral program. 



64 



ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS 



Scholastic achievement at Wilmington High School continues to be rewarded in a variety of ways. This year 
;ertif icates were granted to 110 students who were on the Honor Roll for the entire school year. Students who 
l*ere on the Honor Roll for two years, thirty-four in number, received a varsity letter embossed with a lamp 
symbolizing learning while each of the thirteen students who were on the Honor Roll for three years were 
awarded a sweater featuring a scholastic lamp and the words "Wilmington High School" embroidered on it. 

Ln the Spring of 1980, 29 students were inducted into the National Honor Society. Including the 20 seniors 
»ho had been installed in their Junior year, 49 students are members of the National Honor Society. 

ligh School Seniors are also recognized for their effort, cooperation, scholarship and/or outstanding per- 
formance in a particular area on a monthly basis. Each month the faculty is asked to submit the names of 
students they feel should obtain this recognition. Two Student of the Month are selected. 



The Task Force established by the Wilmington School Committee to examine the quantity and quality of facilities 
available for educational programs at Wilmington High School will report its findings to the School Committee 
aarly in 1981. During the year the Task Force, composed of teachers, students, school committee members, and 
(administrators held several on-site visits to evaluate existing space utilization as well as to determine 
purrent space needs. 



"laintaining good discipline at the High School continues to be of primary concern to parents, students, school 
:ommittee members, and high school staff. With support from the School Committee and parents, several changes 
lave taken place which range from stricter enforcement of school rules to the creation of new rules, such as 
the elimination of student parking. Additionally, the High School Administration is currently exploring a 
variety of possible alternatives for students who repeatedly have difficulty following the rules and regula- 
tions of the building. 



The School Committee, in accordance with guidelines set forth by the U.S. Office of Education and on the 
recommendation of the School Administration, continues its commitment to the education of Wilmington's gifted 
and talented youth. As Project Enterprise , the title of Wilmington's program for gifted and talented young- 
sters, enters its second year of operation with two full-time teachers, several important changes have taken 
place. Having expanded to include eligible students in Grade 8, the program now services approximately 100 
youngsters, Grades 4-8. This year for the first time, through busing and scheduling changes, Project 
Enterprise students have the opportunity to work In a group setting with their peers. In Grades 4-6 gifted 
children are bused to the two larger elementary schools twice a week. While at the intermediate schools 
Schedules are arranged to that students can meet for a double period once a week. Emphasis is placed on 
:reative problem solving, decision making, leadership skills, and career awareness. 

jtn January, 1981, youngsters in Grades 7 & 8 will become involved in a mentorship program. This will enable 
■students to explore possible careers by matching them up with professionals in fields related to their ex- 
pressed interests. 

knottier welcome addition to the program has been the formation of a systemwide Parents Advisory Council 
which meets monthly. Their valuable suggestions and cooperative efforts have contributed significantly to 
[the success of this program. 



Requests for leaves of absence, resignations and retirements were granted to 38 teachers for the following 
reasons : 

Leaves of Absence: 18 



FACILITIES 



DISCIPLINE 



GIFTED & TALENTED PROGRAM 



RESIGNATIONS & RETIREMENTS 



Sabbatical leave 
Maternity leave 
Graduate study 
Alternative occupation 



1 
11 

3 

3 



65 



Resignations : 20 



Retirement 2 Career change 2 

Teach in other communities 3 Reduction in force 4 

Family responsibility 3 Teachers on leave 6 

In addition, one teacher was dismissed in accordance with the provisions set forth in Ch. 71, Sect. 42 of the 
General Laws of Education Relating to School Committees . 

Retirements 

The School Committee wishes to recognize the retirement of Mr. Anthony J. DeLuca who served our community witt ' 
distinction for thirty years. Mr. DeLuca was appointed Business Manager in September, 1975. Prior to this, 
Mr. DeLuca held the positions of Administrator of Work-Study Program, Intermediate Principal, Elementary 
Supervising Principal, and high school teacher. His diligent efforts on behalf of the Wilmington Public 
Schools throughout the years are gratefully acknowledged by this Committee. 

Mrs. Mary P. Mogan also retired after thirty years of service as a teacher of Mathematics. Mrs. Mogan's 
concern for students and for quality education has been greatly appreciated by all who have worked with her. 
The Committee wishes to extend its sincere appreciation to Mrs. Mogan for her dedicated service to the youth 
of Wilmington. 

The Wilmington Public Schools were in operation 180 days beginning September 5, 1979 and ending June 18, 1980. 
The Committee held 24 regular meetings, 2 special meetings, 4 collective bargaining meetings, plus numerous 
sub-committee meetings regarding collective bargaining, 8 dismissal hearings in accordance with Chapter 71, II 
Section 42 of the General Laws of Education , 1 combined meeting relative to grievances and Directors' collecti I 
bargaining, 3 budget meetings including 1 joint meeting with the Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen, for 
a total of 42 meetings for the year 1980. 

The Committee is grateful to the Town Officials, other Town Departments, and to the citizens of Wilmington for 
their excellent cooperation and assistance during the past year. 




66 



Superintendent of Schools 



I am pleased to submit the Annual Report of the activities of the Wilmington Public Schools for the year 1980. 
A review of the year's activities brings out the following highlights: 

BASIC SKILLS 

One of the major tasks before us this year has been the implementation of the Basic Skills Improvement Policy 
that has been mandated by the Massachusetts Department of Education. We, like all school systems in the 
Commonwealth, must measure and evaluate the competency of our students in the academic areas of mathematics, 
reading, and writing beginning in the 1980-1981 school year. During the following academic years other basic 
skills (listening and speaking) are to be measured. 

The purpose of this program is to assist all students to achieve competency in basic skills prior to high 
school graduation through the provision of appropriate curriculum, instruction, and evaluation. 

In the spring of 1981 according to Wilmington's Basic Skills Improvement Program, which has been developed 
with on-going input from a committee consisting of parents, teachers, students, administrators and employers, 
youngsters in grades 3, 6, and 8 will be tested. Skills in reading, writing, and mathematics which students 
will be expected to achieve at these grade levels have been outlined as well as the performance levels stu- 
'dents must attain to show mastery of these skills at the grade levels specified. 

The results of these tests will be reviewed with parents and students so that they will be informed of 
strengths and weaknesses in basic skills competency. For students who are determined to be in need of help 
with basic skills, follow up instructional services will be provided. In addition, formal reports indicating 
what Wilmington has accomplished through its Basic Skill Improvement Program will be shared with the public. 

TESTING COMMISSION ESTABLISHED 



In order to monitor individual progress and determine program effectiveness educational tests are administered 
to students on a regular basis. In the past few years mandated programs such as Special Education, Title I, 
and Basic Skills have significantly increased the number of tests that school systems are required to give. 

For this reason a Testing Commission, consisting of parents, teachers, school psychologists, administrators, 
and students, was established to examine systemwide testing needs and to review the existing program in light 
of these needs. 

Resulting from this investigation will be a recommended testing schedule which, in addition to reflecting the 
ideas of the entire school community and complying with the regulations of state mandated programs, will avoid 
duplication of efforts as well as decrease the costs involved in testing. 

WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Guidance Counseling 

The Guidance Department continues to offer a broad variety of counseling services designed to help students 
and parents. Among the programs offered are the following: 

A ninth grade Group Guidance course that meets weekly for 
one semester, two evening programs on Financial Aid , and two 
evening programs related to College Selection and Admission . 

I Additionally the Guidance Department arranges for representatives from various colleges to visit the high school 
and be available to answer students' questions. 



67 



Vocational Guidance is taking on a new dimension as more students are using the Career Center with the en- 
couragement of their Guidance Counselors. By using a computer terminal, students are able to explore a 
variety of career options, types of training needed, educational institutions providing specific training 
programs, as well as information related to the procurement of financial aid. 

Advanced Placement Program 

For the third year Wilmington High School continues to offer students the opportunity to take college level 
courses at the high school. Upon completion of these courses students may take an examination offered by the 
College Entrance Examination Board which, if passed, qualifies the student to receive college credit. For 
qualified students this program could result in significant savings in terms of both time and money. 

Foreign Language 

The High School Annex, formerly called the Swain School, has been transformed into the Foreign Language wing 
of the Wilmington High School. Throughout the building one can hear students and teachers speaking in either 
French, German, Italian, or Spanish. In addition to studying one <or more of the above-mentioned languages, 
students have the opportunity to study Latin which was re- introduced at the High School in 1979. 

Approximately 50% of the student body study a foreign language at Wilmington High School. Notable among the 
accomplishments of these students and their teachers this year are the facts that the Spanish Honor Society 
awarded three scholorships to top students in Spanish V, 99% of last year's Spanish II honor students are now 
taking Spanish III Honors, and French III Honors is now taught entirely in French from the very first day of 
the course. 

ART 

Artist In Residence At High School 

The Massachusetts Artists' Foundation awarded a grant to the Wilmington Art Department to participate in an 
Artist-In-Residence Program. The resident artist, painter Scott Prior, spent three months at Wilmington High 
School. His residency included instructing students in the technical aspects of his work as well as presenting 
exhibits. 

Photography Students Win Awards 

Our high school photography students distinguished themselves competitively by receiving three of the awards 
given by the Wilmington Town Crier in the contest the paper sponsored to commemorate the town's 250th 
anniversary. 

CAREER AND OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION 
Project S.C.O .R.S. - Shawsheen Collaborative Occupational Regional Experience 

Project SCORE, a collaborative program to provide vocational skill training for special needs students in 
five towns, h?s been federally funded for the second consecutive year. As part of its contribution to the 
regional effort Wilmington offers courses in carpentry and secretarial skills at the High School five days a 
week from 2:30 to 5:00 p.m. 

Funds Procured For Microcomputers 

Through a federal grant monies were obtained to purchase microcomputers for High School business education 
programs. In view of the impact of computers on the business and industrial communities, this is a most 
welcome addition to current course offerings. 

Job Placement Increased 

The job placement section of the Career and Occupational Education Department has been able to increase its 
placement of students in the working world, both in part-time, and full-time positions. We have gone from 
eighty-five placements last year to three hundred and ten this year. The jobs range from unskilled laborers 
to trained technicians. 



6 8 



ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 
Writing Instruction Emphasized at Wilmington High School 

Students are continuing to elect courses in writing which include Basic Composition, Developmental Writing, 
Writing Workshop, Grammar and Usage (three levels), Journalism, Logic and Semantics and Language Study. The 
curriculum of the other electives, Communications Skills I and Communications Skills II includes weekly 
writing assignments or a research paper project. 

Elementary School Spelling Program Successful 

Emphasis on spelling continues at the elementary level. Gains in achievement were significant following the 
implementation of our new spelling program. This program Improves the student's spelling ability and is a 
means for developing written communication. 

Teachers Attend Basic Skills Workshops 

•During the past year elementary teachers and secondary English teachers have been involved in workshops con- 
cerning the Basic Skills Improvement Program. Listening skills objectives, writing samples, and testing pro- 
cedures have been developed. 

Wilmington's Title I Program Validated As Exemplary By The Massachusetts Department of Education 

The Wiln.ington Title I Program was one of three in the state adjudged exemplary by the Massachusetts State 
Department of Education. This is a considerable achievement in light of the numberous criteria a Title I 
validated program must meet. In the spring of 1980 the State Department sent a team of highly-trained program 
evaluators to Wilmington to conduct an extensive on-site visit. Using lengthy monitoring instruments, the 
on-site team noted several outstanding features of the program, in addition to the fact that the average 
achievement of the children in the Wilmington Title I Program was consistently greater than that of other 
children in similar programs across the nation. Additionally these findings were reviewed by several experts 
at the State Title I Office. As a result of this review Wilmington's Title I Director was invited to make a 
presentation at the annual Title I Conference in Hyannis to describe Wilmington's program and outline the 
components that contribute to its success. 

Reading Department Receives Federal Funds For Microcomputers 

Through the procurement of federal funding the Reading Department was able to purchase three microcomputers 
for the High School Reading Center. Besides providing high- impact individualized instruction for students, 
the microcomputers provide the Reading teachers with a management system which allows them to evaluate and 
monitor the progress of significantly more students. 

Commonwealth Inservice Institute Grant Approved 

The Reading Department was awarded funding through the Massachusetts Department of Education for a project 
designed to help seventh and eighth grade teachers to develop the strategies needed to integrate basic skill 
instruction into their content areas. Training consisted of after-school workshops as well as in-class 
visitations which included demonstration as well as evaluation of teaching techniques. As a result of this 
training, teachers will be better able to assess student basic skill needs and individualize instruction 
based on these needs. 

MATHEMATICS 

This year modifications in the grade six program have been made which enable teachers to deal more effectively 
with various ability levels. Especially successful has been the use of diversified materials to establish a 
more challenging curriculum for students of high ability in math. 

Math Review Sections At Intermediate Schools 

In anticipation of the state-mandated Basic Skills Improvement Program, math review sections have been operating 
at each intermediate school. An individualized approach designed to meet the specific needs of students has 
been producing exceptionally good results. 



69 



Calculus Introduced at the High School 



At the high school this year a new semester course, Introduction to Calculus, is being offered. Students who 
plan to enter college as math, science, or engineering majors should find this to be a valuable addition to 
the curriculum. 

Math Honor Society Formed 

A Math Honor Society has recently been established at the high school. As well as participating in a variety 
of math-oriented activities, students in the Math Honor Society also provide valuable services to their school 
Many members have been providing tutorial help for other students who are having difficulties in math. Other 
members are involved with teaching computer programming to gifted elementary students after the regular school 
day. Approximately fifty students are members of the Math Honor Society. 

MUSIC 

The Wildcat Marching Band spent five days at summer training camp on Bear Island in Meredith, New Hampshire 
to prepare for the fall marching season. Camp combined a great deal of discipline, hardwork and kinship. 
The trip was financed by the students, parents and instructors. 

The month of December was highlighted by the annual winter concert series. The Music Department produced 
eighteen concerts and short programs for this series. The Wildcat Brass Ensemble played on WBZ radio's Dave 
Maynard Show for the benefit of Children's Hospital. They presented checks donated by the Secondary School. 

SCIENCE/HEALTH EDUCATION 

Peer Leadership Grant Received 

The Science Department received a two-year grant from the Department of Public Health to institute a peer 
leadership program in grade seven. The goal of this program is to help students resist peer pressure to 
start smoking. 

Health Education Curriculum Completed 

The final phase of the Health Education Program was completed this year with its implementation in grades 
seven and eight. The major goal of this program is to help students live healthier, more productive lives 
by increasing their knowledge of the structure of the human body and prevention of disease. 

Astronomy Course At The High School 

Astronomy , a course instituted at the high school this year, has attracted much interest from the local 
community as well as students. Donations from four local companies were used to assist in the purchase of 
sophisticated telescopes needed for this course. 

SOCIAL STUDIES 

An elementary committee is working monthly in reviewing elementary social studies materials to be adopted 
systemwide. The new program will be adaptable to a wide spectrum of ability levels and will provide con- 
tinuity to the Social Studies curriculum. The content of the new program will be more traditional in its 
approach and will stress basic citizenship skills mandated by the State. 

At the high school, ten students have volunteered to participate in a government internship program sponsored 
and coordinated by Representative James Miceli's office. The program, due to start in January 1981, will 
involve students in the following areas: (1) Constituent Services, (2) Hearings, (3) State Agencies, (4) 
Human Services Committee. Students will participate on an independent study basis. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

During the 1979-1980 school year 187 students were referred for initial TEAM evaluation as provided for in 
Chapter 766. The following graph indicates, by grade level, the number of referrals received. 



70 



An ongoing goal of Chapter 766 is the mainstreaming of special needs students into regular education programs. 
The Special Education Department is continuing to work cooperatively with all schools and departments in an 
effort to achieve this goal. The following two graphs provide data with regard to (a) movement among program 
classifications, and (b) increases and decreases of special education service hours for special needs students 
during the 1979-1980 school year. 



GRAPH B 



MOVEMENT AMONG PROTOTYPES 
1979-1980 School Year 



> 
& 



3 
I 

O 

u 
a 

1 

z 



240 

200 
160 
120 
80 
40 



□ 



24 

Q 



Total Number of Reviews 



Number of Reviews Reduced by Prototype 



Number of Reviews Increased by Prototype 



Q I Number of Reviews Found Not Special Needs 



72 




o 

CM 
CM 

I 

I 

U 

c 

OJ 

•§ 

•u 
CO 

<4-l 

o 



to 



2 

o 
H 



»»•••»•». 









id 




0) 






o 






o 




o 




X. 




o 


H 


CO 


W 


o 


o 


00 


M 


On 




j-I 




1 


W 




CO 










1-1 



T3 73 

ll 



in • 
«-i cn 
i ^ 

so 32 




CM OS 
I U 

EC 



OJ 

* > 

0--H 
03 AJ 
W O 
0J T< 

SiJ 

03 

0) 0) 
OC w 

D 0) 

e o 
c 

u <r 
oj • 

0) CM 

ao 

CO u-l 

c c 



OJ 
03 

o 

03 



CM iH 
. iH 
CM OJ 
O S 

in 

03 
OJ «3 

3 • 

r-l >s 



m omomo inomomomomom 
oo oo n n ve * m m<t«jnr)NNHH 



C • 

03 
OJ 

1 I 
OJ 4J 

J- O 

60 U 

o o 

u u 



73 



The Special Education Department continued to take advantage of the federal government's special education lav 
P.L. 94-142, by obtaining federal grant monies in an ongoing effort to upgrade and supplement the level of 
services to special needs students. Our 1980-1981 grant totals $111,234. With this money, the School Depart- 
ment has hired 2 additional speech pathologists, a part-time communication assistant, 2 learning disabilities 
teachers (1 for the high school and 1 for the elementary level), as well as additional contracted services of 
2 licensed consulting psychologists and a school psychologist. With this additional staff, the Special 
Education Department has been able to reduce caseloads and is further able to provide more intensive ancillary 
services to special needs students. 

Wilmington's entitlement under P.L. 94-142 will decrease for the 1980-1981 school year. Estimated entitlements 
total approximately $96,000, and the Special Education Department has already written a federal grant proposal 
in an effort to obtain these monies. 

During this past year the systemwide special needs parent advisory council continued to work closely with the 
special education director and staff. 

STATUS OF THE CLASS OF 1980 



To four year non-state colleges and universities .... 59 (20.1%) 

To four year state colleges and universities 49 (16.7%) 

To two year non-state colleges 15 ( 5.1%) 

To two year state colleges 26 ( 8.9%) 

To nursing schools 7 ( 2.4%) 

To other post high school education 8 ( 2.7%) 

Total to further education 164 (55.9%) 

To working forces 108 (36.9%) 

To military service 9 ( 3.1%) 

To marriage and work 12 ( 4.1%) 

Total 293(100.0%) 



PROPOSITION 2 1/2 

In November, 1980, the citizens of Wilmington voted to enact Proposition 2 1/2 as did voters throughout the 
State at a 60/40 ratio. This new piece of legislation entitled Chapter 580 of the Acts of 1980 went into 
effect on December 4, 1980. 

The Wilmington Public School administrators and School Committee will be working in cooperation with the Board 
of Selectmen, Town Manager, and Finance Committee in order to comply with this new legislation. 

Sufficient public meetings will be conducted in order that the general public might be apprised of all rami- 
fications of Chapter 580. It is our hope that the final impact of this new law will be cushioned by action 
of the legislature as they seek various methods of increasing local aid to cities and towns. 

In conclusion, I would like to take this opportunity to extend my appreciation to the School Committee, 
administrators, teachers, parents, and students who contributed their efforts to the Wilmington Public Schools 
during the 1980 school year. A special note of thanks to the many town departments that cooperated with the 
school system during 1980. 



74 



Shawsheen Regional Vocational/Technical 

School Committee 



Elected representatives of the School Committee are: 



BEDFORD 



BURLINGTON 
John G. Murphy 
John P. Miller 



Anthony Mazzone 

Joseph Rogers, Chairman 



BILLERICA 

Kenneth L. Buffum, Secretary-Treasurer 
Paul Heffernan 



TEWKSBURY 

Richard E. Griffin 
Wilson E. Brazile 



WILMINGTON 

Lawrence Flaherty, Vice Chairman 
Frank McLean 

My first report to the towns was in 1964 when I was a member of the Regional Vocational Technical Planning 
Committee. It was the opinion then that this school would perform a vital function to society and that 
opinion still prevails. In 1965 the Shawsheen Regional School became a reality and to the present day its 
history spells success. 

Regular meetings of the Regional School Committee were held the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month. 
Numerous additional special meetings were called by the Chairman as the need arose during the year. The time 
and place of all meetings are duly posted by the District Town Clerks at least forty-eight hours in advance. 
Unless otherwise noted, the meetings are held at the school facility located at 100 Cook Street, Billerica. 
These meetings are open to the public, and residents of the District are welcome to attend. 

The Area Coordinator Program is in its third year of operation at the local high schools. Programs such as 
Electronics Assembly, Power Stitching, Remedial Math Adult Training Program and Word Processing have become 
a part of the regular curriculum in the towns. 

The Student Advisory Committee meets with the School Committee several times a year to discuss and solve 
Jstudent problems within the school. 

1980 brought the formation of the General Advisory Committee whose duty is to explore the needs of the com- 
munity, new facilities anticipating locating in the region, and to offer suggestions on how these may affect 
the program. 

Our students have formed an active branch of the Vocational Industrial Clubs of America. In nationwide 
competition, Frank DeVita, Machine Shop, earned a bronze medal. The contest was held in Atlanta, Georgia. 

Jody Ochab of Health Services received a certificate of merit for volunteer services from the Bedford 
Veterans' Administration and also from the Mass. Eye and Ear Clinic. Last but not least, Jody has received 
recognition for State High School records in swimming. 

The past year has also seen the expansion of the Business Technology Program to include Word Processing to 
meet the demands of business. 

The Committee agreed to the installation of an Energy Conservation System, with the intention of realizing 
a savings in operating cost. 

Of Proposition 2 1/2: Sixty percent of the voters, including some of our own, obviously feel that property 
taxes in this state are too high, and that there has to be a solution that will provide relief. But those on 
the losing side of the Propostion 2 1/2 issue should not insult the integrity and intelligence of those on the 
winning side by taking a "let them live with it and suffer" attitude. By making Proposition 2 1/2 work, we 
can all be winners. The Committee's intentions are to maintain the day school program in its entirety and all 
other programs are to be self-supporting or eliminated. 



75 



Shawsheen Regional Vocational/Technical 
School Superintendent/Director 



It is with a great deal of satisfaction that we hear reports from industry on the high quality of students 
that graduate from this school. We are never satisfied with the level of our programs and are continually 
endeavoring to upgrade these. Twice a year we have Craft Advisory meetings where individuals who are working | 
in the respective trades meet with our instructors to review the courses of study and equipment and make 
recommendations for upgrading the program. As a result, we have perhaps one of the most modern and up-to-dat i 
vocational shop programs in the state. These constant evaluations correspond to the five-year accreditations! 
that most academic high schools comply with; however, in our case because of the rapid changes in industry, 
we cannot wait for an evaluation on a five-year basis. In addition, we have instituted the General Advisory 
Committee for the purpose of having a cross-section of individuals from the five towns who can serve in an 
advisory capacity to help determine the general direction that Shawsheen Tech should take. In accordance 
with the state requirements, wer are in the process of testing all of our students to make certain they have 
acquired the basic skills that are necessary to go out into business and industry. 

We like to consider ourselves as a "full-service" vocational school. Because of the cost of equipment, it is 
logical that we endeavor to use our facilities as much as possible. In line with this, besides our regular 
day school program, we have training in the afternoon from 2:30 - 5:00, four nights a week for about 800 
adults and during a six-week period in the summer for about 1200 students. With the advent of Proposition 
2 1/2 we are attempting to maintain our basic high school program but realize that in order to cut our budget 
we have to deny this type of supplementary education to some high school students as well as adults. 

A DMISSIONS September of 1980 has seen applications for the incoming ninth grade numbering 784 with only 400 
being admitted. The high cost of college education and the publicity of man-power needs in the high tech 
industry are among the contributing factors that have kept the demand for vocational-technical programs at a 
high level. Enrollment figures as of October 1, 1980 were as follows: 



TOWN 




9th 


10 th 


11th 


12th 


Total 


Bedford 




28 


34 


24 


21 


107 


Billerica 




136 


131 


139 


140 


546 


Burlington 




65 


57 


54 


52 


228 


Tewksbury 




100 


104 


106 


102 


412 


Wilmington 




72 


71 


66 


66 


275 


TOTALS 




401 


397 


389 


381 


1568 


The October 1st enrollment 
figures of 1551. 


figures 


show an increase 


of 17 students over 


the previous 


year ' s 


enrollment 


The following distribution 


reflects 


graduate choices 


in career pathing 


for the class 


of 1980 





Employment in the industrial sector 86% 



Further Education 7% 
Military 4% 
Other 2% 



76 



AFTERNOON SKILLS TRAINING PROGRAM In order to offer as many students as possible an opportunity to acquire 
a skill, we have continued the shop program each afternoon from 2:30-5:00 for some 300 students. These 
students receive a modified academic program at their local school and by attending Shawsheen Tech, act as a 
source of replacements for any day school students that leave the program. 

SUMMER PROGRAM The summer program was continued this year with an attendance of 845 students. 344 were 
students who wished to either explore or extend their skill training in the respective shops and the remaining 
501 students were here for make up. The opportunity for make up is offered to students of all five towns and 
this way it was not necessary for the five high schools to open their buildings for this program. 

ADULT EDUCATION Evening school commenced on September 29, 1980 with approximately 38 courses, serving ap- 
proximately 750 students. The programs operated weekly Monday through Thursday from 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. On 
November 30th an additional Saturday morning class in Word Processing was added to the Adult Education Program 
due to high demand by industry for personnel trained in this specific area. 

SPECIAL NEEDS In accordance with Chapter 766 we have enrolled some 2 30 students with special needs. We have 
been a pioneer in mainstreaming students in this category into the regular training program so that these 
students can acquire a skill and go out into the world of work qualified to get a job. Our services have in- 
cluded diagnostic screening, core evaluations and annual reviews in order to ensure that those students with 
special needs are assisted in every way possible. 

AREA COORDINATOR The Area Coordinator has been the catalyst in helping to develop skill training programs 
in the five towns in our region. At present, Mr. McDermott, the Area Coordinator, has helped install the 
Electronics Assembly Program as well as the Power Stitching Program. In addition, the Word Processing Pro- 
gram has been expanded. Many of our adults within the five towns, due to economic conditions, are seeking 
employment in local industry. Through our evening program called Project T.A.P. (Testing, Assessment and 
Placement) , we are providing career counseling, skill training and placement for adults who are single support 
of a household, underemployed or seek a career change. In addition, the Area Coordinator has been instru- 
mental in securing federal and state grants for special projects which have been helpful to the school. 

SCHOOL ACTIVITIES In May of this year Shawsheen Tech hosted the state competition for those students who 
are members of the Vocational Industrial Clubs of America. Over 600 persons were in attendance. Vocational 
schools from all over the state sent students who competed in 24 different skill areas. Shawsheen Tech 
students earned 9 gold medals for first place, 6 silver medals for second place and 4 bronze medals for third 
place. The annual parents' night was held on November 20 giving the parents the opportunity to discuss the 
performance of their children with the teachers. Open house was held on May 8. Many special activities in- 
cluding a water ballet and lifesaving techniques in the pool, the regional art festival in the gym and special 
demonstrations in the various shops were held. The school yearbook was based on the format used by Time 
Magazine with special permission, and was given an award by the New England Scholastic Association as the out- 
standing high school yearbook in the New England area. Pamela Boiko, a 12th grade student in Commercial Art 
from Burlington, was the top winner in the Boston Globe competition for art students and received a $1000 
scholarship. Outside activities by the students included working at Billerica High School, renovation of 
administration offices at the Center School in Burlington and the start in the fall of a solar energy house in 
Tewksbury. An advanced technology program was initiated especially for students showing high ability and who 
are interested in either becoming technicians or going on to further education. 

SCHOOL SPORTS Shawsheen Tech won top honors in hockey in the Commonwealth Athletic League playoffs. Jody 
Ochab, a senior in the Health Services Department, broke a national high school swim record in the 200 yard 
medley and was voted swimmer of the year by the Boston Globe. 

GRADUATION Since our seating capacity on the football field could not accommodate all those who were con- 
cerned about attending graduation exercises this year, the graduation was held at the Shriners' Auditorium in 
Wilmington. There were some 4000 people in attendance and the exercises were perhaps the best that were ever 
conducted by Shawsheen Tech. 

SUMMARY We have seen the completion of ten years of operation of our school. During this period of time 
thousands of graduates have completed their education at Shawsheen Tech and have gone out into the world of 
work. Their success has reflected the excellence not only of the facility but of the faculty, administration 
and a concerned School Committee that have all cooperated to make Shawsheen Tech into what is considered one 
of the finest vocational high schools in the state. We also realize that the strong support received the 
residents of the five towns have made it possible to maintain this high level of excellence and we fe^.i Lhat 
skilled training has been shown up to be a significant factor in the success of the community. One of the 
reasons that industry has remained in the area and expanded is because schools like Shawsheen have provided 



77 



them with their skilled needs. The training here at 
lives of the many people who have passed through and 
ing as many people as possible. 



Shawsheen Tech has developed the skills and enriched the 
we hope in the future to continue this success in help- 



Housing Authority 



ORGANIZATION 

The Wilmington Housing Authority is authorized by Section 3 of Chapter 121 B of the General Laws, as amended. 

MEMBERS Barbara H. Larson, Chairperson 

George W. Hooper, Vice Chairman 
Lorraine C. Brozyna, Secretary 
Kevin J. McMillan, Treasurer 
Melvin F. Keough, Assistant Treasurer 
Henry E. Borrazzo, Executive Director 

During 1980, Chairperson Barbara H. Larson with the efforts of Vice Chairman George W. Hooper, Secretary 
Lorraine C. Brozyna, Treasurer Kevin J. McMillan and Assistant Treasurer Melvin F. Keough, as well as the 
efforts of Executive Director Henry E. Borrazzo and Administrative Assistant Sandra H. Walsh, directed their 
attention to fulfilling the requirements for the development of the Federally funded 80 units of elderly 
housing and 25 units of low-income family housing. All requirements set forth by H.U.D. guidelines were met. 
Strong opposition developed against the project by area residents and required Town approval was not obtained, 
thus causing the time schedule not to be met. 

A program was initiated and bids were advertised for the replacement' of windows throughout Deming Way. A 
handicapped lift was installed in one of our 705 units. 

An on-going Modernization and Preventive Maintenance Program has been instituted, and during 1981, focus will 
be made on creative recreational programs and shut-in visitation will be studied. Focus will also be given to 
the creation of individual gardening units so that the tenants who are able and willing may grow their own 

vegetables. 

A study is underway for the conversion and updating of the heating system at Deming Way from oil to gas. This 

program should be completed in 1981. 




Fire Chief Arthur J. Boudreau Retires. 



78 



Housing Rehabilitation Program 



The Town of Wilmington has received a Federal Grant of $245,000 under the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development (HUD) Community Development Block Grant, Small Cities Program. The program is designed to address 
the needs of low and moderate income families. The target area for the Town of Wilmington's Neighborhood Re- 
vitalization Program is the Silver Lake area, west of Route 38. The specific bounds of the target area are as 
follows: 

South - Route 129 (Shawsheen Avenue) 

East - Route 38 (Main Street) 

North - Wilmington/Tewksbury Town Line 

Northwest - South Street from Boston & Maine Railroad 
tracks to Tewksbury line 

West - Boston & Maine Railroad Tracks 




79 



The housing rehabilitation program is designed to provide three kinds of grants, 100%, 75%, 50%, with a maxi- 
mum amount of $7,000. This maximum amount is based on a survey of houses in the Silver Lake target area. 
These houses were inspected inside and out for building/health code violations and energy efficiency. Some 
of the common problems included: faulty foundation under house and porches, lack of insulation in attic, wall 
crawlspace or floors, no storm windows and doors, lack of insulation around water pipes in crawlspaces, baseme 
flooding problems, leaks in roof, failing septic systems, debris in basement and around yard. 

Families who are of low and moderate income and are owner/occupant in the Silver Lake target area are eligible 
to apply for the grant. The maximum grant issued to any family will not exceed $7,000. The following chart 
indicates precisely how much financial assistance the Town will provide according to the degree of need within 

four catagories: 

APPLICANT 



If the applicant is: 

Elderly or handicapped and 
low income 



then the Town pays: 
100% 

of improvements up to 
a maximum of $7,000 



and the applicant pays: 

0% 



Elderly or handicapped and 
moderate income 



100% 

of improvements up to 
a maximum of $7,000 



0% 



Non-elderly and low income 



75% 

of improvements up to 
a maximum of $5,250 



25% 



Non-elderly and moderate income 



50% 

of improvements up to 
a maximum of $3,500 



50% 



Applications for homeowner were made available on a first come first served basis, starting August 12, 1980 at 
the Town Hall Annex. For further information please call 658-4897. 



Progress Report - August 12 to December 31, 1980: 

Total Applicants 62 
Applicants Verified 42 
Applicants Ineligible 20 



Allocation 



Expended 



Grants Written 
Grants Completed 



$35,833.00 



$5,242.00 




Another 250th event ■ Hospital Bed Race. 



80 



Accepted Streets 



STREET 


LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE 


(s) ACCEPTED 


Adams Street 


from Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 


2,915 


1908 




Adelaide Street 


from Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


666 


1976 




Agostino Drive 


from Gandalf Way 


999 


1979 




Aldrich Road 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


6,740 


1894 




Allen Park Drive 


from Fairmont Avenue to Fairmont Avenue 


2,319 


1971 




Andover Street 


from Salem Street 


180 


1894 




Andover Street 


from Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 


11,300 


1894 


1970 


Anthony Avenue 


from Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 


300 


1966 




Apollo Drive 


from Charlotte Road to Draper Drive 


300 


1971 




Arlene Avenue 


from Salem Street to Ella Avenue 


3,754 


1966 


1978 


Auburn Avenue 


from Shawsheen Avenue 


755 


1945 




Ayotte Street 


from Westdale Avenue to Crest Avenue 


240 


1947 




Baker Street 


from Brand Avenue to beyond Phillips Avenue 


684 


1945 




Baland Road 


from Ballardvale Street 


540 


1972 




Ballardvale Street 


from Salem Street to Route 125 


965 


1894 




Ballardvale Street 


from Route 125 to Andover Line 


12,000 


1894 




Bancroft Street 


from Liberty Street 


400 


1952 




Barbara Avenue 


from Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 


850 


1966 




Beacon Street 


from Church Street to Belmont Avenue 


970 


1915 




Beech Street 


from Burlington Avenue to Byron Street 


1,005 


1947 




Beeching Avenue 


from Cunningham Street to Faulkner Avenue 


440 


1959 




Belmont Avenue 


from Columbia Street to State Street 


980 


1933 




Benson Road 


from Radcliff Road to Tewksbury Line 


616 


1971 




Biggar Avenue 


from Salem Street to King Avenue 


1,282 


1975 




Birchwood Road 


from Shady Lane Drive 


1,197 


1952 




Birchwood Road 


from Judith Road 




iyj 3 




Boutwell Street 


from Bulington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


4,144 


1894 


1960 1971 


Brand Avenue 


from Bridge Lane 


510 


1933 


1943 


Brand Avenue 


from Baker Street to beyond Wisser Street 


950 


1933 


1943 


Brattle Street 


from Massachusetts Avenue to Garden Avenue 


1,066 


1945 




Brentwood Avenue 


from Woburn Street to Woodside Avenue 


1,017 


1938 




Bridge Lane 


from Shawsheen Avenue 


455 


1894 




Bridge Lane 


from Main Street to beyond Brand Avenue 


754 


1894 




Broad Street 


from King Street 


1,377 


1954 




Burlington Avenue 


from Main Street to Burlington Line 


8,588 


1894 




Burnap Street 


from Grove Avenue 


1,145 


1953 




Burnap Street 


from Winchell Road 


484 


1945 




Burt Road 


from Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 


1,653 


1945 


1946 


Butters Row 


from Main Street to Chestnut Street 


3,577 


1894 




Buzzell Drive 


from Draper Drive to Evans Drive 


600 


1971 




Canal Street 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 


1,505 


1939 


1955 


Carolyn Road 


from North Street to Marcia Road 


1,268 


1960 


1971 


Carson Avenue 


from Marie Drive to beyond Hathaway Road 


1,017 


1961 




Carter Lane 


from Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Norfolk Avenue 


1,411 


1957 




Catherine Avenue 


from Anthony Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1,000 


1966 




Cedar Street 


from Burt Road to Harris Street 


687 


1945 




Cedar Crest Road 


from Pinewood Road to Judith Road 


1,100 


1963 




Central Street 


from Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


552 


1950 




Chandler Road 


from Adams Street to Kelley Road 


400 


1957 





81 




STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE 


(s) ACCEPTED 


Chapman Avenue 


from 


Hathaway Road to Sheridan Road 


1,575 


1951 


1971 


Charlotte Road 


from 


Gunderson Road to beyond Apollo Drive 


859 


1971 




Chase Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


297 


1953 




Chestnut Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Woburn Line 


11,480 


1894 




Church Street 


from 


Main Street to Middlesex Avenue 


4,285 


1894 




Clark Street 


from 


Main Street to Church Street 


2,470 


1894 


1969 


Clorinda Road 


from 


Agostino Drive 


887 


1979 




Cochrane Road 


from 


Forest Street to Wabash Road 


800 


1947 




Columbia Street 


from 


Church Street to beyond Belmont Avenue 


1,150 


1908 


1933 


Concord Street 


from 


Federal Street to North Reading Line 


5,803 


1894 




Congress Street 


from 


Forest Street to Burlington Line 


977 


1939 




Cook Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


813 


1946 




Coolidge Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


OTA 

270 


1951 




Corey Avenue 


from 


Canal Street to Grand Street 


366 


1951 




Cottage Street 


from 


Main Street 


927 


1954 




Crest Avenue 


from 


Ayotte Street 


558 


1947 




Cross Street 


from 


Main Street to Lowell Street 


697 


1894 




Cunningham Street 


from 


Salem Street to Beeching Avenue 


2,447 


1944 


1953 1952 


Cypress Street 


from 


Glen Road 


260 


1951 




Dadant Drive 


from 


North Street to North Street 


1,760 


1964 




Davis Road 


from 


Main Street 


500 


1952 




Dayton Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


170 


1951 




Dell Drive 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


1,794 


1958 


1971 


Dexter Street 


from 


Main Street 


480 


1979 




Dobson Street 


from 


Glen Road to beyond Garden Avenue 


1,402 


1954 




Dorchester Street 


from 


Billerica Line 


1,214 


1951 




Dorothy Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 


1,490 


1960 




Draper Drive 


from 


Gunderson Road to Evans Drive 


1,560 


1959 


1971 


Drury Lane 


from 


Glen Road to School Street 


633 


1963 




Dublin Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


500 


1951 




Dunton Road 


from 


Nassau Avenue 


649 


1956 




Eames Street 


from 


Main Street to Woburn Street 


3,200 


1894 




Edward Road 


from 


Forest Street to beyond Baldwin Road 


450 


1947 




Ella Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1,043 


1978 




Elwood Road 


from 


Forest Street 


642 


1968 




Emerson Street 


from 


Faulkner Avenue to Oakwood Road 


590 


1951 




Englewood Drive 


from 


Kenwood Drive 


455 


1971 




Evans Drive 


from 


Gunderson Road to Draper Drive 


2,071 


1971 




Everett Avenue 


from 


Faulkner Avenue to Cunningham Street 


480 


1979 




Fairfield Road 


from 


Main Street 


1,299 


1946 




Fairmeadow Road 


from 


Nichols Street to Nichols Street 


2,328 


1958 




Fairmont Avenue 


from 


Malloy Road 


952 


1971 




Fairview Avenue 


from 


State Street 


648 


1933 




Faneull Drive 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to beyond Harvard Ave. 


790 


1950 




Faulkner Avenue 


from 


Glen Road to Jacobs Street 


1,946 


1944 


1953 


Fay Street 


from 


Glen Road to Garden Avenue 


714 


1938 


1945 


Federal Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5,740 


1894 




Ferguson Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1,073 


1967 




Fletcher Lane 


from 


Kilmarnock Street to Morgan Road 


792 


1977 




Floradale Avenue 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


627 


1970 




Fordham Road 


from 


North Reading Line 


3,714 


1971 




Forest Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


4,100 


1894 


1976 


Franklin Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


739 


1978 




Frederick Drive 


from 


Salem Street 


1,070 


1966 




Freeport Drive 


from 


Park Street to Lucaya Circle 


2,086 


1979 




Gandalf Way 


from 


Glen Road to Agostino Drive 


549 


1979 




Glen Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Main Street 


6,870 


1894 





82 



STREET 

Glendale Circle 
Glenview Road 
Gowing Road 
Grace Drive 
Grand Street 
Grant Street 
Grove Avenue 
Grove Street 
Gunderson Road 

Hamlin Lane 
Hanson Road 
Hardin Street 
Harnden Street 
Harold Avenue 
Harris Street 
Harvard Avenue 
Hathaway Road 

Hawthorne Road 
Heather Drive 
High Street 
Hillside Way 
Hilltop Road 
Hobson Avenue 
Hopkins Street 

Industrial Way 

Jaquith Road 
Jere Road 
Jones Avenue 
Judith Road 

Kelley Road 
Kendall Street 
Kenwood Avenue 
Kiernan Avenue 
Kilmarnock Street 
King Street 
King Street Ext. 
Kirk Street 



LOCATION LENGTH 

from Glen Road to Lawrence Street 1,304 

from Suncrest Avenue 365 

from Park Street to Marcus Road 941 

from Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Melody Lane 2,514 

from Corey Avenue 815 

from Federal Street 780 

from Main Street to Lake Street 4,147 

from Reading Line 120 

from Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 1,506 

from Lawrence Street 540 

from Woodland Road 838 

from Aldrich Road to Jaquith Road 428 

from Main Street to Glen Road 600 

from Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 1,312 

from Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 806 

from Main Street to River Street 430 

from Woburn Street to Evans Drive 3,270 

from Woburn Street 230 

from Freeport Drive to North Reading Line 1,286 

from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 3,585 

from Chestnut Street to Burlington Line 2,230 

from Suncrest Avenue 364 

from Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 1,560 

from Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 3,051 

from Woburn Street to West Street 4,430 

from Shawsheen Avenue 1,398 

from Fairmeadow Road to Fairmeadow Road 1,248 

from Glen Road 717 

from Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 400 

from Chandler Road 923 

from Aldrich Road to Blanchard Road 1,420 

from Woburn Street to beyond Englewood Drive 1,725 

from Lowell Street to beyond Naples Road 693 

from West Street to beyond Morgan Road 1,840 

from Glen Road to Broad Street 2,400 

from Glen Road 487 

from Main Street 575 



DATE (s) ACCEPTED 



1952 
1959 
1956 
1966 
1952 
1943 
1910 
1957 
1959 



1962 
1969 
1951 
1895 
1971 
1945 
1951 
1951 
1971 
1956 
1979 
1894 
1914 
1959 
1945 
1894 

1974 

1938 
1968 
1940 
1953 

1957 
1945 
1970 
1958 
1894 
1940 
1979 
1951 



1966 



1953 1959 



1951 
1972 



1952 
1975 



1949 1951 



1971 



1945 



Lake Street 
Lang Street 
Laurel Avenue 
Lawrence Court 
Lawrence Street 
Ledgewood Road 
Lexington Street 
Liberty Street 
Lincoln Street 
Linda Road 
Lloyd Road 
Lockwood Road 
Longview Road 
Loumac Road 
Lowell Street 
Lowell Street Park 
Lucaya Circle 



from Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 3,855 

from Bancroft Street 409 

from Parker Street to Molloy Road 659 

from Lawrence Street 728 

from Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive 4,013 

from Suncrest Avenue 383 

from Cunningham Street to Morningside Drive 714 

from Federal Street 740 

from Federal Street 720 

from High Street to beyond Pineridge Road 1,760 

from Main Street 1,050 

from Ballardvale Street 977 

from Middlesex Avenue 650 

from Drury Lane 510 

from Main Street to Reading I ^'ne 10,352 

from Lowell Street 580 

from Heather Drive to Freeport Drive 2,469 



1894 
1952 
1950 
1956 
1956 
1959 
1974 
1943 
1943 
1950 
1951 
1957 
1959 
1963 
1894 
1908 
1979 



1978 
1957 



1958 



33 



STREET 



LOCATION 



Mackey Road 
Magazine Road 
Magazine Street 
Main Street 
Marcia Road 
Marcus Road 
Marie Drive 
Marion Street 
Marjorie Road 
Massachusetts Avenue 
McDonald Road 
Meadow Lane 
Melody Lane 
Middlesex Avenue 
Miles Street 
Miller Road 
Moore Street 
Morgan Road 
Mornings ide Drive 
Morse Avenue 
Mystic Avenue 

Nassau Avenue 
Nathan Road 
Nichols Street 
Nickerson Avenue 
Norfolk Avenue 
North Street 
North Washington Ave. 
Nunn Road 

Oak Street 
Oakdale Road 
Oakridge Circle 
Oakwood Road 
Olson Street 

Park Street 
Parker Street 
Patricia Circle 
Pershing Street 
Phillips Avenue 
Pilling Road 
Pine Avenue 
Pineridge Road 
Pineview Road 
Pinewood Road 
Pleasant Road 
Powder House Circle 
Presidential Drive 
Progress Way 

Radcliff Road 
Railroad Avenue 
Reading Avenue 
Redwood Terrace 
Reed Street 
Richmond Street 
Ridge Road 
Ring Avenue 
River Street 



from Federal Street 

from Wisser Street 

from Tap 1 in Avenue 

from Tewksbury Line to Woburn Line 

from North Street to beyond Carolyn Road 

from Go wing Road 

from Woburn Street to beyond Gunderson Road 
from Burlington Avenue to beyond Clifton Street 
from Main Street 

from Main Street to beyond Brattle Street 

from Salem Street 

from Suncrest Avenue 

from Shawsheen Avenue to Grace Drive 

from Main Street to Salem Street 

from Main Street to Hobson Avenue 

from Glen Road 

from Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Wedgewood Ave. 
from Kilmarnock Street 

from Lexington Street to Fairfield Road 
from Woburn Street to beyond Lawn Street 
from Middlesex Avenue 

from Shawsheen Avenue to Dunton Road 
from Senpek Road 

from Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 
from West Street 

from Carter Lane to Nassau Avenue 
from Middlesex Avenue to Marcia Road 
from Agostino Drive 
from Kelley Road 

from Salem Street 

from Short Street to Judith Road 

from Gowing Road to Gowing Road 

from Main Street to beyond Emerson Street 

from Church Street 

from Woburn Street to North Reading Line 
from Lowell Street to Blackstone Street 
from Dell Drive 
from Federal Street 

from Wild Avenue to beyond Baker Street 

from Hathaway Road 

from Main Street to Hobson Avenue 

from North Street to Linda Road 

from Cobalt Street to Adelman Road 

from Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 

from Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 

from Middlesex Avenue 

from Boutwell Street 

from Industrial Way 

from South Street to Benson Road 
from Clark Street 
from Oakwood Road 
from Kenwood Avenue 

from Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Harold Avenue 

from Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 

from Suncrest Avenue 

from Salem Street to Biggar Avenue 

from Massachusetts Avenue to Harvard Avenue 



84 



him >nr<fn 

STREET 


LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE 


(s) ACCEPTED 


Roberts Road 


from Burlington Avenue to Burlington Avenue 


1,861 


1967 




Rollins Road 


from Marion Street to Fenway Street 


200 


1954 




Roosevelt Road 


from Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1,980 


1946 




Route 62 


from Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 


3,343 


1958 




Royal Street 


from Salem Street 


1,043 


1951 




Salem Street 


from Tewksbury Line to beyond Ballardvale St. 


8,895 


1894 




Salem Street 


from North Reading Line to beyond Woburn St. 


6,475 


1894 




Scaltrito Drive 


from Salem Street 


785 


1974 




School Street 


from Middlesex Avenue to beyond Drury Lane 


1,139 


1915 


1963 


Senpek Road 


from Wildwood Street to Nathan Road 


280 


1971 




Sewell Road 


from Hathaway Road 


300 


1955 




Shady Lane Drive 


from Middlesex Avenue to Lawrence Street 


2,904 


1950 


1958 


Shawsheen Avenue 


from beyond Richard St. to Billerica Line 


11,845 


1894 




Sherburn Place 


from Shawsheen Avenue 


723 


1975 




Sheridan Road 


from Woburn Street to Hathaway Road 


1,021 


1951 


1971 


Sherwood Road 


from Forest Street to Cochrane Road 


445 


1971 




Silver Lake Avenue 


from Lake Street to Dexter Street 


455 


1954 




Sparhawk Drive 


from Park Street to Heather Drive 


361 


1979 




Sprue ewood Road 


from Shady Lane Drive 


690 


1952 




State Street 


from Belmont Avenue to Fairview Avenue 


315 


1933 




S trout Avenue 


from Lowell Street 


908 


1955 




Suncrest Avenue 


from West Street to Ledgewood Road 


1,246 


1954 




Swain Road 


from Burlington Avenue to Forest Street 


2,290 


1922 


1929 


Taft Road 


from Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1,986 


1938 




Taplin Avenue 


from Wisser Street 


461 


1946 




Taplin Avenue 


from Baker Street 


900 


1946 




Temple Street 


from Church Street 


214 


1911 




Thrush Road 


from Salem Street to Marie Drive 


400 


1961 




Thurston Avenue 


from Church Street to beyond Kidder Place 


623 


1907 




Truman Road 


from Hathaway Road 


300 


1953 




Unnamed Street 


from Salem Street to Andover Street 


470 


1958 




Upton Court 


from Andover Street 


500 


1894 




Veranda Avenue 


from Main Street 


847 


1916 




Virginia Road 


from North Reading Line to North Reading Line 


1,105 


1954 




Walker Street 


from Main Street 


423 


1958 




Warren Road 


from Wightman Road to Tewksbury Line 


97 


1954 




Washington Avenue 


from Clark Street to Stone Street 


1,650 


1920 




Webber Street 


from Burlington Avenue 


677 


1969 




Wedgewood Avenue 


from Moore Street 


476 


1967 




West Street 


from Woburn Street to Reading Line 


8,372 


1894 


1978 


Westdale Avenue 


from West Street 


1,211 


1942 




Wicks Circle 


from Everett Avenue 


533 


1971 




Wightman Road 


from Warren Road to Tewksbury Line 


239 


1954 




Wild Avenue 


from Grove Avenue 


1,050 


1910 




Wildwood Street 


from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5,290 


1894 




Williams Avenue 


from Main Street 


706 


1940 




Wilson Street 


from Federal Street 


760 


1943 




Wilton Drive 


from Shawsheen Avenue 


1,151 


1966 




Winchell Road 


from Grove Avenue to Burnap Street 


193 


1945 




Wing Road 


from Woburn Street 


746 


1958 




Wisser Street 


from Main Street to Brand Avenue 


1,146 


1950 




Woburn Street 


from Andover Street to Woburn Line 


23,122 


1894 


1978 


Woodland Road 


from Lowell Street 


1,174 


1969 





85 



Town Meetings 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY - WILMINGTON MASSACHUSETTS 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM, CHURCH STREET - MARCH 4, 1980 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said Town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, 
Tuesday, the fourth day of March 1980 at ten o'clock a.m. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the Election of Candidates of Political Parties for the( 
following offices: Presidential preference; District Members of State Committee (one man and one woman) 
for each Political Party for the First Essex and Middlesex Senatorial District; (35) Members of the 
Democratic Town Committee; (35) Members of the Republican Town Committee. 

The polls will be open from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 



Given under our hands this 11th day of February, A.D. 1980. 



Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington: 

s /Robert J. Cain 

s/Aldo A. Caira 

s /A.John Imbimbo 

s/James F. Banda 

s/Rocco V. DePasquale 



At 9:45 a.m. on March 4, 1980, the Town Clerk read the Town Warrant. All the machines in the six (6) 
precincts were ready and at 10:00 a.m. the Town Clerk declared that the polls were open. 

All the totals from the 25 voting machines plus the absentee ballots were recorded and declaration thereoi 
made, as by law is directed, and were for the following, namely: 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



Presidential Preference 
Jimmy Carter 
Edmund G. Brown, Jr. 
Edward M. Kennedy 
No Preference 
Blanks 
Others 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



State Committee - 



778 
79 
1862 
67 
38 

3 

2827 



1st Essex & Middlesex District 
(Man) 



Barry Y. Weimer 
Robert J. Cain 
Stephen J. O'Leary 
Blanks 



79 
1531 
379 
838 
2827 



85 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY (cont.) 

DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



State Committee - 1st Essex & Middlesex 



(Woman) 

Shirley M. Raynard 187 

Anna M. Visconti 1377 

Blanks 1263 

2827 

Town Committee 

Rocco V. DePasquale 1340 

Ralph D. Peterson 639 

Florence E. Borofsky 609 

Dianna C. Holmes 616 

John Tsicouleas 568 

John W. McCann 683 

Aldo A. Caira 1131 

John L. Markey, Jr. 924 

Anna M. Visconti 1016 

Eleanor F. O'Keefe 684 

John D. Brooks 892 

Margaret H. Quinn 632 

Margaret L. McNeill 600 

James F. Banda 1144 

Lorenzo A. Zaccagnini 605 

Beverly A. Berrigan 624 

Michael J. Bielecki 614 

Joseph F. Courtney 751 

Anthony Visconti 849 

Barbara H. Larson 762 

Peter Enos 792 

Mary L. Cunningham 723 

Simon Cutter 789 

Timothy J. Kane 701 

James R. Miceli 1452 

Alice H. Hooper 637 

Robert J. Cain 1222 

Rose Marie Gatta 601 

George W. Hooper 743 

Elizabeth McLaughlin 590 

Anne Mahoney 649 

Daniel H. Ballou, Jr. 1037 

Mary A. LaFollette 542 

David J. Ballou 900 

Daniel E. O'Keefe 665 
Blanks 71219 

98945 

Total Democratic votes cast 2827 

REPUBLICAN PARTY 

Presidential Preference 

John B. Anderson 270 

Howard H. Baker 55 

George H. Bush 347 

John B. Connolly 6 

Ronald W. Reagan 406 

Robert J. Dole 10 



Presidential Preference (cont.) 

Benjamin Fernandez 1 

Harold Stassen 

Philip M. Crane 9 

No Preference 6 

Blanks 12 

Others 11 

1133 

State Committee - 1st Essex & Middlesex 

(Man) 

William T. Glidden 309 

Robert M. Simons 274 

Blanks 550 

1133 

Town Committee 

Ruth M. Kitchener 439 

Catherine A. Marfleet 409 

Lorraine Kitchener Jones 383 

Madelon C. Slater 357 

Carl L. Noelcke 375 

James S. Fairweather 417 

Patricia A. MacFeeley 358 

Angus B. MacFeeley 352 

William G. Hooper, Jr. 478 

M. Flora Kasabuski 370 

Milton L. Bradford, Jr. 361 

Michael A. Caira 529 

Jane E. Caira 414 

John R. Sanborn 369 

Lulu E. Sanborn 371 

Blanks 11013 

16995 

State Committee - 1st Essex & Middlesex 

(Woman) 

Christine M. Bixby 53 

Alice R. Harris 400 

Nancy J. Luther 131 

Blanks 549 

1133 

Total Republican votes cast 1133 



The polls were closed at 8:00 p.m. at which time 
the Town Clerk announced the total votes cast for 
each candidate. 

Attest: 



Priscilla R.W. Lynch 
Town Clerk 
Wilmington, Mass. 



87 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING AND ELECTION - APRIL 19, 1980 and APRIL 26, 1980 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws o 
said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in 
town affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium, Saturday, the nineteenth of April, A.D. 
1980 at 9:45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 p 
for the election of Town offices: 



ARTICLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named offices, to wit 
Two Selectmen for the term of three years; One Moderator for the term of one year; Two members of the 
School Committee for the term of three years; One member of the Housing Authority for a term of five years 
One member of the Regional Vocational Technical School Committee for the term of three years; One member 
of the Redevelopment Authority for the term of three years (unexpired term) . 

QUESTION No. 1. Shall the town vote to accept the provision of section thirteen of Chapter two hundred 
and fifty-eight of the General Laws which provides that the Town shall indemnify and save harmless 
municipal officers elected or appointed from personal financial loss and expense including reasonable 
legal fees and cost, if any, in an amount not to exceed one million dollars, arising out of any claim, 
demand, suit or judgment by reason of any act or omission except an intentional violation of civil rights 
of any person under any law, if the official at the time of such act or omission was acting within the 
scope of his official duties or employment? 

Yes 



No 



You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 

Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and 

meet in Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street in said Town of Wilmington, on Saturday 

the twenty-sixth day of April, A.D., 1980 at 1:30 p.m., then and there to act on the following articles: 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan 
at 9:45 a.m. and as much of the Warrant as is noted above was read and upon a motion by Mr. Stanley Webber 
it was seconded and it was voted to dispense with further reading of the Warrant. 



All voting machines were opened and the zero sheets were posted so that the candidates could examine them 
before the polls were opened. The checkers were prepared with their voting lists and voter identificatioi 
cards and everything was in readiness at 10:00 a.m. 



The polls were declared open at 10:00 a.m. by the Town Clerk, Priscilla R.W. Lynch. 

At 8:00 p.m. the polls were declared closed and the printer packs were removed from the back of the 
voting machines and one copy was given to the tally clerks, one was posted outside the railing so that 
each condidate could add up his own totals at once. There were eighty- five (85) absentee ballots cast 
which were added to the machine totals. 

The Town Clerk read the results of this election at 9:15 p.m. 

All the totals from the twenty-five machines plus the absentee ballots were recorded and declaration 
thereof made, as by law is directed and were for the following: 



in 



SELECTMEN 
Elected 



Elected 



Three years (Vote for two) 

A. John Imbimbo, 22 Cottage Street 

Carl A. Backman, Jr., 11 Lawrence Street 

Daniel H. Ballou, Jr., 62 Park Street 

Colin A. Banfield, 529 Shawsheen Ave. 

Richard E. Gifford, 34 Lowell Street 



1015 
965 

1713 
50 
34 



88 



TOWN ELECTION (continued) 



SELECTMEN - Three years (Vote for two continued) 

Anne D. Linehan, 21 Dadant Drive 411 
Gerald O'Reilly, 65 Wildwood Street 434 
Blanks 444 

5066 

MODERATOR - One year (Vote for one) 

Elected John M. Callan, 571 Woburn St. 1534 
Blanks 999 

2533 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE - Three years (Vote for two) . 

Elected John D. Brooks, 300 Salem Street 1632 
Elected Lester E. White, 29 Marcus Road 1382 
Elmer F. Parker, 11 Forest Street 549 
Arthur W. Ryder, 17 Main Street 492 
Blanks 1011 

5066 

WILMINGTON HOUSING AUTHORITY - Five years (Vote for one ) 

Elected Kevin J. McMillan, 24 Parker Street 1678 
Blanks 855 

2533 

WILMINGTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY - Three years (Vote for one) (unexpired team ) 

Bernard J. LaVita, 32 Lucaya Circle 392 

Elected Daniel R. Stewart, 53 Middlesex Avenue 1625 
Blanks 516 

2533 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE - Three years 

Elected Lawrence P. Flaherty, 6 Hobson Avenue 1833 

Blanks 700 

2533 

Question No. 1. 

"Shall the town vote to accept the provisions of section thirteen of Chapter two hundred and fifty-eight 
of the General Laws which provides that the town shall indemnify and save harmless municipal officers, 
elected or appointed, from personal financial loss and expense including reasonable legal fees and cost, 
if any, in an amount not to exceed one million dollars, arising out of any claim, demand, suit or judg- 
ment by reason of any act or omission except an intentional violation of civil rights of any person under 
any law, if the official at the time of such act or omission was acting within the scope of his official 
duties or employment?" 

Yes 616 
No 308 
Blanks 1609 
2533 

All elected officials present were immediately sworn to the faithful performance of their duties by the 
Town Clerk. 

There were Two Thousand Five Hundred and Thirty-three {2533) votes cast. 
Attest: 

Priscilla R.W. Lynch 
Town Clerk 
Wilmington, Mass. 



89 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING (continued) 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING. WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS - APRIL 26, 1980 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed by the Revised !j 
By-Laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified 
to vote in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium, in said Town of Wilmington, on 
Saturday the 26th day of April A.D. , 1980 at 1:30 p.m., then and there to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate funds by borrowing or transfer for the purpose oil 
providing money for the salary account of the Fire Department; or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money by borrowing or transfer for the 
purpose of paying for the holiday granted by the Governor and General Court in celebration of the visit 
of Pope John Paul II to the Commonwealth; or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money by borrowing or transfer for the 
purpose of funding the Vocational Training Account #610; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant, or a certified copy thereof, with your doings 
thereon to the Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 24th day of March, A.D. 1980. Selectmen of Town of Wilmingtoi 

s/Rocco V. DePasquale 
s /James F. Banda 
s/Robert J. Cain 
s /A. John Imbimbo 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS - APRIL 26, 1980 

At 1:50 p.m. the Moderator called the meeting to order there being a quorum present. The meeting was 
opened with a Flag Service by the Girl Scouts. Father Thomas Reynolds, of St. Thomas Chuch gave the 
opening prayer which was followed by a moment of silence for deceased members of the community, George 
Anderson, John Apiaro, E. Hayward Bliss, Ernest Cail, and Lena Cavanaugh, all having passed on during the 
past year. 

At 2:00 p.m. the Moderator opened the Special Town Meeting, a motion by Sterling C. Morris followed: 

"I move that the Special Town Meeting called for Saturday, April 26, 1980 at 1:30 p.m. be recessed until 

the completion of warrant Articles 2 through 6 of the Annual Town Meeting." Motion so voted and seconded. 

The Moderator, John Callan opened the Annual Town Meeting at 2:05 p.m. He began reading the warrant until 
he was interrupted by Sterling C. Morris. "I move that the Moderator dispense with further reading of 
the Warrant and take up and make reference to each article by number." Motion so voted and seconded. 

ARTICLE 2. To hear reports of Committees and act thereon. Mr. DePasquale, "I move that we pass over 
Article 2." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of 
paying unpaid bills of previous years, or do anything in relation thereto. Mr. Imbimbo, "I move that 
we pass over Article 3." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year begin- 
ning July 1, 1980 in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue 
a note or notes therefor payable within one year, and to renew any notes therefor payable within one year 
and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, or do anything in relation thereto. Motion by Robert Cain, same 
as above. Motion so voted, seconded and voted unanimously. 



90 



ARTICLE 5. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and the salaries 
of several Town Officers and Departments and determine how the same shall he raised, whether by taxation, 
transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. 

At this point the Moderator alerted the voters to the Governors Tax Cap, and explained that we needed a 
2/3rds or a unanimous vote to insure legal acceptance of our total budget. 

Motion by Walter Kaminski of the Finance Committee, "I move that the several sums as recommended by the 
Finance Committee be raised by taxation or by transfer from available funds and appropriated for the 
purpose set forth in Article 5, each item to be taken up and voted on, subject to amendment." Motion 
seconded and so voted. 

ACCORDINGLY THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WERE VOTED BY TAXATION OR TRANSFER : 

The Moderator asked that we take the smaller departments with a few line items and vote the totals of each 



unless questioned or amended. Each item voted was a unanimous vote unless otherwise noted. 

GENERAL GOVERNME NT 

Selectmen - Legislative 

Salaries 2,500.00 

Expenses 6,450.00 

8,950.00 

Selectmen - Elections 

Salaries 14,000.00 

Expenses 9,200.00 

23,200.00 

Registrar of Voters 

Salaries 2,000.00 

Expenses 8,200.00 

10,200.00 

Finance Committee 

Salary 800.00 

Expenses 4,240.00 

(Vote was questionable, standing vote was taken. Yes 339 No 5 - So voted.) 5,040.00 

Town Manager 

Salary - Town Manager 34,665.00 

Other Salaries 34,681.00 

Expenses 1, 150. 00 

70,496.00 

Town Accountant 

Salary - Town Accountant 22,585.00 

Other Salaries 14,678.00 

Expenses 750.00 

Capital Outlay 

38,013.00 

Treasurer 

Salary 16,798.00 

Other Salaries 13,891.00 

Expenses 1,100.00 

Tax Title Foreclosures 12,000.00 

43,789.00 

Collector 

Salary - Collector 17,623.00 

Other Salaries 13,891.00 

Expenses 4,760.00 

36,274.00 



91 



Town Clerk 

Salary - Town Clerk $ 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay . 

Board of Assessors 

Salary - Principal Assessor 

Other Salaries ........ 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Town Counsel 

Salary (Retainer) 

Expenses (Court Appearances) 

Town Hall 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Planning Board 

Salary . . . . . . . . . ... ... . . . ... . . . 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT ■. 

PROTECTION PERSONS & PROPERTY 
Police Department 

Salaries - Chief 

Lieutenant 

Sergeants 

Patrolmen 

(Motion by Walter Kaminski: "I move that the sum of $418,501 be appropriated for 
Police Department Salaries - Patrolmen; the sum of $300,000 to be raised by trans- 
fer from the Revenue Sharing Account, and the balance of $118,501 to be raised by 
taxation." Motion by Sterling Morris: "I move that the motion made by the 
Finance Committee be amended and the sum of $432,501 be appropriated for Police 
Department Salaries - Patrolmen; the sum of $300,000 to be raised by transfer from 
the Revenue Sharing Account, and the balance of $132,501 to be raised by taxation. 
The second motion was voted on, since this was the larger amount, after being 
seconded, and was so voted by a majority vote. The main motion as amended was then 
voted by a unanimous vote. $300,000 to be raised by transfer from the Revenue 
Sharing Account, and the balance of $132,501 to be raised by taxation.) 

Traffic Supervisors 

Clerks 

Vacation - Fill-in Cost ' 

Sick Leave - Fill-in Cost 

Miscellaneous Extra Details 

Paid Holiday 

Police Dog 

Specialists 

Night Shift Differential 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 



15,750.00 
13,498.00 
650.00 
1.800.00 
31,698.00 



27,405.00 
23,831.00 
3,200.00 



54,436.00 



15,000.00 
10.000.00 
25,000.00 



24,111.00 
21,675.00 



45,786.00 



14,650.00 



14,650.00 

407,532.00 



28,244.00 
21,733.00 
118,566.00 
132,501.00 



25,433 
38,000 
25,000 
35,000 
27,796 
1,200 
4,650 
8,500 
44,018 
1.633 



512,274 





.00 
.00 
,00 
,00 
,00 
,00 
,00 
,00 
,00 
.00 
,00 



92 



Constable 
Salaries 



$ 



100.00 



Fire Department 

Salary - Chief 28,244.00 

Deputy Chief 23,967.00 

Lieutenants 79,028.00 

Privates 168,005.00 

(Motion by Walter Kaminski; "I move that the sum of $468,005 be appropriated for 
Fire Department Salaries - Privates; and that the sum of $300,000 be raised by 
transfer from Revenue Sharing Account and the balance of $168,005 be raised by 
taxation." Motion by Sterling Morris: "I move to amend motion made by the 
Finance Committee and that the sum of $451,282 be appropriated for Fire Depart- 
ment Salaries - Privates; and that the sum of $300,000 be raised by transfer 
from the Revenue Sharing Account and the balance of $151,282 to be raised by 
taxation." Both motions were seconded. The Finance Committee motion being the 
larger amount was voted on first. The motion passed unanimously. The second 
motion was then passed over and not voted upon. $300,000 appropriated by transfer 
from Revenue Sharing Account, and $168,005 to be raised by taxation.) 

Call Fire & Ambulance 22,500.00 

Vacation - Fill-in Cost . 50,000.00 

Sick Leave - Fill-in Cost 22,000.00 

(Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate by 
taxation the sum of $22,000 for the Fire Department Sick Leave Fill-in cost." 
The motion was seconded and voted. Yes 258 No 192. The main motion was then 
seconded and voted. Yes 278 No 193 Motion passed by majority vote.) 

Paid Holidays 25,611.00 

Expenses 16,764.00 

Capital Outlay 4,000.00 

440,119.00 



Civil Defense 

Salary 1,500.00 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 1,600.00 

3,100.00 



Dog Officer 

Salary 5,200.00 

(Motion by Joseph Balestrieri: "I move that the line item Dog Officer salary be 
amended to $14,500 in order to make this a full time position in the Town. Motion 
was seconded and so voted. The amendment was defeated. The main motion of $5200 
was then voted unanimously.) 

Expenses 4,000.00 

Capital Outlay 50.00 

9,250.00 



Building Inspector 

Salary - Building Inspector 19,920.00 

Other Salaries 13,051.00 

Expenses 1,725.00 

Capital Outlay 

34,696.00 

Board of Appeals 

Salary 2,500.00 

Expenses 260.00 

Capital Outlay 

2,760.00 



93 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Salary 

Expenses 



TOTAL PROTECTION PERSONS AND PROPERTY 
PUBLIC WO RKS 

Salary - Town Engineer. . - 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Highway 

Salary - Superintendent 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Gasoline, Oil, Diesel Fuel 

Capital Outlay 

Drainage Projects 

Sidewalk Program 

Public Street Lights 

Road Machinery - Expenses 

Gasoline, Oil, Diesel Fuel \ 

Capital Outlay - Auto Fuel Control 

Chapter 90 Construction 

(Motion by Mr. Kaminski: "I move that the sum of $43,233 be appropriated for 
Chapter 90 Construction; $43,232 to be raised by transfer from the Chapter 480 
Acts of 1979 Account, with a balance of zero to be raised by taxation." Motion 
seconded and so voted. The main motion as amended was then vo ted, unanimous ly . ) 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 

(Motion by Mr. Kaminski: "I move that the sum of $33,531 be appropriated from 
Chapter 90 Maintenance; $33,531 to be raised by transfer from Chapter 480, Acts 
1979 Account, with a balance of zero to be raised by taxation. The main motion 
then was voted as amended. Motion so voted unanimously.") 

Chapter 81 Maintenance 

Expenses A 

Snow & Ice Control 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Gasoline, Oil, Diesel Fuel 

Capital Outlay 

Tree Warden 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Dutch Elm Control 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Gypsy Moth Control 

Salaries 

Expenses 



94 



Cemetery 

Salary Superintendent $ 18,723.00 

Other Salaries 

(Motion by Mr. Kaminski: "I move that the sum of $64,263 be appropriated for the 

Cemetery Department Other Salaries Account; $8,881 to be raised by transfer from the 

sale of Cemetery Lots Account; $20,774 to be raised from the Interest on Cemetery 

Trust Funds Account, and the balance of $34,608 to be raised by taxation." Motion so 

seconded and voted. The main motion as amended voted unanimously. 34,608.00 

Expenses 15,300.00 

Capital Outlay 3,950.00 

72,581.00 

Parks 

Salaries 3,000.00 

Expenses 2,500.00 

Capital Outlay 

5,500.00 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 1,217,510.00 

HEALTH & SANITATION 
Board of Health 

Salary - Director 23,407.00 

Other Salaries 52,175.00 

Expenses 2,050.00 

Hospital & Medical Care 850.00 

Solid Waste Disposal 215,000.00 

Drug Dependency Problems 13,500.00 

Mental Health Out Patient 17,000.00 

TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION 323,982.00 

VETERANS' AID 

Veterans' Aid & Benefits 

Salaries - Part time Agent 2,860.00 

Other Salaries 11,708.00 

Expenses 325.00 

Assistance - Veterans 20,000.00 

TOTAL VETERANS ' AID 34,893.00 

MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 
School Maintenance & Operations 

Salary - Superintendent 22,924.00 

Salaries - Others 728,869.00 

Expenses 122,940.00 

Fuel Heating 478,000.00 

Roof Repairs 

Cost of Vandalism 18,000.00 

Capital Outlay 15,500.00 

1,386,233.00 

School Grounds Maintenance 

Expenses 9,800.00 

Capital Outlay 

9,800.00 

Town Building Maintenance 

Expenses 60,080.00 

Electricity 33,000.00 

Capital Outlay 

(Motion by Sterling C. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
by taxation the sum of $38,000 for the Town Building Maintenance Capital Outlay 
Account. Motion seconded and so voted. The main motion was then voted by a 



95 



Maintenance of Public Buildings (continued) 

standing vote. Yes 331 No 71. Motion so voted.) $ 

TOTAL MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

LIBRARY 

Board of Library Trustees 

Salary - Director 

Salaries - Other 

Expenses. . 

(Motion by Walter Kaminski: "I move that the sum of $61,745 be appropriated for 
the Library Expense Account; $6,828 to be raised by transfer from the State Aid 
to Libraries Account, transfer of $2,434 interest from the Library Trust Funds 
and the balance of $52,483 to be raised by taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. 
Main motion voted unanimously.) 

Capital Outlay 

RECREATION 

Salary - Director 

Salaries - Other 

Expenses 

TOTAL RECREATION 

BEAUTIFICATION COMMITTEE 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Personal Services 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Harnden Tavern 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Personal Services 

Expenses 

(Motion by Rocco DePasquale: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
by taxation the sum of $4,325 for personal services and expenses of the Conser- 
Commission." Motion so voted and seconded, unanimously.) 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

(Motion by Walter Kaminski: "I move that the sum of $8,466,136 be appropriated for the 
School Department Account, and that the said sum be reduced in the amount of $90,000 from 
available Public Law 874, Public Law 85-864 Funds, with the balance of $8,376,136 to be 
raised by taxation." Motion seconded. Second motion made by Lester White, School Committee, 
"I move that it be and hereby is the determination of the School Committee that the sum 
of $8,637,830 is the amount necessary for the support and operation of the public schools 
in the Town of Wilmington for the 1980-81 fiscal year as voted by the Wilmington School 
Committee at their meeting of February 13, 1980; said vote being five (5) in favor and one 
(1) opposed, and that the budget for 1980-81 be reduced by the estimated remaining unspent 
funds in the federal accounts under Public Laws 864 and 874 in the amount of $90,000 leav- 
ing an amount of $8,547,830 to be raised by taxation. Motion seconded. Second motion was 
voted on first, it being the motion with the larger figure. Motion passed by vote of Yes 
427 No 93. First motion was then voted unanimously. 

Vocational Training 

Regional Vocational School District 

TOTAL SCHOOL DEPARTMENT $ 



38.000.00 
131,080.00 
1,527,113.00 



22,279.00 
137,029.00 



52,483.00 



211,791.00 



21,357.00 
78,595.00 
31.340.00 
131,292.00 



500.00 
700.00 






1,200.00 



3,500.00 
825.00 
4,325.00 



8,547,830.00 

9,308.00 
607.200.00 

9,164,338.00 



96 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Personal Services $ 16,000.00 

Expenses 31,897.00 

Capital Outlay 

47,897.00 

MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 

Schools 339,355.00 

General Government 98,707.00 

Water 

(Motion by Walter Kaminski: "I move that the sum of $409,845 be appropriated for 
Maturing Debt and Interest - Water; $409,845 to be raised by transfer from Water 
Available Surplus, with a balance of zero to be raised by taxation." Motion seconded 
and voted unanimously. Main motion as amended was also voted unanimously.) 

Sewer 224,630.00 

Authentication Fees & Misc. Debt 50,000.00 

TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 712,692.00 

UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 

Insurance & Bonds 248,439.00 

Reserve Fund 50,000.00 

Blue Cross - Blue Shield & Group Life 26,168.00 

(Motion by Walter Kaminski: "I move that the sum of $486,168 be appropriated for 
Blue Cross-Blue Shield and Group Life; $460,000 to be raised by transfer from 
Free Cash and the balance of $26,168 to be raised by taxtion." Motion seconded 
and so voted unanimously.) 

Local Transportation 4,580.00 

Town Report 3,000.00 

Sewer Maintenance 15,000.00 

250th Year Anniversary Committee 

Appraisals - E.D.P. & Inventories 7,500.00 

Training & Conference - In State 7,750.00 

Training & Conference - Out of State 1,000.00 

Veteran's Retirement 46,000.00 

Employees Retirement (Unused Sick Leave) 20,000.00 

Incentive Pay-Police 21,700.00 

Incentive Pay-Fire & E.M.T 16,500.00 

1980 Salary Adjustments & Additional Cost 195,000.00 

Additional Employees 

Unemployment Payments - Town & School 30,000.00 

Microfilming & Reader 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 692,637.00 

(Upon the completion of the Fiscal 1981 Budget a motion was made by the Town Manager Sterling C. Morris: 
"I move that the Town vote to approve the Fiscal 1981 Budget, tax appropriation, use of available funds, 
and tax levy, except the Fiscal 1981 Budget of the School Committee, and to exceed the tax limits as 

provided for under MGL Chapter 151 of the Acts of 1979 so that the Town's Fiscal 1981 Budget, or tax 
appropriation, or tax levy shall be exceeded by the sum of $356,077 if necessary to meet the approved 
Fiscal 1981 Budget. Motion seconded and so voted. Yes 282 No 81. A motion was then made by Mr. A. 

Berman: "I move that the line item of Sick Leave Fill-In cost for the Fire Department excess of $8,000. 

not to be included in the total budget since it did not pass by a 2/3rd majority. This was a lesser 
amount and not voted upon. 

Motion by Lester White: "I move that the Town vote to approve the Fiscal 1981 Budget of the School 
Committee and to exceed the tax cap limits as provided for under MGL Chapter 151 of the Acts of 1979 

and to exceed the limits by the sum of $242,372 if necessary to meet the approved Fiscal 1981 Budget 
under Article 5." Motion seconded and so voted. Yes 358 No 53. 



97 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of several 
following items of capital expenditures and further to authorize the sale or turn-in, if any, of the several 
items listed below, and for the use of the several departments so designated; or do anything in relation 
thereto : 

a. Accountant's Office 

Motion by Sterling Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$18,000 for the purchase of a bookkeeping machine for the use of the Town Accountant's office. Finance 
Committee approved $18,000. Motion seconded and so voted. Yes 308 No 75. 

b. Police Department 

To purchase four Police vehicles. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $30,000 for the 
purchase of four Police vehicles, and at the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in 
of the vehicles presently used by the Police Department." Finance Committee approved $22,500. Motion 
lost. Yes 114 No 274. Second motion by Sterling Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation 
and appropriate the sum of $22,500 the recommdation of the Finance Committee for three cruisers. This 
motion was seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

c. Fire Department 

To purchase a vehicle to be used by Fire Chief. 

Motion by Sterling Morris. "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$6500 for the purchase of a vehicle to be used by the Fire Chief, and at the discretion of the Town 
Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of the vehicle presently used." Finance Committee approved $6500. 
Motion so voted, unanimously. 

d. Highway Department 

1. To purchase one dump truck with coverall assembly. 

Motion by Sterling Morris" "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$26,911 for the purchase of a dump truck with coverall assembly for the use of the Highway Department 
and at the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a dump truck presently used by 
the Highway Department." Finance Committee approved $26,911. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

2. To purchase one pick-up truck. 

Motion by Sterling Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation the sum of $6,178 for the 
purchase of a pick-up truck for the use of the Highway Department and at the discretion of the Town 
Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a pick-up truck presently used by the Highway Department. 
Finance Committee approved $6,178. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

e. Tree Department 
To purchase one dump truck with hydraulic crane. 

Motion by Sterling Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$26,951 for the purchase of one dump truck with winch for the use of the Tree Department and at the 
discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a truck presently used by the tree 
department." Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Motion seconded and voted by standing vote. 
Motion lost. Yes 157 No 209. 

f. Public Buildings 

1. To purchase one pick-up truck. 

Motion by Sterling Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$7,465 for the purchase of a pick-up truck for the use of the Public Buildings Department, and at the 
discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a pick-up truck presently used by the 
Public Buildings Department." Motion seconded and voted by standing vote. Finance Committee recommends 
diapproval. Motion lost. Yes 62 No 228. 

2. To purchase one 1% ton stake truck. 

Motion by Sterling Morris: "I move that we pass over this item." Finance Committee recommends 
disapproval. Motion seconded and voted to pass over. 



98 



ARTICLE 6. (continued) 

3. Irrigation system for High School football field. 

Motion by Sterling Morris: "I move that the Town vote to pass over this article and take no action 
thereon." Motion seconded and so voted to pass over. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. 

4. Replace bleachers for High School football field. 

Motion by Sterling Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$2,300 to cover the cost of replacing bleachers on High School football field." Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion so voted, unanimously. 

5. Irrigation system for North Intermediate soccer and ballfield. Finance Committee recommends 
disapproval. Motion by Sterling Morris: "I move that we pass over this article and take no action 
thereon." Motion seconded and so voted to pass over. 

6. Renovations to Shawsheen School playing field. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Motion by 
Sterling Morris: "I move that we pass over this article and take no action thereon." Motion seconded and 
so voted to pass over. 

7. Install fence Woburn Street School. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Motion by Leslie A. 
Ciampi: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $46,000 to install a 
fence and for renovation to the playing field at the Woburn Street School." Motion seconded and standing 
vote was taken. Yes 140 No 172. Motion lost. This item was reconsidered at 10:50 p.m. later during the 
meeting and the motion was again defeated. 

Council on Aging 
To purchase 15 passenger van. 
Letter from Rotary Board of Directors 

Dear Mr. Morris: 

At the April 9th meeting of the Rotary Board of Directors, a discussion took place regarding a gift to 
the Town of Wilmington in recognition of its 250th Anniversary. 

I am pleased to announce to you that the Board of Directors voted unanimously to donate a sum in the 
amount of $5,000; said amount to be specifically applied toward the purchase of a 15 passenger van for 
the Council of the Aging. In so doing. Rotary recognized the Senior Citizens of Wilmington and their 
many contributions to the community over the past years. 

It is our pleasure to again assist the citizens of Wilmington. 

Sincerely, 

David Milot, President 

Motion by Sterling C. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to accept a gift of $5,000 from the Wilmington 
Rotary Club as provided for under the provisions of MGL Chapter 44, Section 53A and to raise by taxation 
and appropriate the sum of $4,032 for the purchase of a 15 passenger van for the use of the Council on 
Aging, and at the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of the vehicle presently 
used by the Council on Aging. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 



At this point in the meeting Bill Belbin, made the motion that we recess for dinner, 
and so voted. The Moderator declared we recess from 5:45 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. 



Motion was seconded 



The evening meeting reconvened at 7:45 p.m. with the Special Town Meeting, a quorum being present. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate funds by borrowing or transfer for the purpose 
of providing money for the salary account of the Fire Department; or do anything in relation thereto. 
Motion by Sterling C. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to transfer from the 1979-80 Budget, Snow and 
Ice Control Account #325, the sum of $20,000 to the Fire Department Department Account #205 as follows: 
Vacation Fill-in Cost $6,000 Sick Leave Fill-in Cost $4,000 and Call Fire & Ambulance $10,000. 
Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 



99 



Special Town Meeting (continued) 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money by borrowing or transfer for the 
purpose of paying for the holiday granted by the Governor and General Court in celebration of the visit of 
Pope John Paul II, to the Commonwealth; or do anything in relation thereto. Motion by Robert J. Cain: "I 
move that the Town vote to transfer from the 1979-80 Budget, Snow and I ce Control Account $325, the sum of 
$4,430 to be appropriated as follows: Police Department Account #200, Paid Holidays $2,104; Fire Department ' 
Account #205, Paid Holidays $2,326." Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money by borrowing or transfer for the 
purpose of funding the Vocational Training Account #610; or do anything in relation thereto. Motion by 
Daniel Ballou, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to transfer from the 1979-80 Budget, Snow and Ice Control 
Account #325, the sum of $6,100 to the Vocational Training Account #610." Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously. 

The business of the Special Town Meeting was concluded at 7:50 p.m. and was then adjourned. 
The Annual Town Meeting then reconvened at 7:52 p.m. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $3,000 for the observance of 
Memorial Day and Veterans Day and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange and have charge of 
said observances, or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion by 
Daniel Ballou, Jr: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $3,000 for the 
observance of Memorial Day and Veterans' Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange 
and have charge of said observances. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $750 each (or total of $1,500.00) 
for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended the 
lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for 
the Nee-Ellsworth Post No. 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. 

b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the 
Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by: Daniel Ballou, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$750 each (or a total of $1,500.) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of 
the General Laws as amended the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for 
the Nee-Ellsworth Post No. 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. 

b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the 
Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion. 

Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Motion was seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen or the Town Manager to apply for 
accept, and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds, without further 
appropriations, allotted to Wilmington by the Federal Government of the United States under any federal grant 
program; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Rocco DePasquale: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen or the Town 
Manager to apply for, accept, and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds, 
without further appropriations, allotted to Wilmington by the Federal Government of the United States under 
any federal grant program." Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of under- 
taking and completing a property equalization program in accordance with the laws of the Commonwealth; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 



100 



ARTICLE 10. (continued) 



Motion by Robert Cain: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $125,000 
for the purpose of undertaking and completing a property equalization program in accordance with the laws of 
the Commonwealth." Motion seconded and so voted. A standing voted was taken Yes 43 No 243. Motion lost. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the provisions of Chapter 90, Section 18a, of the General 
Laws authorizing the Board of Selectmen to enact regulations governing the use of ways by pedestrians; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert Cain: "I move that the vote to adopt the provisions of Chapter 90, Section 18a, of the 
General Laws authorizing the Board of Selectmen to enact regulations governing the use of ways by pedestrians; 
or do anything in relation thereto." Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to adopt provisions of Chapter 40, Section 22d, of the Mass. General 
Laws authorizing the Board of Selectmen to enact regulations authorizing the removal and towing of motor 
vehicles from certain locations; and do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Rocco DePasquale: "I move that the Town vote to adopt provisions of Chapter 40, Section 22d, of the 
General Laws authorizing the Board of Selectmen to enact regulations authorizing the removal and towing of 
motor vehicles from certain locations." Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following sums of money as a gift and to establish 
deposits or trust funds therefor in accordance with the instructions of the donor or trust; if any: 



or do anthing in relation thereto. 

Motion by A. John Imbimbo: "I move that the Town vote to accept the following sums of money as a gift and to 
establish deposits or trust funds therefor in accordance with the instructions of the donor or trust; if any: 
Sara Carter Common Fund $200; Library Fund - Chester W. Clark $500; Library Fund - Charlotte C. Smith $500; 
Walker Fund - Sears Cook Walker $257. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimous ly . 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a gift the sum of two thousand ninety-nine and 25/100 
($2,099.25) dollars together with any accrued interest from the Wilmington Rehabilitation Committee, an 
organization originally established after World War II for the purpose of aiding returning veterans and which 
Committee has ceased to function, said monies to be expended at the direction of the Board of Selectmen and 
Town Manager for the betterment of the veterans' plot at the Wildwood Cemetery; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Daniel Ballou, Jr: "I move that the Town vote to accept as a gift the sum of $2,099.25 together 
with any accrued interest from the Wilmington Rehabilitation Committee, an organization originally established 
after World War II for the purpose of aiding returning veterans and which Committee has ceased to function, 
said monies to be expended at the direction of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager for the betterment of 
the veterans' plot at the Wildwood Cemetery. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and 
so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to rescind Article 11 of the 1978 Annual Town Meeting and to 
authorize the Water and Sewer Commission to construct a septage disposal station on Main Street on Town-owned 
land described as Map 39, Parcel 9, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation 
or transfer from available funds by borrowing or otherwise; do do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by George R. Allan, Water and Sewer Commission: "I move that the Town vote to rescind Article 11 of 
the 1978 Annual Town Meeting and to authorize the Water and Sewer Commission to construct a Septage Disposal 
Station on Main Street on Town-owned land described as Map 39, Parcel 9, and that the appropriation be raised 
by transfer from Sewer Department Account #370." Mr. Allan explained that the amount of $35,000 had been voted 
at the Town Meeting of 1978, and that this new proposal is estimated to cost $20,000. Finance Committee 



Sara Carter Common Fund 
Library Fund -Chester W. Clark 
Library Fund -Charlotte C. Smith 
Walker Fund - Sears Cook Walker 



$200.00 
500.00 
500.00 
257 00 



101 



ARTICLE 15. (continued) 

recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to amend the vote adopted under Article 12 of the Warrant for the 
Special Town Meeting held on June 23, 1975, so as to provide that State and Federal aid received as a 
contribution toward the cost of the project for constructing sewers, sewerage systems and sewage treatment 
and disposal facilities shall be applied to the cost of such project (the present estimated cost of which is 
$10,600,000) in addition to the sums appropriated and authorized to be borrowed pursuant to the vote under 
said Article 12, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Sterling C. Morris: "I move that the vote adqpted under Article 12 of the Warrant for the Special 
Town Meeting held on June 23, 1975 be and hereby is amended so that said vote shall provide that any state 
and federal aid received as a contribution toward the cost of the sewer project described therein shall be 
applied to the cost of such project (the present estimated cost of which if $10,600,000) in addition to the 
sums appropriated and authorized to be borrowed under Article 12." Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Standing vote was taken. Motion seconded and so voted. Yes 181 No 103. Article lost for want of 2/3rds 
vote. 

ARTICLE 17. (See letter below) 

February 7, 1980 

Mrs. Priscilla R. W. Lynch 
Town Clerk 
Town Hall 

Wilmington, MA 01887 
Dear Mrs. Lynch: 

I wish to file with you the following statement in accordance with Section 10 of Chapter 43B of the General 
Laws : 

I propose that Chapter 592 of the Acts of 1950, an Act Establishing a Town Manager Form of Government for 
the Town of Wilmington, be amended by changing the date under Section 17, from the Twentieth day of 
December to ninety days prior to the Annual Town Meeting. 

Very truly yours, 

(s) Sterling C. Morris, Town Manager 



ARTICLE 17. (continued) To see if the Town will vote to amend, in accordance with the Home Rule 
Procedures Act, Chapter 592 of Acts of 1950, entitled "An Act Establishing a Town Manager Form of Govern- 
ment for the Town of Wilmington" by changing the date under Section 17, from the twentieth day of December 
to ninety (90) days prior to the Annual Town Meeting. This amendment shall take effect 31 days after the 
election at which this charter amendment is approved; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Sterling C. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to amend, in accordance with the Home Rule 
Procedures Act, Chapter 592 of the Acts of 1950, entitled "An Act Establishing a Town Manager Form of 
Government for the Town of Wilmington" by changing the date under Section 17, from the twentieth day of 
December to ninety days prior to the Annual Town Meeting." This amendment shall take effect 31 days after 
the election at which this charter amendment is approved. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the action taken under Article 29 of the Adjourned 
Annual Town Meeting on March 8, 1969 concerning the authorization to float a bond issue for the purpose of 
constructing a railroad bridge over Shawsheen Avenue; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert Cain: "I move that the Town vote to rescind the action taken under Article 29 of the 
Adjourned Annual Town Meeting on March 8, 1969 concerning the authorization to float a bond issue for the 
purpose of constructing a railroad bridge over Shawsheen Avenue." Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted. 



102 




ARTICLE 19. 



To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court for the enact- 
ment of special legislation for and on behalf of the Town of Wilmington in substantially the following form, 
to wit: 

Section 1. The Town of Wilmington is hereby authorized to appropriate and pay to Warren Five Cents Savings 
Bank of Peabody the sum of ninety-one and 53/100 ($91.53) dollars, the same being the amount 
collected by the said Town from Warren Five Cents Savings Bank as taxes in the year 1979 upon 
certain real property in said Town. 

Section 2. Any action taken by the Town of Wilmington at its Annual Town Meeting held in the current year or 
at any adjourned session thereof pursuant to the authority contained in this act is hereby vali- 
dated and confirmed and shall have the same effect as though this act were in full force and 
effect on the date of the posting the Warrant for such Meeting. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by A. John Imbimbo: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the 
General Court for the enactment of Special legislation for and on behalf of the Town of Wilmington in 
substantially the following form, to wit:" The motion follows the main motion to the letter. Motion was 
then seconded and so voted, unanimously. Finance Committee recommends approval. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell and convey to Jackson 
Brothers, Inc. a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as Parcel 22 on Assessors Map 19, subject to such 
terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine and further to set a minimum amount to be paid for such 
conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Leland H. Jackson: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell and 
convey to Jackson Brothers, Inc. a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as Parcel 22 on Assessors Map 19, 
subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minimum amount of 
$750 to be paid for such conveyance. Finance Committee recommends approval, $750. Planning Board recommends 
approval. Motion seconded and a standing vote was taken. Yes 274 No 1. Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington by adding under Chapter 5: PROHIBITED PARKING, FIRE LANES, SECTION 36 

A. Fire Regulations: It shall be unlawful to obstruct or block a private way with a vehicle or other means 
so as to prevent access by fire apparatus or equipment to any multiple family building, stores, shopping 
centers, schools and places of public assembly. 

B. Fire Lanes: It shall be unlawful to obstruct or park a vehicle in any fire lane, such fire lanes to be 
designated by the head of the Fire Department and posted as such. Said fire lanes to be a distance of 
twelve (12) feet from the curbing of a sidewalk in a shopping center, apartment complexes and similar 
locations. Where no sidewalk with curbing exists, the distance shall be twenty (20) feet from the front 
wall of the building, or any other distance that the Fire Chief determines necessary for public safety. 

C. Any object or vehicle obstructing or blocking any fire lane or private way, may be removed or towed by a 
towing service under the direction of a Police Officer at the expense of the owner of said vehicle or 
object and without liability to the Town of Wilmington. 

1. Towing and/or storage fees are not to exceed that which is provided in or as authorized by Statute 
Law. 

2. Any person called to tow a vehicle, may at his discretion, if the owner appears before the towing is 
complete, charge the owner one-half the usual fee for towing. 

D. The owner of record of any building affected by these sections shall provide and install signs and road 
markings as provided in Paragraph B of this section. Said signs shall be no less than 12" X 18" and shall 
read "Fire Lane - No Parking - Tow Zone." 

E. Any person violating any of the foregoing sections shall, for the first offense, be punished by a fine of 
up to Fifty ($50) dollars. Each day that such violation continues, shall constitute a separate offense. 



103 



ARTICLE 21 (continued) 



F. Exceptions: Certain delivery vehicles may park in a fire lane for a reasonable length of time, if the 
nature of their business prohibits or restricts the use of other access points of the building, also 
emergency vehicles may park in the fire lane while responding to calls for service; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by A.John Imbimbo: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Wilmington by adding under Chapter 5: The remainder of motion as in main motion, line for line. 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Planning Board recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously. 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington by adding a new 
section to the Wilmington Zoning By-Law as follows: 



III-7 USES IN PLANNED RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT - PRD DISTRICTS 

A. GENERAL OBJECTIVES 

The PRD district is intended to allow greater flexibility in land use planning for the development of 
tracts of land in terms of preservation of open spaces, utilization of natural features and provision 
of a variety of housing types and styles; to ensure that overall development plans will be presented 
to the Town Meeting in connection with any proposal to rezone a tract of land to PRD District; and to 
enable the Planning Board to require adherence to such overall development plans in the granting of a 
special permit which shall control all aspects of the proposed PRD as hereinafter discribed. 

B. TOWN MEETING PRESENTATION 

Every proposal presented to Town Meeting for rezoning land to a PRD District shall include an overall 
development plan which shall show in a general manner, drawn to scale, existing natural features in- 
cluding the limits of the Flood Plain District and Wetlands as determined and regulated in accordance 
with G.L.c.131 Sec. 40, "The Wetlands Protection Act," the proposed locations, types and floor plans 
for proposed buildings and other structures, proposed location of streets, drives, parking areas and 
other paved areas, the proposed grading of the site and the proposed open space. A copy of the over- 
all development plan, which shall be deemed to include any literature and comments, authorized by the 
developer which will be or has been presented to Town Meeting shall be filed with the Town Clerk 
together with the Article to rezone the subject site to PRD District. 

C. PRD STANDARDS 



1. Minimum Tract Size - a PRD shall be permitted upon a single tract, in one ownership with definitive 
boundaries ascertainable from a record deed and recorded plan, or new outline survey plan if required 
by the Planning Board, with an area of not less than 15 acres. Existing public or private ways need 
not constitute boundaries of the tract but area within any such way shall not be counted in determin- 
ing compliance with PRD standards. 

2. Permissible Density - The number of dwelling units permitted within any PRD shall not exceed three 
and one half units per acre exclusive of land situated in the Flood Plain District and exclusive of 
Wetlands as defined in G.L.c. 131 Sec. 40, "The Wetlands Protection Act." 

3. Permitted Uses - There shall be permitted in a PRD: 

a. Single-family detached and attached, and multi-unit structures of all types without regard to 
dwelling unit configuration or form of ownership. 

b. Accessory uses incidental to the principal residential uses indicated above. 

4. Lot Area, Frontage and Yard Requirements - There shall be no minimum lot area, frontage or yard 
requirements within a PRD. However no building shall be erected within 50 feet of a public way, 
private way, or boundary line of the overall PRD tract. 

5. Height - No building shall be more than two and one-half stories or 38 feet in height. 

6. Each unit shall be serviced by municipal water and municipal sewer. 

7. Design and Construction Requirements - To the degree determined applicable by the Planning Board 
all design and construction requirements shall comply with "Rules and Regulations Governing the Sub- 
division of Land in the Town of Wilmington." All private roads, driveways, parking areas and other 
PRD facilities shall be fully maintained and operated by all of the owners of the units. 

8. Area of Residential Development - The area developed for residential use, including buildings, 
parking and other areas paved for vehicular use, shall not exceed 30% of the total area of the PRD 
tract. Foot and bicycle paths and recreation facilities, including buildings wholly devoted to 
recreation, shall not be counted in calculating the 30% limitation. 



104 



9. Common Open Space 

a. All land within the PRD tract which is not covered by buildings, roads, driveways, parking areas or 
service areas or which is not set aside as private yards, patios or gardens for the residents, shall be 
Common Open Space. The area of the Common Open Space shall equal at least 40% of the total area of the 
tract. Such land shall have a shape dimension, character and location suitable to assure its use for 
park, recreation, conservation or agricultural purposes by at least all the residents of the PRD. 

A minimum of 257« of the non-Flood Plain or non-Wetlands area of the tract shall be included in the 
required Common Open Space. Each parcel of Common Open Space shall have adequate access for all 
residents of the PRD and no structure shall be constructed thereon in excess of 20 feet in height nor 
shall the maximum lot coverage including paved areas exceed 107, without Planning Board approval. 

b. Provisions shall be made so that the Common Open Space and other common property shall be owned in 
common by the owners of all units in the PRD, or by a corporation, non-profit organization or trust 
whose members are all the owners of the units. In all cases, a perpetual restriction of the type 
described in G.L.c. 184 Sec. 31 running to and enforceable by the Town shall be recorded in respect to 
the Common Open Space. Such restriction shall provide that the Common Open Space shall be retained in 
perpetuity for one or more of the following uses: conservation, open space, agriculture, recreation or 
park. Such restriction shall be in such form and substance as the Planning Board my prescribe and deem 
appropriate. 

c. In order to ensure that the corporation, non-profit organization or trust will properly maintain 
the Common Open Space and other common property an instrument (s) shall be recorded at the Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds which shall as a minimum provide: 

(1) A legal description of the Common Open Space. 

(2) A statement of the purposes for which the Common Open Space is intended to be used and the 
restrictions on its use and alienation. 

(3) The type and name of the corporation, non-profit organization, or trust which will own, manage 
and maintain the Common Open Space. 

(4) The ownership or beneficial interest in the corporation, non-profit organization or trust of 
each owner of a dwelling in the PRD development and a provision that such ownership or beneficial 
interest shall be appurtenant to the dwelling to which it relates and may not be conveyed or encumbered 
separately therefrom. 

(5) Provisions for the number, term of office, and the manner of election to office, removal from 
office and the filling of vacancies in the office of directors and/or officers of the corporation or 
non-profit organization or trustees of the trust. 

(6) Procedures for the conduct of the affairs and business of the corporation, non-profit organiza- 
tion or trust including provision for the calling and holding of meetings of members and directors and/ 
or officers of the corporation or non-profit organization or beneficiaries and trustees of the trust 
and provision for quorum and voting requirements for action to be taken. Each owner of a dwelling 
shall have voting rights proportional to his ownership or beneficial interest in the corporation, non- 
profit organization or trust. 

(7) Provision for the management, maintenance, operation, improvement and repair of the Common Open 
Space and facilities thereon, including provisions for obtaining and maintaining adequate insurance, 
and levying and collecting from the dwelling owners common charges to pay for expenses associated with 
Common Open Space, including real estate taxes. It shall be provided that common charges are to be 
allocated among the dwelling owners in proportion to their ownership or beneficial interests in the 
corporation, non-profit organization or trust, and that each dwelling owner's share of the common 
charge shall be a lien against his real estate in the PRD, which shall have priority over all other 
liens with the exception of municipal liens and first mortgages of record, and 

(8) The method by which such instrument or instruments may be amended. 

10. Limitation of Subdivision - No lot shown on a plan for which a PRD permit is granted may be further 
subdivided, and a notation to this effect shall be placed on the recorded lotting plan. 

11. Special Provisions for the Wilmington Housing Authority - Except as provided in Subsection 4. Lot Area 
Frontage and Yard Requirements, Subsection 5. Height and Subsection 6. Utilities, the limitations 
contained in Section C.PRD Standards shall not apply to a PRD which will be owned by the Wilmington 
Housing Authority, provided that upon Town Meeting approval of the rezoning the Planning Board finds 
that the proposed design is generally consistent with the purposes and objectives of this By-law. 

D. PROCEDURE FOR REZONING AND APPROVAL 

1. Town Meeting Submission and Rezoning 

a. Any person who submits a Warrant Article to rezone land to a PRD District shall comply with the 
provisions of Section B. Town Meeting Presentation and shall meet with the Planning Board and file 
eight sets of an overall development plan and supporting documents which shall be prepared by an inter- 
disciplinary development team comprised of a Registered Professional Engineer, Registered Land Surveyor 
Architect, Landscape Architect or similar professionals approved in writing by the Planning Board. 



105 



Article 22. (continued) 
b 



^ Z\ ?la T in A B0 ^i S n aU ' Withi " tCn d3yS ° f reCCipt ° f 3 »«bmi»Bion hereunder, refer the application 
to the Board of Health, Conservation Commission, Water and Sewer Commission, Police and Fire Departments 

r'u^ed 8 :uh r in n 35 B daJ s : n8 InSf>eCt ° r ^"^ -commendations IZ^SST^' 

c. Based upon this initial review the Planning Board may request such additional information as the Plan- 
^nn?? T d£ \ tennine 18 re ^°^bly necessary for Town Meeting consideration. It is recommended that 
the applicant continue to meet with the Planning Board to review the overall development plan and identify 
appropriate revisions and amendments to the overall submission. identity 
d Planning Board Town Meeting Report - The Planning Board shall report to Town Meeting- m if it HnH. 
that the PRD is in harmony with the general objectives, and intent of'the PRD Zction S tha the PRD 
contains a mix of residential, open spaces and other uses in a variety of buildings to be sufficient^ 
?o V tJ e a m«r- wn^'!! T 1 ^ " appro P riate to d epart from the requirements of this By-law Labi, 
to the District(s) in which the PRD tract is located; and (3) if sufficient data to give reasoned assur- 

to nC ?ow!; a Mee^ng eVelOP,nent ^ COnf0m t0 ™ pr ° vi8lon8 " *■ the applicant - 8 Station 

2. Procedure for Special Permit 

V t f lt T r?,? 7 T ° Wn Meeting of a PRD District, any person who desires a special permit to 
construct the PRD shall submit an application and eight copies of all plans in such form as Te Planning 
Board may require which shall include the following- rianning 

PRD tract Yw^S STATEMENT containing a petition, a list of parties in interest with respect to the 
PRD tract, a list of the development team, an overall evaluation of existing site features and a statement 

al noon T e V° nC T inC , 1Uding ^ t3bular and Pl3n f0 ™ the Size of <** '"•t, the area or wet ant 
and flood plain the number of units, type, size(number of bedrooms, floor area), ground coverage and area 
of residential development and common open space and a development schedule for' all site imprints 

Proposed instruments to be recorded with the plans including the Common Open Space 
(3 ZlCnment' 5 *?* T ^" hi ^ corporation, non-profit organization or trust instrument 
(3) Development plans bearing the seal of a Registered Professional Engineer, Registered Land 
Surveyor, Architect, Landscape Architect or similar professional as appropriate and consisting off 

. Site Plan and specifications showing all site improvements and meeting, to the exten aoolicable 
^requirements set forth for a Definitive Plan in the Subdivision Rules and Re^lat^ns of "he pTanntng ' 

1 foot;' SitC per8pectlve ' sections ' elevations !/ 8 ^ch equals 1 foot and typical floor plans 1/4 inch 

. Detail plans for disposal of sanitary sewage, solid waste and surface drainage- and 
. Detailed plans for landscaping. 

b. The Planning Board shall, within ten days of receipt of an application hereunder refer the 
Denary '? °' "f^' Conservation Commission, Water and Sewer Commissi" 'p"ice an"d Fire 
sha" be made Zu % T* BUllding In8pector for wri "en reports and recommendations and no decision 
recent of such rejortf reP ° rtS ° r 35 ^ eUpSed f ° U ^ 8uch -«« 

c. Planning Board Decision - A special permit which shall control all aspects of the proposed PRD 
shall be issued only if the Planning Board finds that the Plans submitted to it for a speed permit 
h C a™ m ^r^" 3 ; 17 t0 ° Vera11 devel °P— «= Pl« Panted to Town Meeting and "hat the PR^Ts in 
loT A LZ T ° b J eCtives and intent of this PRD section. If a special permit is granted? the banning 
Board may impose as a condition thereof that the installation of municipal services and construction of 

f th r r5lannIn K Board" mav ™ ^ ^ ^ ^ ° f ^ Subdivision Rules and R^LJions 

planned repeat i!n f fen ?m Sufficie ? t 8ecurit y to ensure ■»<* compliance and the completion of 

safetf L and Slte amenities ' and ma y ^Pose such additional safeguards as public 

manner.! convenience may require and by amending the Wilmington Zoning By-Law in the following 

1) By deleting in Section 1-2. A the words 

"A. For the purpose of this By-Law, the Town of Wilmington is hereby divided into the following 

districts ; 



1. Rural Districts (R) 

2. Single-Residence-A Districts (SRA) 

3. Single-Residence-B Districts (SRB) 

4. Neighborhood, Business Districts (NE) 

5. General Business Districts (GB) 

6. Industrial Districts (IND) 



106 



ARTICLE 22. (continued) 



7. High Density Traffic Business Districts (HDTB) 

8. Flood Plain Districts (W)" 
and by substituting in place thereof the words 

"A. For the purpose of this By-Law, the Town of Wilmington is hereby divided into the following 
districts: 



1. 


Rural Districts 


(R) 


2. 


Single-Residence-A Districts 


(SRA) 


3. 


Single-Residence-B Districts 


(SRB) 


4. 


Planned Residential Development Districts 


(PRD) 


5. 


Neighborhood Business Districts 


(NB) 


6. 


General Business Districts 


(GB) 


7. 


Industrial Districts 


(IND) 


8. 


High Density Traffic Business Districts 


(HDTB) 


9. 


Flood Plain Districts 


(W) 



2) By adding in Section II a new Section 18 as follows: 

"18. PLANNING BOARD. The Town of Wilmington Planning Board which for purposes of Chapter 40A shall 
be deemed the Special Permit Granting Authority on petitions for Planned Residential Development as 
set forth in Section 111-7." 

3) By adding in Section IV- 3A a new Section 12 as follows: 

"12. For a Planned Residential Development, two (2) spaces per dwelling unit." 

4) By adding in Section IV-3E, after the words "parking spaces" in the second line, the words, 
"except when such spaces are located in a Planned Residential Development," so that the amended 
provision would read as follows: 

"...a site plan for three or more parking spaces, except when such spaces are located in a Planned 
Residential Development, shall be submitted to the Town Engineer,..." 

5) By deleting in Section IV-4 after the words "a Single - Residence-A" in the sixth line, the word 
"or Single-Residence-B District" and substituting in place thereof the words, "Single - Residence-B 
District or Planned Residential Development District." so that the amended provision would read as 
follows: 

"...a Single - Residence-A District, a Single - Residence-B District or Planned Residential Develop- 
ment District." 

6) by deleting in Section V-l after the words "SCHEDULE OF REQUIREMENTS" the words "In any District" 
and substituting in place thereof the words "in the following Districts" so that the amended provi- 
sions would read as follows: 

"In the following Districts, no use of premises shall be authorized..." 

7) by adding in Section VIII-2B after the words "May be authorized by" in the fifteenth line, the 
words "The Planning Board for uses under Section III-7 and by" so that the amended provision would 
read as follows: 

"Application"for a Special Permit which may be authorized by the Planning Board for uses under 
Section III-7 and by the Board of Appeals for uses under Section Ill-IB..." 
and by adding to the end of Article 22, the following sub-section: 
E. INVALIDITY 

The invalidity of any section or any provision of the Planned Residential Development District shall 
not invalidate any o^her section or provision. 

Article 22, motion by John DeRoy: "I move that the Town accept Article 22, as printed in warrant word for 
word with the following amendment, we move to amend Article 22 by adding the following sentence to the end 
of paragraph l.a in Section III-7.D.l.a. Procedure for rezoning and approval: to be added after paragraph 
a. as indicated. . ."The applicant shall also file with the Conservation Commission for a determination of 
applicability, a Notice of Intent, and an outline of wetlands as defined in the Wetlands Protection Act, 
all in accordance with Mass. G.L. 131, Section 40, Subsection 3." and by adding to the end of paragraph l.b 
the following sentence: The Conservation Commission's report shall include a determination of applicabilit; 
and Order of Conditions and a verification of wetlands. Finance Committee recommends approval. Planning 
Board recommends approval. Article submitted by Planning Board. After much discussion this article as 
amended was voted upon. Standing vote was taken. Motion lost for want of 2/3rds majority. Yes 188 No 122 

After Article 22, Arthur Smith of the Water Commission asked that Article 16 be reconsidered. Motion lost. 
Yes 141 No 164. 



107 



ARTICLE 23 To see if the Town will vote to amend the Official Map and to discontinue as a Town way the 
layout of Heather Drive from 2.37 feet west of the Wilmington-North Reading Town Line to the Wilmington-North 
Reading Town Line under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 41 Section 81-F relating to changes to the 
Official Map and Chapter 82, as amended, relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontin^ 
uance of Public Ways and specific repairs thereon), which discontinuance is filed in the office of the Town 
Clerk and which with plans therein, is hereby referred to for a more particular description; and to deter- 
mine how an appropriation shall be raised whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds by 
r°M7i 8 ^° r ° the ™ i8e for the purpose of paying damages arising from said discontinuance; or do'anything i„ 
1 ( ?^ ? lnan "T Commi " ee "commends disapproval. Planning Board recommends disapproval. Motion 

and "Sh w V T 6 th3t WG PaSS ° Ver thiS 3rticle and take n ° action thereon." Motion seconded 
and so voted. Article passed over. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning by law and map of the Town of Wilmington by 
voting to rezone from Single Residence A District to General Business District the following described 

No'rtnerly by Lowell S^re^ 8 ' " " S ° Utherly ° f L ° WeU Street and Wnded 38 follow8 = 

Westerly by West Street 

Southerly by existing industrial district, 

and Easterly by Route 93: or do anything in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Planning Board recommends disapproval. Motion by Sterling C 
Article P aLed V ove^ at Pa8S ° W * Tticle and take no action thereon." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 25 To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of enlarg- 
ing the surface water drainage culverts at Federal Street and Woburn Street; or do anything in relation 
thereto Finance Committee recommends approval of $30,000. Planning Board recommends approval. Motion by 
Robert Cain: I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $82,000 for the purpose of 
enlarging the surface water drainage culverts at Federal St. and Woburn St." Motion seconded and after much 
discussion the motion of $82,000 was voted by standing vote. Motion so voted. Yes 223 No 35. 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vot 
certain parcel of town-owned land shown 

Northerly by Pinewood Road v 

Easterly by lot 21 

Southerly by lot 10 

Westerly by lots 16-18 
being lot 20 Block D containing 30,000 s 
Wilmington, Mass., owned & developed by 
Brown, Civil Engineer, Carlisle, Mass." 
and further to set the minimum amount to 
Finance Committee recommends approval, 
sale of town-owned land as described in 
$11,000. Motion seconded and so voted. 



e to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Leo W. Campbell a 
as Parcel 60 on Assessors' Map 81, bound and described as follows- 
100 feet 
300 feet 
100 feet 
300 feet 

quare feet, all as shown on plan entitled: "Wilmington Acres, North 
John D. Cooke, December 1946, Scale 1 in. to 100 ft., Merrill A. 
subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, 
be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 
Motion by Leo W. Campbell: "I move that the Town authorize the 
article 26 with the minimum amount set by the Selectmen to be 



At this point in the meeting Sterling C. Morris made a motion about the tax cap. Motion: "I move that the 

Town yote to approve the Fiscal 1981 Budget, tax appropriation, use of available funds, and tax levy, except 

the Fiscal 1981 Budget of the School Committee, and to exceed the tax cap limits as provided for uSer 

"I;;"" 8 Gene " 1 \™»> ^apter ISl of the Acts of 19? 9 so that the Town's Fiscal 1981 Budget, or tax 

1981 Budc^r "'m°m 6V Y5' 11 J be exceeded ^ the 8um of $408,077 « necessary to meet the approved Fiscal 
iy»i Budget. Motion seconded and so voted. Yes 218 No 11. 

tSSSi! II' ?° S e ? lf l°T ^ U V ° te t0 auth °rize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Wayne Crawford a 
certain parcel of town-owned land bounded and described as follows: 
Northerly by Garden Ave. ioo feet 

Easterly by St. Paul St. 130 feet 

Southerly by Lot 64 (Silver Lake 100 feet 

Gardens Plan) , 
Westerly by Lots 32, 33, 34, 35 (Silver Lake 130 feet 
Gardens Plan) 

Sf n S I 3 ' 000 SqU t T ? fe f C and being lots 65,66,67, and 68 as shown on a plan entitled "Silver Lake Gardens 
vivor » ffiy&'JTSLS th Y- W ' Wllbur Co.,Inc.Aug.l918,Scale 80 ft.equals 1 in. ,Chas . J .Elliot ,Engr . * Sur- 
veyor. Said lot is shown on Assessors Map 54 Parcel 25; or do anything in relation thereto. 



108 



ARTICLE 27. (continued) 



Motion by Wayne E. Crawford: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the sale of town-owned land as described 
in Article 27 with the minimum amount set by the Selectmen to be $9,000. Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to John J. Gearty a 
certain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 22 on Assessors' Map 84, bound and described as follows: 

Westerly by Royal Street 185 feet 

(formerly High Street) 

Northerly by Idlewild Road 195 feet 

Southeasterly by Oak Street 220 feet 

Southerly by a curve of 15 feet radius 45 feet 

being lots 893-901 inclusive, containing 20,795 square feet, all as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Pine 
Plains in Wilmington, Mass., Scale 80 ft. equals 1 in., June 1909, owned by the Boston Lowell Realty Co., Old 
South Bldg. , Boston, John S. Crossman, C.E., 667 Tremont St., Boston" subject to such terms and conditions as 
the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do any- 
thing in relation thereto. Motion by John Gearty: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the sale of town- 
owned land as described in Article 28 with the minimum amount of $11,000. Finance Committee recommends 
approval. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Theresa A. and 
William R. Harrison a certain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 189 on Assessors' Map 40, bound and 
described as follows: 

Easterly by Adams Street (Young Street) 350 feet 

by a straight and an irregular line 

Southerly by lot 15 100 feet 

Westerly by 41/101-105 350 feet 

Northerly by lot 22 85 feet-+ 

being lots 1-14, containing 34,500 square feet, more or less, substantially as shown on a plan entitled "Plan 
of France B. Hiller, Recorded with Middlesex No. Dist. Deeds, Book of Plans 3c, Plan 141, M.C. Mengis Plan, 
Book of Plans 3A, Plan 42" subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further 
to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. Motion by 
James Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Theresa A. and 
William R. Harrison a certain parcel of town-owned land as described in Article 29 with an amended sale price 
of $8,500." Motion by Robert Cain: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey 
to Theresa A. and William R. Harrison a certain parcel of town-owned land as described in Article 29 with 
the amount of $11,000 being the amount set by the Selectmen." Mr. Cain's motion voted on as it is the 
larger amount. Motion seconded and so voted. Finance Committee recommends approval. Standing vote taken, 
Yes 132 No 62. 

The Finance Committee wanted to go on record as recommending that these parcels of land in the future be sold 
at public auction. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Ervyl H. Stewart 
and Ann P. Stewart a certain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 32 on Assessors' Map 54 bound and 
described as follows: 

Southerly by Garden Avenue 200 feet 

Westerly by St. Paul Street 100 feet 

Northerly by lots 535 and 502 200 feet 

Easterly by Rhodes Street 100 feet 

being an unnumbered lot containing 20,000 square feet, all as shown on a plan entitled "Silver Lake Gardens 
Annex No. 1, Wilmington, Mass., owned by J.W. Wilbur Co., Inc., December 2, 1918, Scale 80 ft. equals 1 in., 
A.L. Eliot C.E.", subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the 
minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion by Ervyl H. Stewart: "I request that Article 30 be withdrawn." Motion seconded 
and so voted to withdraw. 



109 



ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Mr. and Mrs. Denni 
Sullivan a certain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 15 on Assessors' Map 19, bound and described as 

follows : 

Northerly by Aldrich Road 130 feet 

Westerly by Mozart Avenue 160 feet 

Southerly by lot 420 66.6 feet 

Easterly by an unnumbered lot- 5.00 feet 

Land Court Case No. 22877 (formerly lots 89-91) 106.00 feet 
being lots 83-88 inclusive, containing 12,361 square feet, all as shown on a plan entitled "Home Park, Plan 
No. 3, Wilmington, Mass., owned by J.W. Wilbur, Scale 60 ft. Equals 1 in., Jan. 1, 1903" reserving unto them-' 
selves and the Town of Wilmington for roadway and roadway sloping purposes the following described area: 



130 feet 
64 feet 
51 feet 



78 feet 
20 feet 



Northerly by Aldrich Road 
Westerly by Mozart Avenue 
Southeasterly by a curve of 25 feet radius 

through lots 84 and 85 
Southerly through lots 85-88 
Easterly by an unnumbered lot- 

Land Court Case No. 22877 
(formerly lots 89-91) 

containing 2,900 square feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and furthe 
to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. Motion by A. 
John Imbimbo: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Mr. and Mrs. Denni 
Sullivan a certain parcel of town-owned land as described in Article 31 with a minimum amount to be paid for 
such conveyance of $10,000." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted. 



ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote the following petition: "All job- openings as a town employee of 
Wilmington will be given to the most qualified resident (minimum 6 months living in the Town of Wilmington), 
meaning Wilmington residents will have first preference on job openings; where there are no applications from 
Town residents then the most qualified non-resident will be hired." Motion by Frances Dec: "I would like to 
amend Article 32 as printed in the warrant to insert the word qualified before the word town, line four so 
that line four and five will read: Where there are no applications from qualified town residents, then the 
most qualified non-resident will be hired." Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Motion seconded. 
Motion lost, unanimously. 

With no further motions to come before the meeting the Moderator asked that a motion be made to adjourn. 
Walter Kaminski quoted an estimated figure for the tax rate of $80.66. Motion to adjourn seconded and voted, 
and meeting adjourned at 11:48 P.M. 

There were in attendance at the afternoon session 733 and 392 at the evening session. 



ARTICLES BY TAXATION 
REVENUE SHARING 
TRANSFER 
BOND ISSUE 



$15,653,972. 
600,000. 
982,317. 
0. 



Priscilla R.W. Lynch 
Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 



110 



WARRANT SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - JUNE 9, 1980 



TO: EITHER OF THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed by the Revised By- 
Laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote 
in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Barrows Auditorium in the High School, in said Town of Wilmington, 
on Monday, the 9th day of June A.D. 1980 at 7:30 p.m., then and there to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend the vote adopted under Article 12 of the Special Town 
Meeting held on June 23, 1975, so as to provide that State and Federal aid received as a contribution toward 
the cost of the project for constructing sewers, sewerage systems and sewage treatment and disposal facilities 
shall be applied to the cost of such project (the present estimated cost of which is $10,600,000.) in 
addition to the sums appropriated and authorized to be borrowed pursuant to the vote under said Article 12, or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the sewer construction project for the Town of Wilmington 
and called "The Silver Lake Interceptor" by deleting Contract No. 6 in its entirety and the costs relative 
thereto for a total of 11,900 linear feet, more or less; or do anything else in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate funds by transfer for the purpose of providing a sum 
of money for the Conservation Commission, Personal Services Account; or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town of Wilmington will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws and Zoning Map of the Town 
of Wilmington by voting to rezone from Single Residence A district to High Density Traffic Business District 
the following described area bound: 

Westerly by the 1978 layout of West Street 53.61 feet, 63.06 feet, 97.12 feet, 10.00 feet and by the 
1969 layout of West Street 190 - feet, 90 t f eet an d 25 - feet. Southerly by the existing Industrial District 
420 - feet. Easterly, Northeasterly, and Northeasterly by Route 93, 240± feet, 180.28 feet, 387.81 feet and 
18.53 feet; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of the Warrant or a certified copy thereof, with your doings thereon to 
the Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

Given under our hands and seal of said Town this twelfth day of May A.D., One thousand nine hundred and eighty. 

Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington 

s /Robert J. Cain, Chairman 

8/Rocco V. DePasquale 

s/Daniel H. Ballou, Jr. 

s/Aldo Caira 

8 /A. John Imbimbo 

Attest: 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - JUNE 9, 1980 - BARROWS AUDITORIUM 



On June 9, 1980 at 7:30 P.M. in the Barrows Auditorium, Mr. John Callan, Town Moderator and Mr. Alan Altman, 
Town Counsel, because of the large group in attendance moved the Special Town Meeting to the Gymnasium in the 
High, as prescribed by the Revised By-laws of said town. The meeting to commence at 8:00 P.M. At 8:04 P.M. 
the meeting was called to order with 627 people in attendance. The Moderator requested the Town Clerk to 
record the fact that all was in order as advertised and posted. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend the vote adopted under Article 12 of the Special Town Meet- 
ing held on June 23, 1975, so as to provide that State and Federal aid received as a contribution toward the 
cost of the project for constructing sewers, sewerage systems and sewage treatment and disposal facilities 
shall be applied to the cost of such project (the present estimated cost of which is $10,600,000.) in 
addition to the sums appropriated and authorized to be borrowed pursuant to the vote under said Articl 12, or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

Ill 



(Special Town Meeting continued) 

Motion by George Allan of the Water & Sewer Commissioners: "I move ;Ehat the vote adopted under Article 12 of 
the warrant for the Special Town Meeting held on June 23, 1975 be and hereby is amended so that said vote shall 
provide that any State and Federal aid received as a contribution toward the cost of the sewer project describ- 
ed therein shall be applied to the cost of such project (the present estimated cost of which is $10,600,000) 
in addition to the sums appropriated and authorized to be borrowed under said Article 12. 

Motion by James Carroll, 10 Gowing Road: "I move to amend the motion on Article 1 by changing the period at 
the end to a semicolon and adding the following words; "and also so as to provide that the part of the sewer 
from Salem Street to Ballardvale Street, being a portion of Contract 6 containing 11,900 linear feet more or 
less, and the cost relative thereto, be deleted from the sewer construction project for the Town of Wilmington. 
The amendment was seconded by Daniel Gillis. The Finance Committee and Planning Board both approved the main 
motion, however Mr. Kaminski stated that the Finance Committee was not in favor of the amended motion. After 
much discussion a motion was made to close debate on the Article. Motion to close debate so voted. Yes 583 
and No 18. After this vote the Moderator recognized Mr. Allan, Mr. Carroll and Mrs. Sullivan for the purpose 
of summarizing. The vote to amend the main article was Yes 99 and No 581. Amendment lost. The vote on the 
main Article 1 was then voted Yes 631 and No 51. Article 1 so voted. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the sewer construction project for the Town of Wilmington 
and called "The Silver Lake Interceptor" by deleting Contract No. 6 in its entirety and the costs relative 
thereto for a total of 11,900 linear feet, more or less; or do anything else in relation thereto. After the 
discussion of Article 1 and its vote, Mr. Gillis made a motion to pass over this article. The motion was 
seconded and so voted. Article passed over. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate funds by transfer for the purpose of providing a sum 
of money for the Conservation Commission, Personal Services Account; or do anything in relation thereto. 
Motion by Robert Cain: "I move that the Town vote to transfer from the 1979-80 Budget, Snow and Ice Control 
Account #325, the sum of $900 to the Conservation Commission Personal Services Account #942." This motion was 
seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town of Wilmington will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws and Zoning Map of the Town 
of Wilmington by voting to rezone from single Residence A district to High Density Traffic Business District 
the following described area bound: 

Westerly by the 1978 layout of West Street: 53.61 fee^t, 63.06 feet, 97.12 feet, 10.00 feet 
and by the 1969 layout of West Street; 190* feet, 90- feet and 25- feet. Southerly by the 
existing Industrial District, 420- feet. 

Easterly, Northeasterly, and Northeasterly by Route 93, 240- feet, 180.28 feet, 387.81 feet 
and 18.53 feet; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Attorney Simon Cutter read the following motion: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-law and 
Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from Single Residence A District to High Density 
Traffic Business District by the following described area, as described in the main article. After much 
discussion the motion was made to vote on the article. Planning Board recommended approval and the Finance 
Committee disapproved. Motion voted Yes 175 and No 286. Motion was defeated. 

Mr. Morris moved that the meeting be adjourned. Motion seconded and so voted. Moderator declared the meet- 
ing adjourned at 10:12 P.M. There were 793 voters in attendance. 



Priscilla R. W. Lynch 
Town Clerk 

Attest: Wilmington, Massachusetts 



112 



WARRANT - STATE PRIMARY - SEPTEMBER 16, 1980 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of the 
said Town who are qualified to vote in the Primaries to meet in the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, 
Tuesday, the sixteenth day of September 1980 at ten o'clock a.m. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the Election of Candidates of Political Parties for the 
following offices: Representative in Congress for the Fifth Congressional District; Councillor for the 
Fifth Councillor District; Senator in General Court for the First Essex & Middlesex District; Representative 
in the General Court forTwentieth Middlesex District; Representative in the General Court for Twenty-first 
Middlesex District; County Commissioners (Two) for Middlesex County; Sheriff for Middlesex County. 

The polls will be open from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said meet- 
ing. 

Given under our hands this 11th day of August A.D. 1980. 

Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington 
s/Robert J. Cain, Chairman 
s/A. John Imbimbo 
s/Rocco V. DePasquale 
s/Aldo A. Caira 

Attest: s/Daniel H. Ballou, Jr. 



STATE PRIMARY - WILMINGTON MASSACHUSETTS 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM. CHURCH STREET - SEPTEMBER 16, 1980 

At 9:45 a.m. on September 16, 1980 the Town Clerk read the Warrant. All the machines in the six (6) precincts 
were open and ready for the election. All 25 zero sheets were removed from the machines and placed outside 
the rail for all candidates to see. The following votes show the votes from all 25 machines and the 36 absent- 
ee ballots cast. All were recorded and declaration thereof made, as by the law directed, and were for the 
following, namely: 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY (cont.) 



Representative in Congress - 5th Middlesex District 



James M. 
Robert F. 
Blanks 



Shannon 
Ha tern 



Representative - General Court - 20th Middlesex 



James R, 
Blanks 



Miceli 



1728 
258 
1986 



Councillor - 5th District 
John F. Markey 
Robert P. O'Meara 
Blanks 



Senator - General Court - 1st Essex & Middlesex 



Robert J. Cain 
William J. Gustus 
Regina McDonough Villa 
Blanks 



Representative - General Court - 21st Middlesex 
Michael J. Barrett 216 
Blanks 88 

304 

County Commissioner - Vote for Two - Middlesex 
Michael E. McLaughlin 
S. Lester Ralph 
Thomas J . Larkin 
Blanks 



Sheriff - Middlesex 
James A. Breslin 
Charles Leo Buckley 
Joseph Michael Caterina 
Vincent Paul Ciampa 



83 
233 

51 
273 



113 



State Primary (cont.) 

DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Sheriff - Middlesex 
Thomas A. Corkery 
Edward F. Henneberry, Jr. 
Michael A. McLaughlin 
Vincent F. Zabbo 
Blanks 

Total Democratic votes cast 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



556 
356 
390 
124 
224 
2290 

2290 



Representative in Congress - 5th Middlesex Distri 



William C. Sawyer 
Blanks 



179 
25 



204 



Councillor - 5th District 
No Contest 

Senator - General Court - 1st Essex & Middlesex 
Robert C. Buell 169 

Blanks 35 

204 



Representative in Congress - 20th District 
No Contest 

Representative in Congress - 21st District 

Michael J. Crowley 

Blanks 



County Commissioner - Middlesex 
No Contest 

Sheriff - Middlesex 
Philip T. Razook 
Blanks 



Total Republican votes cast 



170 



29 
175 
204 



204 



172 
32 
204 

204 



The Board of Registrars were present and as voters left the polls they were allowed to change party if so 
desired. 

After the declaration of the vote the totals were read aloud and the school was vacated. At the reading of 
the ballot William Gustus was given a count of 1145. The Town Clerk found an error in her checking Wednesday 
morning and corrected it to 1085. After the declaration of the vote the meeting adjourned at 9:35 p.m. 



Priscilla R. W. Lynch 
Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 

Attest: 



114 



WARRANT SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - SEPTEMBER 22, 1980 
TO: EITHER OF THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed by the Revised By- 
Laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in 
Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Barrows Auditorium in the High School, in said Town of Wilmington, on 
Monday, the 22nd day of September A.D. 1980 at 7:30 p.m., then and there to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Totm will vote to ratify and confirm all action taken and votes adopted at the 
Special Town Meeting held on September 24, 1979, and at the Special Town Meeting held on June 9, 1980, or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to abandon the Town's right, title and 
interest in all or any part of the following easements, and authorize the Selectmen to convey to the Wilmington 
Redevelopment Authority the Town's interest in the hereinafter mentioned parcels upon such terms and conditions 
as the Selectmen shall deem appropriate and to set the minimum amount required for said conveyance: 

1. An easement for utilities granted to the Town by the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority in Book 2266, 
Page 129 and an easement for roadway purposes granted to the Town by the Wilmington Redevelopment 
Authority in Book 2266, Page 135 described beginning at a point, said point being southerly and distant 
885.68 feet from the southerly terminous of a curve of 640.00 feet radius at Eames Street, thence bearing 
to the left with a curve of 82.26 feet radius distant 89.55 feet to a point compound curvature, thence 
bearing to the right with a curve of 71.13 feet radius distant 193 feet more or less to a point, thence 
bearing to the right with a curve of 82.26 feet radius distant 10 feet more or less to a point of 
tangency, thence N14° 48' 27" W distant 195.00 feet to the point of beginning, all as shown on a plan 
entitled "Plan of Easements, Jewell Industrial Park, Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1"=100', July 11, 1980, 
K.J. Miller Co., Inc.", a copy of which is on file in the office of the Town Clerk; 

2. An easement for utilities granted to the Town by the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority in Book 2266, 
Page 129 described beginning at the northwesterly corner of Lot 9, thence N75° 11 '33" E distant 218.39 
feet to a point, thence S 14° 48'27"E distant 30.0 feet to a point, thence S75° 11'33"W distant 225.03 
feet to a point, thence bearing to the left with a curve of 71.13 feet radius distant 30.97 feet to a 
point of beginning, all as shown on said plan; 

3. An easement for utilities on the westerly edge of Lot 9 and northerly edge of other land of the 
Wilmington Redevelopment Authority granted to the Town by the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority in Book 
2266, Page 151, all as shown on said plan; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant or a certified copy thereof, with your doings thereon to 
the Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

Given under our hands and seal of said Town this twenty-fifth day of August A.D. 1980. 

Selectmen of Town of Wilmington 
s/Robert J. Cain 
s/A. John Imbimbo 

Attest: s/Daniel H. Ballou, Jr. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - SEPTEMBER 22, 1980 - BARROWS AUDITORIUM 

On September 22, 1980 at 7:30 p.m. in the Barrows Auditorium, Mr. John Callan, Town Moderator called the 
meeting to order there being a quorum present. All notices and posting were done in accordance with the law. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to ratify and confirm all action taken and votes adopted at the 
Special Town Meeting held on September 24, 1979, and at the Special Town Meeting held on June 9, 1980, or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain: "I move that all action taken and votes adopted at the Special Town Meeting held 
on September 24, 1979 and at the Special Town Meeting held on June 9, 1980 is hereby ratified and confirmed." 
Motion was seconded. At this point Mr. Morris spoke about Bond Counsels' suggestion to revote and confirm 
these meetings to keep our high standards affecting Bonding. There was very little discussion and the vote 

115 



(Special Town Meeting continued) 



was taken. The Moderator called for a two-thirds vote on this article. Vote was unanimous. Yes 213 No 6. 
Motion passed. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to abandon the Town's right, title and 
interest in all or any part of the following easements, and authorize the Selectmen to convey to the 
Wilmington Redevelopment Authority the Town's interest in the hereinafter mentioned parcels upon such terms 
and conditions as the Selectmen shall deem appropriate and to set the minimum amount required for said convey 
ance: 

1. An easement for utilities granted to the Town by the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority in Book 2266 
Page 129 and an easement for roadway purposes granted to the Town by the Wilmington Redevelopment 
Authority in Book 2266, Page 135 described beginning at a point, said point being southerly and distant 
885.68 feet from the southerly terminous of a curve of 640.00 feet radius at Eames Street, thence bear- 
ing to the left with a curve of 82.26 feet radius distant 89.55 feet to a point compound curvature, 
thence bearing to the right with a curve of 71.13 feet radius distant, 193 feet more or less to a point, 
thence bearing to the right with a curve of 82.26 feet radius distant 10 feet more or less to a point of 
tangency, thence N14° 48 '27" W distant 195.00 feet to the point of beginning, all as shown on a plan 
entitled "Plan of Easements, Jewell Industrial Park, Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1"»100*, July 11, 1980, 
K.J. Miller Co., Inc.", a copy of which is on file in the office of the Town Clerk; 

2. An easement for utilities granted to the Town by the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority in Book 2266 
Page 129 described beginning at the northwesterly corner of Lot 9, thence N75° 11 '33" E distant 218.39 
feet to a point, thence S14° 48'27"E distant 30.0 feet to a point, thence S75° 11'33"W distant 225.03 
feet to a point thence bearing to the left with a curve of 71.13 feet radius distant 30.97 feet to a 
point of beginning, all as shown on said plan; 

3. An easement for utilities on the westerly edge of Lot 9 and northerly edge of other land of the 
Wilmington Redevelopment Authority granted to the Town by the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority in 
Book 2266, Page 151, all as shown on said plan; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Raymond McNamara, Redevelopment Chairman read Article 2, same as above. Motion seconded. After 
very little discussion vote was taken. Motion passsed. Yes 155 and No 53. 

Moderator declared meeting adjourned at 8:00 P.M. There were 255 voters in attendance. 



Priscilla R. W. Lynch 
Town Clerk 

Attest: Wilmington, Massachusetts 



STATE ELECTION - WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
NOVEMBER 4, 1980 



TO EITHER OF THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said town who are qualified to vote in elections to vote at: 

WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM for PRECINCTS 1, 2, 3, 4. 

NORTH INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL GYMNASIUM FOR PRECINCTS 5 & 6. 

ON 

TUESDAY, THE FOURTH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 1980 FROM 6:00 A.M. TO 8:00 P.M. 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the election of candidates for the following offices: 
Electors of President and Vice President; Representative in Congress, 5th Congressional District; Councillor, 
5th Councillor District; Senator in General Court, 1st Essex & Middlesex Senatorial District; Representative 
in General Court; Precincts 1-2-4-5-6, 20th Representative District; Precinct 3, 21st Representative District 
Two (2) County Commissioners; Middlesex County; Sheriff, Middlesex County and (8) ballot questions. 



116 



(State Election continued) 



To vote for the adoption of the following questions: 

1. Proposed amendment to the Constitution. 

2. Law proposed by initiative petition. 

3. Law proposed by initiative petition. 

4. Referendum on an existing law. 

5. Proposed amendment to the Constitution. 

6. Proposed amendment to the Constitution. 

7. Town of Wilmington, license granting question. 

8. Non-Binding question, hydro-electric and Solar power. 

Hereon fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 



Given under our hands this 14th day of October, A.D. 1980. 



s /Robert J. Cain, Chairman 
s/Rocco V. DePasquale 
s/A. John Imbimbo 
s/Daniel H. Ballou, Jr. 
s/Aldo A. Caira 

Attest: Selectmen of Town of Wilmington 



At 5:45 A.M. on November 4, 1980 the polls were being prepared at the High School Gymnasium and the North 
Intermediate Gymnasium for the State election in order to open at 6:00 A.M. At 6:00 A.M. Mrs. Scanlon, 
Assistant Town Clerk opened the polls at the High School and Mrs. Lynch, Town Clerk opened the polls at the 
North Intermediate School. The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. with about 50 to 75 voters yet to vote. All 
voting was completed about 8; 30 P.M. 

There were 8,096 ballots cast. 238 were absentee ballots and 1 short ballot for President. 

All of the totals from the twenty- five (25) machines plus the absentee ballots were recorded and declaration 
thereof made, as by law is directed and were for the following: 



ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT VOTE 

Anderson and Lucy - The Anderson Coalition 1160 

Carter and Mondale - Democratic 3068 

Clark and Koch - Libertarian Party 67 

Deberry and Zimmerman - Socialist Workers Party 5 

Reagan and Bush - Republican 3717 

Others 

Blanks 80 

8097 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS - Fifth District 

James M. Shannon - Democratic 5136 
William C. Sawyer - Republican 1998 
Others 
Blanks 962 

8096 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT - First Essex & Middlesex 

Robert C. Buell - Republican 1645 
William J. Gustus - Democratic 5735 
Others 
Blanks 716 

8096 



117 



(State Election continued) 



COUNCILLOR - Fifth District 

John F. Markey - Democratic 5635 
Others 
Blanks 2461 

8096 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT - Twentieth Middlesex (Prec. 1,2 4,5,6) 

James R. Miceli - Democratic 5737 
Others 1 
Blanks 1115 

6853 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT - Twenty- first Middlesex (Prec. 3) 

Michael J. Barrett - Democratic 611 
Michael J. Crowley - Republican 379 
Others 
Blanks 253 

1243 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER - Middlesex 

Michael E. McLaughlin - Democratic 4447 
Thomas J. Larkin - Democratic 2735 
Others 
Blanks 914 

8096 



SHERIFF - MIDDLESEX 

Edward F. Henneberry, Jr. - Democratic 4498 
Philip T. Razook - Republican 1835 
Others 
Blanks 1763 

8096 



Question #1 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below, 
which was approved by the General Court in joint sessions of the House of Representatives and 
the Senate on September 7, 1977, by a vote of 262-1, and on May 28, 1980, by a vote of 192-0? 

Summary 

The proposed amendment would add a new article to the state Constitution which would prohibit 
discrimination against handicapped people. It would provide that no otherwise qualified hand- 
icapped individual could, on the sole basis of that handicap, be excluded from participation 
in, denied the benefits of, or subjected to discrimination in any program or activity. 



Yes 4541 
No 2709 
Blanks 846 

8096 



Question #2 - Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was disapproved by the House of Repre- 
sentatives on May 6, 1980, by a vote of 5-146, and on which no vote was taken by the Senate 
before May 7, 1980? 

Summary 

The proposed law would limit certain taxes, and change laws relating to school budgets and 
compulsory binding arbitration. It would impose a limit on state and local taxes on real estate 
and personal property equal to 2%% of the full and fair cash value of the property being taxed. 
If a locality currently imposes a tax greater than 2^% of that cash value, the tax would have to 
be decreased by 15% each year until the 2%7o level is reached. If a locality currently imposes a 
tax of less than 2%%, it would not be allowed to increase the tax rate. In either situation, a 



118 



(State Election continued) 



a city or town could raise its limit by a 2/3 local vote at a general election. 

The proposed law would provide that the total taxes on real estate and personal property imposed 
by the state or by localities could never be increased by more than 2%% of the total taxes imposed 
for the preceding year, unless two thirds of the voters agreed to the increase at a general election. 

It would further provide that no law or regulation which imposes additional costs on a city or town, 
or a law granting or increasing tax exemptions, would be effective unless the state agrees to assume 
the added cost. A division of the State Auditor's Department would determine the financial effect of 
laws and regulations on the various localities. 

The proposal would limit the amount of money required to be appropriated for public schools to that 
amount voted upon by the local appropriating authority. It would also repeal the law which provides 
for compulsory binding arbitration when labor negotiations concerning police and fire personnel come 
to an impasse. In addition, the petition would provide that no county, district, or authority could 
impose any annual increase in costs on a locality of greater than 47=, of the total of the year before. 

The proposed law would also reduce the maximum excise tax rate on motor vehicles from $66 per 
thousand to $25 per thousand, and it would allow a state income tax deduction equal to one half of 
the rent paid for the taxpayer's principal place of residence. 



Yes 
No 

Blanks 



4902 
2841 
353 
8096 



Question #3 - Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was disapproved by the House of Repre- 
sentatives on May 6, 1980, by a vote of 2-147, and on which no vote was taken by the Senate before 
May 7, 1980? 



Summary 

The proposed law would limit local property taxes and state taxes and would provide for increased 
state aid for local educational purposes. 

The act would limit local property taxes in the years 1981 through 1984 to the amount levied in 
the previous year increased by the percentage increase in personal income of the residents of the 
Commonwealth during the previous year. The local property tax limit could be exceeded to offset 
decreases in local aid, to cover shortages for prior years and to pay court judgments. Pension 
and retirement allowances, payments to other governmental units, principal and interest on any 
indebtedness, unemployment compensation, amounts required to be raised as a condition of a state 
or federal grant, and costs for special education programs would be excluded from the property tax 
limit. 

These local limits would be reduced by any excess taxes actually collected over the tax limit for 
the preceding year. The limit would not apply to any municipality having a general tax rate of less 
than $35 per thousand of equalized valuation. The tax limit could be exceeded by a two-thirds vote 
of the local appropriating body. 

The cost of regional and independent vocational schools would be subject to the same limitations. 

The proposed law would also limit state taxes imposed in the years 1981 through 1984 to an amount 
no greater than that imposed the previous year, increased by the percentage increase in the personal 
income of Massachusetts residents in the previous year. This state tax limit could be exceeded only 
to increase local aid or to assume other costs approved by a two-thirds vote of the state legislature. 
The amounts necessary to pay principal and interest on state indebtedness, pensions, retirement allow- 
ances, unemployment compensation, and court judgments, and money required to be raised as a condition 
of a federal grant would not be subject to the state tax limit. The total amount of local aid for any 
year which would be subject to legislative appropriation could not be less than the total amount of 
aid for the preceding year increased by half the increase in collected state taxes during that preced- 
ing year. The state tax limit would be reduced by any excess taxes actually collected over the tax 
limit for the preceding year. 

The proposed law also would require, subject to legislative appropriation, a gradual increase in the 
percentage of local educational costs paid by the Commonwealth to a level of 50% in 1984. The proposal 
would also require, again subject to legislative appropriation, that school aid paid by the Common- 
wealth in any year between 1981 through 1984 must be at least 15% greater than that provided in 1980. 

Yes 2472 
No 4600 
Blanks 1024 

BU95 



119 



(State Election continued) 



Question #4 - Referendum on an Existing Law 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was approved by the House of Repre- 
on November 1, 1979, by a vote of 83-62, and which was approved by the Senate on November 1, 
1979? 



Summary 

The law provides for increases in the salaries of members of the legislature and the constitu- 
tional officers of the Commonwealth. 

The law increases salaries of members of the legislature by an annual amount varying from 
$1,853 to $17,923. The size of the raise conferred on a particular individual depends upon 
his position within the legislature. The law has the effect of setting the base salary for 
a legislator at $20,335, but under the law legislative salaries range as high as the approxi- 
mately $55,920 paid to the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Represen- 
tatives . 

The salaries of the constitutional officers are increased either by $20,000, in the case of 
the Governor, or $10,000 in all other cases. The law raises the annual salary of the Governor 
to $60,000, that of the Attorney General to $47,500, and the salaries of the Lieutenant Gover- 
nor, Secretary of the Commonwealth, Treasurer and Receiver General, and the Auditor to $40,000. 

The law also amends the statutes pertaining to the organization of the offices of the Secre- 
taries of Administration and Finance and of Human Services and to the compensation of senior 
officials within those offices. It gives the Secretaries of Administration and Finance and of 
Human Services greater flexibility in establishing positions and setting salaries for those 
under their supervision. 



Yes 645 
No 6682 
Blanks 769 

8096 



Question #5 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below, 
which was approved by the General Court in joint sessions of the House of Representatives and 
the Senate on November 30, 1977, by a vote 257-8, and on September 18, 1980, by a vote of 
179-6? 



Summary 

The proposed amendment would limit the power of the legislature to impose certain costs on cities 
and towns. It would provide that any law which imposes additional costs upon two or more cities 
or towns by regulating the compensation, hours, status, conditions, or benefits of municipal 
employment would not be effective within a municipality until it accepts the law by vote or 
appropriation of money. Local acceptance would not be required if the legislature either passed 
the law by a two-thirds vote, or provided, during the same session in which the law was enacted, 
that the additional costs would be assumed by the Commonwealth. 



Yes 4458 
No 2477 
Blanks 1161 

8096 



Question #6 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below, 
which was approved by the General Court in joint sessions of the House of Representatives and 
the Senate on September 7, 1977, by a vote of 264-0, and on September 19, 1980, by a vote of 
162-0? 



Summary 

The proposed amendment would change the procedure by which the Legislature declares a measure to 
be an emergency law, making it effective when it is signed by the Governor. The amendment would 
allow the Legislature to make such a declaration by a voice vote, rather than by a recorded vote, 
as now required. The amendment would maintain the existing option allowing for a formal roll call 
vote. 



120 



(State Election continued) 



Question #6 

Yes 1710 
No 5027 
Blanks 1359 

8096 

Question #7 

F. Shall the town of Wilmington grant licenses for the sale of alcoholic beverages to be 
consumed on the premises to legally chartered clubs within the boundaries of said town? 



Yes 4215 
No 2564 
Blanks 1317 

8096 

Question #8 - (This Question is Non-Binding) (Precincts 1. 2, 4, 5 & 6 only.) 

Shall the Representative from this district be instructed to vote in favor of legislation 
requiring a moratorium on the construction and licensing of new nuclear power plants, and mandating 
instead that the state promote energy conservation and renewable energy sources such as hydro- 
electric and solar power? 



Yes 2646 
No 3026 
Blanks 1181 

6853 

Priscilla R. W. Lynch 
Town Clerk 

Attest: Wilmington, Mass. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 8, 1980 - BARROWS AUDITORIUM 



TO: EITHER OF THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 



GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed by the Revised By- 
Laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in 
Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Barrows Auditorium in the High School, in said Town of Wilmington on 
Monday, the eighth day of December A.D. 1980 at 7:30 P.M., then and there to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Charter to include the following: 
RECALL OF ELECTED OFFICERS 

(a) Application-Any person who holds an elected town office with more than six months remaining of the term 
of office may be recalled from the office by the voters in the manner provided in this section. 

(b) Recall Petitions-One hundred and fifty or more voters may file with the town clerk an affidavit contain- 
ing the name of the officer whose recall is sought and a statement of the grounds upon which the petition is 
based. The signatures on such petitions shall contain the names of at least ten voters in each of the 
precincts into which the town is divided for the purpose of electing town officers. 

If the said petition is found to be valid the town clerk shall thereupon deliver to the ten persons first 
named on such petitions, petition blanks demanding said recall, printed forms of which he shall keep available. 
Ihe blanks may be completed by printing or typewriting; they shall be addressed to the Board of Selectmen; 
They shall contain the names of the ten persons to whom they are issued and the grounds for recall as stated 
in the affidavit; they shall demand the election of a successor to the office; they shall be dated and signed 
by the town clerk. The recall petitions shall be returned to the office of the town clerk within twenty days 
following the date they are issued, signed by at least ten percent of the total number of persons registered 
to vote as of the date of the most recent town election. 

The town clerk shall, within twenty-four hours following such filing with him, submit the petitions to 
the board of registrars of voters which shall within five days thereafter, certify thereon the number of 
signatures which are the names of voters. 

(c) Recall Elections - If the petitions shall be certified by the registrars of voters to be sufficient, the 
town clerk shall forthwith submit the same with his certificate to the Board of Selectmen. Upon its receipt 
of the certified petition the Board of Selectmen shall forthwith give notice, in writing, of said petition to 



121 



(Special Town Meeting continued) 



the officer whose recall is sought. If said officer does not resign his office within five days following 
delivery of the said notice, the Board of Selectmen shall order a special election to be held not less than 
thirty-five nor more than sixty days after the date of the certification of the town clerk that the petitions I 
is sufficient. If a vacancy occurs in the office after a recall election has been ordered, the election 
shall nevertheless proceed as provided in this section, but only the ballots for candidates need be counted. 

(d) Nomination of Candidates-An officer whose recall is sought may not be a candidate to succeed himself in 
the event the vote on the question of recall is in the affirmative. The nomination of other candidates, the 
publication of the warrant for the recall election and the conduct of the recall election shall be in accord- ! 
ance with the charter and general laws regulation elections. 

(e) Propositions on the Ballot-Ballots used at the recall election shall state the proposition in the order 
indicated: 

For the recall of 
(name of officer) 



Against the recall of 
(name of officer) 



Adjacent to each proposition shall be a place to vote for either of said propositions. After the said pro- 
position shall appear the word 'candidates' and the names of candidates arranged as determined by a drawing 
by lot conducted by the town clerk which shall be open to the public, unless another arrangement is required 
by a general law. If a majority of the votes cast on the proposition is against the recall the votes for 
candidates need not be counted. If a majority of the votes cast is in favor of the recall the votes for 
candidates shall be counted and the candidate receiving the highest number of votes shall be declared elected. 

(f) Officeholder - The incumbent shall continue to hold his office and to perform his duties until the re- 
call election. If he is not then recalled he shall continue in office for the remainder of his unexpired 
term, subject to recall as provided in section (g) below. 

If the officer is recalled he shall be deemed removed upon the certification of the election results. 
The candidate who receives the highest number of votes shall serve for the balance of the unexpired term. 

(g) Request of Recall Petition-No recall petition shall be filed against an officer within six months after 
he takes office, or in the case of an officer subjected to recall election and not recalled thereby, until 
at least six months after the election at which his recall was submitted to the voters; or do anything in 
relation thereto. (Petition) 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to acquire land for conser- 
vation purposes as authorized by Chapter 40, Section 8C of the Massachusetts General Laws, said land to be 
managed by the Conservation Commission; and to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, 
receive as a gift, or execute an option for a certain parcel of land bound and described as follows: 

Westerly by land of Stevens 870.49' 

Southerly by land of Stevens 80.00' 

Westerly by Faneuil Drive, land of the 33.15' & 193.95' 

Town of Wilmington, and land of Norton 

Northerly by land of Norton and land of Peters 132.90' 
Westerly by land of Peters 140.43' 
Northwesterly by River Street, land of 167.94' & 121.49' 

the Town of Wilmington and land of Romanski 
& Brewster 

Northeasterly by land of Bottari, land 271.77' 
of Falanga, and land of Labrie 

Southeasterly by land of Connolly 385.84' & 179.69' 

Northeasterly by land of Connolly 187.44' , 70.83', 150.20* 

217.46' , 145.07', & 91.81' 
Southeasterly by land of Connolly 80.74', 97.72', 115.29' & 234.81' 

Southerly by land of Towne Shopping 345.75' 
Center Realty Trust 

containing 13% acres, being part of Lot 9 on LC case 14154L and part of Parcel 178 on Assessors' Map 44, and 
as shown on a sketch on file in the Office of the Town Clerk; and to determine how an appropriation shall be 
raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise; and to authorize 
the Selectmen and Conservation Commission to apply for assistance from the State and Federal governments; or 
do anything in relation thereto. (Petition) 



122 



(Special Town Meeting continued) 



\RTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to acquire land for conserva- 
tion purposes as authorized by Chapter 40 section 8C of the Massachusetts General Laws, said land to be 
nanaged by the Conservation Commission; and to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, 
receive as a gift, or execute an option for a certain parcel of land bound and described as follows: 

Northwesterly by land of Stevens 385.84' & 179.69' 

Southwesterly by land of Stevens 187.44', 70.83', 150.20', 

217.46' & 130' 

Southeasterly by land of Connolly 185' & 440' 

Northeasterly by land of Cosnell, 100', 90.35' & 255.89' 

King St. Ext., land of Corricelli, 
land of Hopel, land of Kucinski and 
land of Labrie 

containing 7 acres, being part of Parcel 5 on Assessors' Map 53 and as shown on a sketch on file in the Office 
of the Town Clerk; and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise: and to authorize the Selectmen and Conservation Commission 
to apply for assistance from the State and Federal governments; or do anything in relation thereto. (Petition) 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of undertaking 
and completing a property equalization program in accordance with the laws of the Commonwealth and determine 
how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington by deleting 
Section III-1.B.2. in its entirety and substituting a new Section III-1.B.2. to permit uses for Federal or 
State Aided Housing Projects for Elderly Persons, age 62 or over, and handicapped persons, including multiple 
unit buildings, by special permit by the Board of Appeals as specified in Section VIII-4.C., all as proposed 
in an amendment now on file with the Town Clerk and available for inspection. 



"Section III-1.B.2. 



Hospital, ambulatory care center including related medical services, 
sanitarium, nursing, rest or convalescent home, charitable institution, 
Federal or State Aided Housing Projects for Elderly Persons, age 62 or 
over, and handicapped persons, including multiple unit single story 
buildings, of which no one building shall be closer than one hundred and 
fifty (150) feet to any single family residence existing at the time of 
the beginning of construction or any such multiple units, or other similar 
non-correctional institutional use, provided that a site plan has been 
submitted to and approved by the Board of Appeals, in which case the area 
of lots, street frontage, yard sizes, width and depth of lots, set backs, 
building height and lot coverages shall be as shown on the site plan as 
approved;" 

or do anything in relation thereto. (Wilmington Housing Authority) 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept the Federally funded 80 units of low and moderate income 
elderly housing. (Wilmington Housing Authority) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept the Federally funded 25 units of low and moderate income 
family housing. (Wilmington Housing Authority) 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Berkshire Builders, 
Inc., Bedford, New Hampshire, a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as Parcel 167 on Assessors' Map 44 
bound and described as follows: 

6300 square feet, more or less, Faneuil Drive, Lots 226-229 Pinegrove Park, 

said land to be used in conjunction with adjacent land, all of which will be used exclusively for housing for 
the elderly and also subject to such other terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine and further 
to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 

123 




ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Middlesex R & S 
Realty Trust 904 Main Street, Wilmington, MA 01887 certain parcels of Town-owned land shown as Parcels 34-36 
on Assessors' Map 24, bound and described as follows: *o«.«io ->h jo 

Southerly by Cook Avenue 170' 135" and 270' 

Easterly by land of the Wilmington 70' 

Redevelopment Authority 

Northerly by land of R & S Realty Trust 560' 
being lots 12-24, block 9 containing 31,300 square feet, substantially as shown on a plan entitled "Woburn 
City Land and Improvement Co., Plan of Section D, Mx. No. Dist. Lib. 6 No. 17, Nov. 1, 1889 Scale 1 in -100 f 
Jos. A. Bancroft, Surveyor", subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further 
to set the miniumum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. (Petition) 

^ll ™ l J\ T ° see lf * he Town wi P vote certain parcels of Town-owned land for conservation purposes, as 
authorized by Chapter 40, Section 8C of the Massachusetts General Laws, said lands to be managed by the 
Conservation Commission. Said parcels as shown on Assessors' Map 24 as Parcels 34 35 and 36 and 
containing approximately 43,400 square feet, or do anything else in relation thereto. '(Petition) 

^"T f ^n] T ^ r6tUrn ° f thlS Warrant ' or a certified copy thereof, with your doings thereon to 

the Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 8 CO 

Given under our hands and seal of said town this 17th day of November A.D. 1980. 

s/Robert J. Cain, Chairman 
s/A. John Imbimbo 
s/Aldo A. Caira 

Selectmen of Town of Wilmington 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETI NG - DECEMBER 8. 1980 - BARROWS AUDITORIUM 

On December 8, 1980 at 7:40 P.M. at the Barrows Auditorium, in the High School the Moderator declared that a 
quorum being present, the Special Town Meeting would come to order for any business to come before it. 

The Moderator, John Callan read the warrant and was interrupted from the floor to dispense with further 
reading of the warrant and take each article by number. This motion was seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 1. Motion by James J. Gorman, was read the same as printed in the warrant as Article 1 with the 
omission of line 1 of paragraph (d) "An officer whose recall is sought may not be a candidate to succeed 
himself in the event the vote on the question of recall is in the affirmative." The motion as amended was 
seconded and after much discussion the vote was taken. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Planning 
Board recommends disapproval. This article requires a 2/3rds vote. The motion carried with Yes 368 No. 106. 
Motion was so voted. ' 

After the vote of the above article, this motion was made by James J. Gorman, "I move on behalf of Concerned 
Citizens of Wilmington, Inc. to consider Articles 6, 7 & 8 at this time, postponing the consideration of 
Articles 2 and 3 until the aforementioned articles are resolved." This motion was seconded and so voted. 

Motion by Mr. Paul Theodos: "I move to combine Articles 6 & 7 to read as follows; To see if the Town will 

feSerallv C funLH 9. tr 1 ^ f Unded , 80 " nlt8 ° f low and moderate income ^derly housing together with the 
federally funded 25 units of low and moderate income family housing." 

After conferring with the Town Counsel the moderator announced that he would allow discussion on both but the 

vote would be taken separately. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept the federally funded 80 units of low and moderate income 
elderly housing. (Wilmington Housing Authority) Planning Board recommends approval. Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion by George Hooper: "I move that the Town vote to accept the Federally funded 

!.J n 5 v *o fl M ?° derate lnc0me elderl y housing." After much discussion a vote was taken. Majority vote 

needed. Yes 62 No 388. Motion lost. 



124 



(Special Town Meeting continued) 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept the Federally funded 25 units of low and moderate income 
family housing. (Wilmington Housing Authority) Planning Board recommends approval. Finance Committee 
recommends disapproval. Motion by George Hooper to withdraw this article, motion was seconded but an over- 
whelming response of the voters denied this motion. The motion as printed in the warrant was voted on and 
the results were very definitely negative. A voice vote was taken and the Moderator announced that the 
motion had lost . 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Berkshire Builders, 
Inc., Bedford, New Hampshire, a certain parcel of Town owned land shown as Parcel 167 on Assessor's Map 44 
bound and described as follows: 

6300 square feet, more or less, Faneuil Drive, Lots 226-229 Pinegrove Park, 
said land to be used in conjunction with adjacent land, all of which will be used exclusively for housing for 
the elderly and'also subject to such other terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine and 
further to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 
(Wilmington Housing Authority) Planning Board recommends approval. Finance Committee recommends approval. 
George hooper made a motion to pass over this article. Motion lost. Mr. Morris made the motion as the 
original motion as above after Mr. Hooper's motion to withdraw was lost. After much discussion the vote was 
taken. $3,000 was set as minimum amount to be paid. Yes 24 No 413. Motion lost. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to acquire land for conser- 
vation purposes as authorized by Chapter 40, Section 8C of the Massachusetts General Laws, said land to be 
managed by the Conservation Commission; and to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, 
receive as a gift, or execute an option for a certain parcel of land bound and described as follows: 

Westerly by land of Stevens 870.49' 

Southerly by land of Stevens 80.00' 

Westerly by Faneuil Drive, land of the 33.15' & 193.95' 

Town of Wilmington, and land of Norton 

Northerly by land of Norton and land of Peters 132.90' 
Westerly by land of Peters 140.43' 
Northwesterly by River Street, land of 167.94' & 121.49' 

the Town of Wilmington and land of Romanski 
& Brewster 

Northeasterly by land of Bottari, land 271.77' 
of Falanga, and land of Labrie 

Southeasterly by land of Connolly 385.84' & 179.69' 

Northeasterly by land of Connolly 187.44', 70.83', 150.20' 

217.46', 145.07', & 91.81' 
Southeasterly by land of Connolly 80.74', 97.72', 115.29' & 234.81' 

Southerly by land of Towne Shopping 345.75' 
Center Realty Trust 

containing 13% acres, being part of Lot 9 on LC case 14154L and part of Parcel 178 on Assessors' Map 44, and 
as shown on a sketch on file in the Office of the Town Clerk; and to determine how an appropriation shall be 
raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise; and to authorize 
the Selectmen and Conservation Commission to apply for assistance from the State and Federal governments; or 
do anything in relation thereto. (Article by Petition) 

Motion by Mr. James Gorman, read as above with the insertion of the amount not to exceed $83,000. and issue 
the bonds or notes of the Town therefor, at one time or from time to time, each issue of such bonds or notes 
to be payable in not more than 20 years from it's date, and that the Board of Selectmen and Conservation 
Commission be, and they hereby are, authorized to accept, allocate and expend any funds that may be received 
for this purpose from the Federal or State Government under any grant program, as a contribution toward the 
cost of the project. 

Amendment to Article 2, by Mr. Belbin: "I move that the motion under Article 2 be amended so that the within 
described land be acquired by purchase and the expense of the land purchase be borne by the petitioner, 
namely the Concerned Citizens of Wilmington." This motion was overruled by the Moderator. Planning Board 
disapproved this article. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Two-thirds vote was required. After a 
long discussion Mr. Hooper of the Housing Authority stated that the Board had agreed to withdraw 774 petition 
and would meet formally and vote to do same. After this promise the voters voted on the article which was 
reread by Mr. Callan, with a two-thirds vote required. The vote was as follows. Yes 89 No 292. Motion lost. 



125 



(Special Town Meeting continued) 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to acquire land for 
conservation purposes as authorized by Chapter 40 Section 8C of the Massachusetts General Laws, said land 
to be managed by the Conservation Commission; and to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take'by eminent 
domain, receive as a gift, or execute an option for a certain parcel of land bound and described as follows 
Northwesterly by land of Stevens 385.84' & 179.69' 

Southwesterly by land of Stevens 187.44', 70.83' 150.20' 

217.46''& 130' 

Southeasterly by land of Connolly 185' & 440' 

Northeasterly by land of Cosnell 100', 90.35' & 255.89' 

King Street Ext., land of Corricelli, 
land of Hopel, land of Kucinski and 
land of Labrie 

containing 7 acres, being part of Parcel 5 on Assessors' Map 53 and as shown on a sketch on file in the 
Office of the Town Clerk; and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise: and to authorize the Selectmen and Conservation 
Commission to apply for assistance from the State and Federal governments; or do anything in relation there- 
to. (Article by petition) Planning Board recommends disapproval. Finance Committee recommends disapprova" 
Mr. James Gorman of the Concerned Citizens moved to pass over this article. Motion so voted. Article 
passed over. 

ARTICLE 4 To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of under- 
taking and completing a property equalization program in accordance with the laws of the Commonwealth and 
determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer from available funds, by borrowing or 
otherwise do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommends approval 

1st motion by Robert J. Cain: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $200,000. for 
the purpose of undertaking and completing a property equalization program in accordance with the laws of the 
Commonwealth; and that the Treasurer, with approval of the Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow a sum 
not to exceed $200,000. under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause 18 of the General Laws as 
amended or supplemented, and to issue the bonds or notes of the Town thereof, at one time or from time to 
time, each issue of such bonds to be payable in not more than two years from its date/' Amendment by Aldo 
Caira: I move this contract to be placed for bid with at least four firms being contacted and the Board of 
Selectmen along with the Town Manager and the Chief Assessor award the contract to the most responsible 
bidder. This motion was also signed by Daniel H. Ballou, Jr. 2nd Amendment by Rocco V. DePasquale- "I 
move that the motion under Article 4 be amended by adding the following statement: Upon completion*of the 
revaluation that portion of the tax levy which will be assumed by the residential class of property will 
be adjusted by the Board of Selectmen so as to keep that portion at or about the current level of assessment 

Walter Kaminski Chairman of the Finance Committee spoke about the State revaluation and its impact on the 

7^ I Ba ^ kman moved t0 close discussion and take a vote. Motion was seconded and the Moderator explaii 
ed the order of voting on the article and amendments. 

The vote was taken on the first amendment by voice vote. Motion so voted. 
The vote on the second amendment was also done by voice vote. Motion so voted 

The vote on the main motion as amended required a two-thirds vote, a standing vote was taken. Vote was 
Yes 341 No 4. Motion so voted. 

At this time Rocco DePasquale made a motion to move to Article 10. Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 10 To see if the Town will vote certain parcels of Town-owned land for conservation purposes, as 
authorized by Chapter 40, Section 8C of the Massachusetts General Laws, said lands to be managed by the 

inr S aonrox^l^ L^lnn ^ T" 1 ' " Sh ° Wn ^ Assessors ' Ma P 24 as Parcel * 35, and 36, and contain- 
ing approximately 43,400 square feet, or do anything else in relation thereto. (Article by petition) 

»T ^ 8 ^J 0ar ^ r T nmendS disa PP rova1 ' Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion by Kenneth Fleuelling: 
clrZr-l J f V ° te t0 u transfer care > custody, and control of certain parcels of Town-owned land for 

to bTm a LaYK rP ?r S ; 38 authori2ed ^ Cha P ter *0, Section 8C of the Massachusetts General Laws, said lands 
£ LT*t e / enervation Commission. Said parcels are as shown on Assessors' Map 24 as parcels 34, 
; 3 t ' ^ C0nt31n a PP™*^ately «,400 square feet." Two-thirds vote required. A vote was taken with 
very little discussion. Motion so voted. Yes 219 No 15. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Middlesex R & S 



126 



(Special Town Meeting continued) 



Realty Trust, 904 Main Street, Wilmington, MA 01887 certain parcels of Town-owned land shown as Parcels 34-36 
on Assessors' Map 24, bound and described as follows: 

Southerly by Cook Avenue 170', 135', and 270' 

Easterly by land of the Wilmington 70' 

Redevelopment Authority 

Northerly by land of R & S Realty Trust 560' 
being lots 12-24, block 9, containing 31,300 square feet, substantially as shown on a plan entitled "Woburn 
City Land and Improvement Co., Plan of Section D, Mx. No. Dist. Lib. 6 No. 17, Nov. 1, 1889, Scale 1 in. = 
100 ft., Jos. A. Bancroft, Surveyor", subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, 
and further to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 
(Article by petition.) Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Planning Board recommends approval. Mr. 
Gillis moved that Article 9 follow Article 10. When the petitioner was not available for motion or comment 
the motion was made that we pass over this article. Motion was seconded and so voted. Article passed over. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington by deleting 
Section III-1.B.2. in its entirety and substituting a new Section III-1.B.2 to permit uses for Federal or 
State Aided Housing Projects for Elderly Persons, age 62 or over, and handicapped persons, including multiple 
unit buildings, by Special permit by the Board of Appeals as specified in Section VIII-4.C, all as proposed 
in an amendment now on file with the Town Clerk and available for inspection. 
"Section III-1.B.2. 

Hospital, ambulatory care center including related medical services, sanitarium, nursing, rest or 
convalescent home, charitable institution, Federal or State Aided Housing Projects for Elderly 
Persons, age 62 or over, and handicapped persons, including multiple unit single story buildings, 
of which no one building shall be closer than one hundred and fifty (150) feet to any single family 
residence existing at the time of the beginning of construction or any such multiple units, or other 
similar non-correctional institutional use, provided that a site plan has been submitted to and 
approved by the Board of Appeals, in which case the area of lots,, street frontage,, yard sizes, 
width and depth of lots, set backs, building height and lot coverages shall be as shown on the site 
plan as approved;" 

or do anything in relation thereto. (Article by Wilmington Housing Authority) 
Planning Board recommends approval. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Mrs. Barbara Larsen of the 
Housing Authority moved that this article be passed over. Motion was seconded and so voted. Article passed 
over. 

With all articles having been acted upon, the motion to adjorn the meeting came at 11:20 P.M. was seconded 
and so voted. 

There were 530 voters in attendance at this special Town Meeting. Loans authorized for Article 4, $200,000. 



Priscilla R. W. Lynch 
Town Clerk 

Attest: Wilmington, Massachusetts 



127 



Town Accountant 



ANALYSIS OF CASH ACCOUNT 
July 1, 1979 through June 30, 1980 

Balance as of July 1, 1979 

Add: Cash Receipts 7/1/79 to 6/30/80 

Deduct: Cash Expenditures 7/1/79 to 6/30/80 
Balance on Hand 6/30/80 



ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIVED 

Tax Collections: 



Personal Property, Levy 


1976 


275.20 




1977 


294.12 




1978 


410.06 




1979 


101,904.32 




1980 


372,412.00 


Real Estate, Levy 


1978 


115,225.33 




1979 


156,136.77 




1980 


10,804,245.23 




1981 (Paid in advance) 


1,078.00 


Deferred Real Estate, Levy 


1978 


1,630.00 




1979 


1,607.65 


Betterments Added To Taxes: 






Water Assessments, Levy 


1978 


240.03 




1979 


157.57 




1980 


10,773.75 


Street Assessments, Levy 


1978 


429.18 




1979 


28.31 




1980 


9,031.91 


Sewer Assessments, Levy 


1980 


2,166.53 


Water Liens Added To Taxes: 






Levy 


1978 


1,004.18 




1979 


1,277.08 




1980 


33,736.75 


Sewer Liens Added To Taxes: 






Levy 


1980 




Tax Titles & Possessions: 






Tax Titles Redeemed 




31,498.69 


Tax Possessions 




10,258.00 


Pro-Forma Taxes 






Assessments Paid in Advance: 






Water 




151.10 


Sewer 




352.50 



Suspended Water Betterments paid in full 



1,604,111.49 
68,929.934.05 
70,534,045.54 
69,401,308.79 

1,132,736.75 



475,295.70 



11,076,685.33 
3,237.65 



22,827.28 



36,018.01 
4,228.97 



41,756.69 
277.00 



503.60 

809 . 84 11,661,640.07 



128 



AMOUNTS BORROWED 



S hort Term Loans; 

Temporary Loans, Antic, of Revenue 
Long Term Loans; 

Water Treatment Plant 
Street Betterments 



Federal Aid: 
Schools: 

Public Law #874 

#94-482 (Title IV) 
Handicapped Children (Title VI) 
Reading Skills 
Head Start 
Sewer Grants 
C.E.T.A. Funds 
State Aid: 

Highway Reconstruction & Maintenance 



2,735,000.00 
95,550.00 



GRANTS AND GIFTS 



54,344.22 
24,233.00 
112,532.00 
92,852.00 
17,413.00 



REVOLVING FUNDS 



School Lunch Program: 
State Reimbursements 
Program Receipts 

High School Athletic Association 
Recreation Dedicated Accounts 
Outside Details Account 
Tax Title Recordings 



219,683.69 
265,388.72 



RESTRICTED ACCOUNTS 



Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Water Department; 

Water Rates 

Water Services 

Water Installations 

Industrial Fire Protection Rates 

Industrial Way Pumping Station 

Water Department Refunds 

Water Available Surplus 
Sewer Use (Septage Disposal) 
Veterans Aid Recoveries 

Betterment of Veterans Plot-Wildwood Cemetery 
Carter Lecture Fund, Reimbursements 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Perpetual Care Funds 

Fire Insurance Reimbursements Restricted for 

Boutwell Street School 
Sale of Town Owned Lands 
Accrued Interest-Sale of Bonds 
Premium-Sale of Bonds 
Appropriation Refunds 
Surplus Revenue (Refunds) 



875,821.07 
6,446.56 
710.08 
10,896.96 
21,305.25 
11,058.86 
422.33 



Short Term Investments 
Employee Deductions: 

Federal Withholding 

State Withholding 

Retirement System 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 

Group Insurance 

Washington National Insurance 



AGENCY & TRUST FUNDS 



1,748,318.15 
495,773.73 
515,544.30 
140,117.72 
2,402.88 
5,994.24 

129 



1,000,000.00 



2.830,550.00 



301,374.22 
841,200.00 
7,990.93 

86,464.00 



485,072.41 
3,854.00 
34,232.42 
95,972.63 
197.31 



16,286.15 



926,661.11 
10,000.00 
2,802.00 
2,162.70 
525.18 
10,041.00 
10,200.00 

12,754.13 
11,000.00 
3,988.53 
3,555.23 
140,930.80 
3,353.09 



3,830,550.00 



1,237,029.15 



619,328.77 



1,154,259.92 



41,801,680.56 



I 



AGENCY & TRUST FUNDS 



Employee Deductions; ( cont . ) 
Tax Sheltered Annuities 
Credit Union 
U. S. Savings Bonds 
Union Dues 

Court Ordered Deductions 
Fish & Game Licenses for the Commonwealth 
County Dog Licenses, due the County 
Lunch Food Tax, due the State 
Registry Releases, due the State 



(continued) 



82,910.99 
808,919.00 
15,433.19 
59,334.41 
2,350.00 
8,684.50 
6,156.51 
760.80 
20.00 



3,877,098.61 



15,621.81 



3,892,720.42 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



Schools, State Reimbursements 
Real Estate Abatements, State 

Veterans 

Blind 

Widows 

Elderly 
Loss of Taxes, State 
Lottery Funds, State 
Local Aid Funds, State 
Highway Fund, Chapter 497 
School Building Assistance, State 
Civil Defense Reimbursements, State 
Veterans Benefits Reimbursements 
Motor Vehicle Excise Collections: 

Prior Years 

Current Levy 
Farm Animal Excise' Taxes 
Ambulance Account 
Sewer Rates 
Liquor Licenses 
Interests & Costs: 

Short Term Investments 

Tax Collections 

Water Demands 

Tax Titles Interest & Costs 
General Fund Investments 
Municipal Receipts: 
Selectmen 
Tax Collector 
Town Clerk 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Commissions 
Police Department 
Building Inspector: 

Building Permits 

Wire Permits 

Plumbing Permits 

Gas Permits 

Certification Fees 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Engineering Department 
Cemetery Department 
Drainlayers Permits 
Advertising Fees 
Health & Sanitation: 

Board of Health 

Public Health Narse 

Sale of Dogs 



2,191,627.00 

9,944.90 
962.50 
9,100.00 
30,312.36 
882.63 
115,372.00 
261,738.00 
140,399.00 
144,061.65 
1,185.03 
11,892.15 

460,500.87 
668,086.88 



327,481.39 
53,016.68 
5,987.75 
6,922.71 
75,724.40 

753.00 
5,604.30 
8,021.90 

499.29 



27,117.00 
4,948.25 
1,132.00 
1,115.50 
175.00 



2,917,477.22 



1,128,587.75 
144.60 
4,785.00 
88,290.92 
7,300.00 



469,132.93 



14,878.49 
3,738.50 



4,458.00 
134.00 
234.00 



34,487.75 
745.00 
212.00 
9,239.00 
225.00 
100.00 



4,826.00 



130 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 
(continued) 



Library Receipts 
Conservation Commission 

Insurance & Workmens Comp. Reimbursements 

Witness Fee, Probate Court 

Court Fines 

Cablevision Fees 

Sale of Obsolete Equipment 

Reimbursement of Damaged Buildings 

TOTAL RECEIPTS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1979 TO JUNE 30, 1980 



2,098.48 
325.00 
10,593.00 
35.10 
33,945.42 
585.50 
322.50 
650.00 



4,732,725.16 
$68,929,934.05 



ANALYSIS OF THE ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 
USED BY THE ASSESSORS IN SETTING THE 1980 TAX RATE 
WITH THE ACTUAL 1979 RECEIPTS 





Used by the 
Assessors in 
Setting 1980 
Tax Rate 


Actual 
Receipts 
1979 


More 
Than 
Estimated 


Less 
Than 
Estimated 


Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise 


1,149,847 


.47 


991,613 


01 






158,234 


46 


Licenses 


7,200 


.00 


7,400 


00 


200 


.00 






Fines 


14,446 


.75 


39,917 


90 


25,471 


15 






Special Assessments 


40,388 


.52 


12,866 


98 






27,521 


54 


General Government 


15,097 


.00 


14,261 


53 






835 


47 


Protection of Persons & Property 


18,665 


.55 


50,018 


25 


31,352 


70 






Health & Sanitation 


4,660 


56 


4,447 


50 






213 


06 


Libraries, Local Receipts 


1,185 


59 


1,680 


38 


494 


79 






Cemeteries (Other than Trust Funds & Sale of Lots) 


9,475 


.00 


11,396 


00 


1,921 


00 






Farm Animal Excise 


315 


35 


88. 


35 






227 


00 


Interests 


198,599 


.46 


314,678 


27 


116,078 


81 






Ambulance Services 


4,771 


.08 


4,427. 


25 






343 


83 


Sewer Revenues 


77,842 


03 


87,377. 


58 


9,535 


55 






Workmen's Compensation & Insurance Reimbursements 


5,510 


12 


6,676. 


95 


1,166 


83 






Dog License Reimbursements 


2,608 


00 


2,859. 


71 


251 


71 






Miscellaneous Receipts 


1,513 


93 


1,824. 


62 


310. 


69 








1,552,126 


41 


1,551,534. 


28 


186,783. 


23 


187,375. 


36 



131 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES OTHER THAN THAT RAISED FROM 
APPROPRIATION FOR THE PERIOD 7/1/79 - 6/30/80 



Refunds: 

Personal Property Taxes 

Real Estate Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

Tailings Account 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 

Estimated Receipts 

Overlay Accounts (Interest) 

Ambulance Account 

Sewer Maintenance 

Sewer Liens 

Surplus Revenue 
Water Department: 

Rates 

Services 

Liens 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Sewer Rates 
Registry Releases 
Tax Title Recordings 
Legal Settlements 
Corum Meadows Trust 

Temporary Loans, Anticipation of Revenue 

Anticipation of Bond Issues 
Assessments - State & County: 

State Recreation 

M.D.C. Sewer 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 
Air Pollution Control 
Planning Council 
M.B.T.A. 
State Audit 

Ipswich River Watershed 
County Tax 
County Retirement 
Outside Details: 
Police 
Fire 

Maintenance 

Miscellaneous Departments 
Employee Deductions: 

Withholding Taxes, Federal 

Withholding Taxes, State 

Retirement 

Group Insurance 

Washington National Insurance 

U. S. Savings Bonds 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 

Credit Union 

Union Dues: 

Town Employees 

Police 

Fire 

Maintenance Department 
Teachers 
Court Ordered Deductions 



83,450.88 
102,977.47 
2,418.75 
1,709.54 
2,648.40 
217,343.45 
4,211.28 
400.06 
293,680.23 
328,443.00 



3,630.00 
3,527.48 
2,774.00 
3,431.00 
44,646.15 



1.93 
122,365.52 
16,662.04 
1.98 
200.00 
888.39 
82.66 
15.00 
13.90 
49.94 
65.00 

6,084.61 
5.00 
1,743.40 
790.95 



1,000,000.00 
352,000.00 



415,159.83 
622,123.23 

84,262.64 
542.63 

10,612.36 
437.50 

1,735,461.37 
492,015.20 
481,092.59 
2,370.22 
6,150.22 
15,234.00 
137,931.52 
81,346.53 
800,358.50 



58,008.63 
2,325.00 



140,346.36 



8,623.96 
2,015.40 
14.00 
248.73 
40,221.37 
7,598.67 

1,352,000.00 



1,037,283.06 



95,855.13 



3,812,293.78 



132 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 

Agency Accounts: 

County Dog Licenses 3,804.10 

Fish & Game Licenses 8,043,. 75 

Lunch Food Tax 767.33 

Recreation, Dedicated Accounts 37,765.91 

Premium, Sale of Bonds 3,555.23 

School Lunch Program 411,854.54 

High School Athletic Association 16,381.57 

C.E.T.A. 4*714!36 

Carter Lecture Funds 525.18 

Cemetery Trust Funds 10,700.00 498,111.97 
Federal Grants and Aid - School: 

Public Law #864 H 920.67 

Handicapped Children, Title IV 115,'o36.37 

Reading Skills, Title I 94,623.56 

Head Start 14,662.00 

Learning Skills, Title IVB 23,015.88 259,258.48 

Short Term Investments 44,326,680.56 

Total Expenditures from General Accounts $51,580,551.47 



Balance on hand July 1, 1979 
Received 7/1/79 through 6/30/80 
Balance on hand June 30, 1980 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
DETAIL OF REVENUE SHARING 
JULY 1, 1979 TO JUNE 30, 1980 



Federal Grants 



$575,576.00 



Interest Received 
On Investments 



$16,198.21 



Expended 



$560,000.00 



Balance 
On Hand 

$26,498.73 



$58,272.94 



Expenditures: 

Police Salaries 
Fire Salaries 



$280,000.00 
$280,000.00 
$560,000.00 



"I certify that this is a true extract 
of the Revenue Sharing Funds of the 
Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts." 



Robert H. Peters 
Town Accountant 



133 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1980 

ASSETS 



Cash 

Warrants Paid in Advance 
Short Term Investments 
Petty Cash Advances 
Taxes Uncollected: 
Prior Levies 

Personal Property 1977 
1978 
1979 

Real Estate Taxes 1979 
Current Levies 

Personal Property 1980 
Real Estate Taxes 1980 
Personal Property in Litigation, Levy 1969 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes: 
Prior Levies 
Levy 1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 

Current Levy, 1980 
Farm Animal Excise Tax 1978 
Tax Titles & Possessions: 

Tax Titles 

Tax Possessions 
Assessments Added to Taxes: 



Street Assessments 1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 

Water Assessments 1978 
1979 
1980 

Unapportioned Sewer Betterments 
Sewer Betterments 1978 

1979 

1980 

Betterments in Litigation 
Street 1972 
1973 

Accounts Receivables: 
Water Department 
Rates 
Services 

Commercial & Industrial Fire Protection 
Industrial Way Pumping Station 
Water Installations 
Water Liens, 1978 

1979 

1980 

Sewer Rates 
State Aid to Highways 
County Aid to Highways 
Ambulance Account 
Veterans ' Benefits 
Temporary Loans/Anticipation of State & 
County Aid to Highways - 
Paid in Advance of Reimbursement 
Unprovided for Accounts: 
Overlay Deficits: 

Levy 1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 

Legal Settlements 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Underestimates - Assessments 

Ipswich River Watershed Assessment , 1980 

State Recreation Assessment, 1980 

Mass. Bay Transit Authority, 1980 

Due from School Lunch Program 

Recreation Dedicated Account 

Court Ordered Deductions 
Loans Authorized 
Revenue, 1981 



369.36 
176.50 
410.80 



23,608.86 
229,465.81 



206.09 
3,134.58 
7,264.17 
10,710.10 
12,976.14 
22,590.69 
35,359.51 
80,102.76 



95.96 
93.76 
91.52 
132.61 
502.90 
427.40 
1.79 
675.58 
1,657.55 

6,377.95 
6,226.07 
6,074.23 

85.61 
98.20 



'■3.50 
1,726.85 
2,879.86 

202,899.96 
13,471.40 
9,595.50 
9,233.59 



15.60 
135.70 
32.45 
67.80 
224.00 
604.37 
8,257.89 
76,345.71 
11,262.60 



356.35 
4,159.95 
17,804.61 
4,330.71 
84.21 
25.00 



615,166.48 
648,869.06 
3,625,000.00 
625.00 



956.66 
116,971.61 



253,074.67 
462.00 



4,889,660.54 



172,344.04 
208,304.90 



103,090.10 
91,150.41 



1,344.15 



2,334.92 
30,374.97 



18,678.25 



183.81 



90,402.61 
2,415.13 

440.00 
10,078.27 

223.68 



4,650.21 
3,295.77 

216,371.36 

18,829.09 



96,946.12 
40,221.37 
250.00 



22,320.91 
4,439.92 



371,464.94 



380,648.94 
119.50 



194,240.51 



52,916.10 



346,706.12 



4,427.92 



164,178.32 
5,750,000.00 
15,652,894.00 



TOTAL ASSETS 



$27,807,256.89 



134 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1980 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 

Warrants Payable 131,298.79 

1978 Real Estate Tax, Overpaid 61.12 

Tax Title Recording Fee 3.50 

1978 Water Betterment, Overpaid .64 

Estimated Sewer Betterments Paid in Advance 352.50 

Registry Releases 6.00 
Employee Payroll Deductions: 

Retirement System 108,474.64 

Group Insurance 533.20 

Washington National Insurance 1,237.37 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 20,846.85 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 16,183.66 

Union Dues 1,338.42 

Federal Withholding Taxes 12,856.78 

State Withholding Taxes 3,758.53 

U.S. Savings Bonds 199.19 

Credit Union 8,560.50 173,989.14 
Agency Accounts: 

Fish and Game Licenses 640.75 

County Dog Licenses 3,873.06 

State Food Tax 45.12 4,558.93 
Revolving Accounts: 

High School Athletic Account 5,043.40 
Federal Grants & Aids: 



Public Law #874 81,900.15 
#85/864 82,558.13 
Special Education VI (202-203-204) 4,149.56 
Head Start 1981 17,413.00 
Occupational Education/Molding Projects 628.63 
/Exploring Ind. Arts 1,731.44 
Law Collection Development Project 4.87 
Inter library Loan Improvement Project 30.59 
Learning Resources IV-B 4.99 

CETA Funds 3,443.12 191,864.48 

Arts & Humanities (Library) 100.00 

Library Memorial Fund 75.69 175.69 

Tailings Account 7,335.66 
Accrued Interest, Sale of Bonds 14,090.61 
Group Insurance/Blue Cross, Dividend 11,526.00 
Sale of Real Estate 2,800.00 
Sale of Town-owned Land 11,100.00 
Sewer Department 38,318.10 
Betterment of Veterans' Cemetery Plot 2,162.70 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 9,841.80 
Fire Insurance Reimbursement/Available for 

Appropriations - Glen Road School 33,796.00 
- Boutwell Street School 12,754.13 
Overestimates, State & County Assessments: 

County Tax, 1980 12,732.23 

M.D.C. Sewer Assessment, 1980 1,266.80 

Metropolitan Air Pollution Assessment, 1980 717.43 14,716.46 

Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 



Farm Animal Excise 119.50 
Motor Vehicle Excise 380,648.94 
Special Assessments 52,731.65 
Tax Titles & Possessions 194,240.51 
Departmental Revenue 18,829.09 
Water Revenue 108,209.90 
Sewer Revenue 3,295.77 
State & County Aid to Highways Revenue 216,371.36 
Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 625.00 

Special Tax Revenue 645.81 975,717.53 

Appropriation Balances Reserved for Encumberances , 1980 608,430.92 
Appropriation Balances Reserved for Capital Projects, 1980 1,861,127.96 
Special Revenue Accounts Reserved to 1981 22,746.20 
Loans Authorized and Unissued 5,750,000.00 
Appropriation Control, 1981 16,616,289.00 
Water Available Surplus 415,622.52 
Surplus Revenue 891,527.11 

TOTAL LIABILITIES & RESERVES $27,807,256.89 



135 



ANALYSIS OF THE MATURING DEBT 



INSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT 

Wilmington Memorial Library 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $485,000 
Land Acq. Town Forest (1975) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $169,000 
Sewer Main Bonds (1971) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $275,000 
Sewer Main Bonds (1973) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $264,000 
Sewerage System & Treatment Facility 

G/L 44, Sec. 7, $1,865,000 
Urban Renewal Bonds 

G/L 212b, Sec. 20, $200,000 
Street Construction Bonds (1979) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $95,550 
Stree Construction Bonds (1974/75) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $27,284 



Balances 
7/1/79 



210,000 
105,000 
155,000 
170,000 
1,765,000 
60,000 

13,642 
2,478,642 



Added 
1979/80 



95,550 



95,550 



Paid-Off 
1979/80 



25,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
100,000 
20,000 

13,642 
203,642 



Balances 
6/30/80 



185,000 

90,000 

140,000 

155,000 

1,665,000 

40,000 

95,550 

-0- 
2,370,550 



OUTSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT 



Boutwell Street School 

Acts 645/48, $400,000 
North Intermediate School 

Acts 645/48, $1,050,000 
Woburn Street School 

Acts 645/48, $597,000 
Woburn Street School Addition 

Acts 645/48, $660,000 
West Intermedite School 

Acts 645/48, $1,445,000 
Shawsheen Ave. School 

Acts 645/48, $1,674,720 
Shawsheen Ave. School (2nd Issue) 

Acts 645/48, $100,000 
Water Main Bonds, New Well Field £■ Mains 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $463,529 
Salem Street Well Field & Mains 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $320,000 
Improvements to System, N.E. Sector Town 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $550,000 
Water Main Bonds (1974/75) 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $11,940 
Water Treatment Plant (1979/80) 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $2,735,000 



COMBINED TOTALS 



20,000 
110,000 
142,000 
240,000 
415,000 
550,000 
30,000 
60,000 
120,000 
360,000 
2,388 

2,049,388 
4,528,030 



2,735,000 
2,735,000 

2,830,550 



20,000 
55,000 
30,000 
30,000 
70,000 
110,000 

5,000 
30,000 
20,000 
35,000 

2,388 

407,388 
611,030 



-0- 

55,000 

112,000 

210,000 

345,000 

440,000 

25,000 

30,000 

100,000 

325,000 

-0- 

2.735.000 
4,377,000 

6,747,550 



LOANS AUTHORIZED AND UNISSUED 

Sewer Mains, Article #12, Town Meeting 6/23/75 $ 5,135,000.00 

Water Treatment Plant, Article #1, Special Town Meeting 9/24/79 600,000.00 

$ 5,735,000.00 



136 



CO 

w 

C5 



oo 

H 
H 
W 

oo 



gfa 

H H 

O CO 

z 3 

tA 
H 



00 w 
w £ 
o 5 



&3g 

H « H 



o> Z w 

H 5 

fa fa fa 

M < 

W SB W 

U W S>h 



fa 

o 



§ § 
g.fa 



0) 

T3 CJ 

<U (3 
■u cfl 
CJ rH 

•h ca 
u ca 

4J 

CO T3 

s § 

fa 



01 

u 

C3 O 

ca oo 

rH \ 
CO O 

pa co 

T3 vo 

§ 

fa 



CO 

co cu 
u -g 



(0 
01 
hi 
3 

W O 
•H 00 
T3 Ov 

a h 

0) 

I 

fa 



CTV 00 rH 

m o rH 

vO M H 

o m co 
q-> oo 



o o o 
o o o 

m m o 
n •* o 
H <f 
#* « »> 

N H O 
vO CN 



ON 00 rH 
m O rH 

H » H 

00 Cv CO 
00 VO CN 

CO vO vO 

p- cn 



O 
O 

d 
m 
m 







CO 


o 


m 


CO 


-a 


CO 


H 


>o 


01 










M 


-a 


o> 


ro 


<* 


01 


-a 


m 




p» 


■M 


< 


CM 


vO 




a 






ft 


»> 


H 






<r 


H 



01 








a 




00 


vO 




CN 


Ov 




Cfl CTi 








rH 


CN 


<r 


vO 


Cfl ^ 


CN 




m 


P3 rH 


vO 


<r 


•9 










"a r- 


CO 


CM 


<r 


s 




vO 


CN 


fa 









I 
ca 



CO 






j* 




| 




i 




cfl 


> 


CO 




ca 


■H 


ca 


fa 




i-l 






10 


cfl 


vO 


*J 


60 


U 


OO 


CO 


c 


01 


H 


a 


■H 


Oh 


•H 






o 






iS 


o 






to 


O 


co 


E? 


1-1 


60 


00 


0) 




5 


a 


1-1 


> 


•H 


•H 




a 


T3 


13 


1 




cfl 


cfl 


OJ 










4 




2 



CO CN 
CO rH 



O O 

O O 

d d 

o o 

o o 



P^ CO 
CO CM 
CO H 



O CO 
O CN 

P- Ov 
Ov vO 
CO rH 



m 

CM 

m 



o\ m 

in -j 

vo m 

<f ov 



■a 







cfl 






ca 












CO 


fa 




ao 
1 


0) 










> 


3 




cfl 


w 


cfl 


Cfl 


CJ 


pq 




1) 




4J 


fa- 


CO 


a 




00 


3 




a 


u 


il 


•H 




4-1 


> 


cu 


M 


cfl 


> 


cfl 


co 


•H 


O 


60 

a 


fa 


d 


•H 






T3 


3 


d 


Cfl 








'§ 


CO 




3 



o 
o 

d 
o 

CN 



vO 

p^ 



CN 



o 

oo 
-a- 
-a- 



fa 

H 

cfl 
M 

A 



m 
o\ 

co 
co 
co 



o 
o 

d 
o 
m 



in 
on 

CO 
CO 

oo 



CN 
CN 



m 
«a- 



CO 

p~ 

00 
00 

p^ 





•a 






a 






3 






fa 






& 


M 




cfl 


a 




U 


cfl 




-O 


ca 




•r( 




CO 


rJ 


to 


00 




00 


a 


ft* 


a 


•H 


y 


•H 


> 


3 


> 


Cfl 


ca 


Cfl 


Cfl 




co 




a 




u 


•H 


u 


0) 




cu 


> 




> 


o 


n 


o 




a 






01 






pa 





CO 
vO 



o 
o 

d 
o 
m 



CO 

vo 

o> 
-a- 

vO 



OS 



o 



CO 



CO 
OV 

in 
o 

vO 



T3 




fa 




cd 




h 


















| 


£. 


cfl 


u 


ca 


1 


CO 


CO 


oo 




a 




•H 


cj 






c^ 


0) 




4-i 




■u 


00 


o 


s 


H 


•H 


U 


13 


cfl 


cfl 


Ch 


Re 



o 
o 

p- 
m 

CM 



On 

CN 
O 



00 
CO 







1 








fa 




rH 




O 




O 




-C 









CO 








0) 








rH 




Cfl 


ft* 


3 


1 


1 




u 


ca 


01 




ft* 


CO 


rH 


60 


CO 


a 


3 


•H 




IS 






o 


CO 


o 




o 


60 




a 


co 


•H 


u 


ID 


CO 


0) 


si 




CO 





o 
o 

d 
o 
m 



o 
m 

VO 



o 
o 



p-» 
m 

vo 
o 
vo 



CO 
CM 



o 
o 

o 
o 

CM 



CO 
CM 



CO 

<3\ 



CO 
CN 



O 

CO 



oo 



vO 
vO 



O 

o 
d 

CM 

oo 



00 

<■ 

m 
oo 
<■ 



CO 

CO 
vO 
CO 



CN 
CM 



u 






G 






erne 


nd 




> 


9 




o 


fa 




u 




ft* 


dm 


& 


an 


rH 


ra 


ca 


a 




to 


o 


■H 


60 


u 


rJ 


q 


60 




■H 


5 


a 


is 


•H 







I 


•H 


C^ 




W 




•H 


Cfl 


00 


3 


•H 


C 




U 


•H 


u 





•d 


CO 


CO 


cfl 


rfl 






W 


J 


5 



vO 




O 




• 

00 




vO 












O 




CO 




o 




o 




r> 




en 




CM 








vO 




©\ 




vO 




O 




• 




in 




vO 




r» 








vO 




CM 




iH 




O 




o 




d 




m 




m 








CTi 




oo 




o\ 




oo 




r«. 




CTV 




P~ 




oo 




rH 




• 




m 




CM 




m 




vO 




CM 








rH 




vO 




p~ 








Ov 




o 




iH 





CO 

i 

EH 



137 



I 2 
S2 9 



3 



r*» oo 
iH co 


C <N 
O 


on 00 


g 


CM 

r-. 


uo 



f-1 



5 



15 



OWN 
rH O 



co co m \o 
n n <j n 
O O o-n 



CM PI rl 

o\ co <r 
o o 



m rv o 
O ^ h tn 

ON ON 



rH vO © 
CO vO CM 

o o 



00 CM 

<r cm 

CO CM 



O CO 
u-i <j\ 
r-« oo 



o o 
o 

U0 00 



CO rH 
ON CM 
vD CM 



co oo m 
m o 

CM CO iH 



rs m co 
On co oo 

OV NO 



O CO r-* CM 
co co m vo 

ONi-i ^ CO 



On U0 P** 
UN, fs ^ 
m CO UO 



CO >H sO 
CM CO CO 
CO \& r-t 



*H O 
_ CO 

a on 



o o 

O uo 
U0 CM 



O CM 

<r on 



o o 
o o 

O CM 



o o 
O <r 
r- cm 



CO H O 

co uo 

CO CM rH 



r-* r** o 

I s * NO U0 

co m n 



r-» un o O 
o uo o 

ON «H uO O 



on mo 

CO His 



•3 CO O 

to Mn 

U0 CO sO 



«-t O O 
ON CM O 
CM C*. CM 



0) H cd CJ 



"2 '3 



CO CO 41 
fH i-t p. 
CO CO K 




4J H * 

CJ O *J 
• OO 



&&3 



co co 
en c/3 




o a u 

co -rf 41 

co o J3 

41 B u 

CO -H O 



o u I 



138 



Is 



0) 03 
B 



-H O 
1- 00 
CX ON 
O rH 



X) O 
C CO 

<y on 



1-1 ON 

M 1 H 



o o 
o o 
o o 



o o 
o o 
© o 



r-- \o 
CO on 



O <^ 
O <J 

m co 



in oo r- 



on en 

vO \D 

on o co n 
-j in in n 



o 

ON iH 



n>j o 

v£> CO CTv 
CM ON 



<rcoc-oNOOOo<N<r 

cmcncnoocooOCO 



r- cm O 
m vo cm 
m n co 



NOM^jNcooinHin 
r^OrHcnr*iHOf^ONi~- 
HcorvHCMncocoyDm 



h o> I s * co vo o co <r r-» 
«j Oi m m m ci o o ' — <r 
cm cm o <J" on ©mocM 



O vO 
O m 
m o 



o o on o-J-ooooooom 

o o CM como©00©u"»©CN| 

o o r~~- vo<j ooowcoiomn 



com<-joo o f- o o 
on i— I co vo O O o cn cm m 
v£> CI c*1 o O OOHCM 



flj O iH 0> 0) 



UH HI h 



f— t -H CO iw Q 
H [u H >x O 



> U tH o en -H 
d « 0) Q -H x: 



u d oi y-< 



&5 



•H a 4) t< H U 

,i flj 0) "H M C8 



*j 01 CJ (J *J ■ 
fflrHCO-HXctJOa. 



139 




01 u 

1° I 



1 § 



it B b 

u o 

9) W _ 

ir 



•H O 
l-< 00 

a o 



•a o 
a co 



09 U 



o o 
o o 
l> o 



H to 
so 

cs to 



8 o> Q r- 
co © so 

00 

co o H « 
co ©so 



ro in oa 

00 iH w 



SO O ' 
o 5 i 



Ol N 
N SO N 



O O 
O so 

o cs 



It 



cm <r 
00 r- 



CO 00 

s 



CS I-. O ■» CO 00 

H H o oo r» 



O ^ so 

cs oa 
r- oo o 



oo oa 
m cs 
O H 



h m m 
oa co «» 
oa cs 



rH CO 
OA .H 

CSI CO 



so in 

H OS 
CO OA 



SO O 

-cf m 
m so 



co o 

OA 8 



8 8 S 

moo 
o © r~ 
^ m so 



888 



SO O ( 
O O I 



88 88 888 



m co o 

CM \C © 
r*» CM «H 



en m 
a\ so 



S88 

CM O O 



o> O 

88 



en o 
3 S 



d o 



S88 



1 
a 



3 



■at 3^-3 fr-g-a e-s-a I 



■H 

00 

a n 


4J Qj 

c u 




i E 
:he 


lis 




ai 5 o 

91 5 
OHO) 


inses 
ly Depai 
iry Sup< 
tries 01 




■H 91 

i&fl 

H i a 


CO 
OJ 

7) 
a 




Mi W WJ ttf 
f ll *Sv M f« 


EXp€ 


H 


Hi i 




140 



o o 

O ON 



O CM 
O O 
O On 



O O 

o o 
o o 



rH O 
CM O 
rH On 



h fo m 
vo r» in 

0«ON 



o en o 
-3- o 
0\ r-» m 



fl O ^ On O 
CM • m Oi N o 

rH 00 CM O 



\o n o "J on o 

CN IT| 0> N O 
rH 00 CM -tf O 



CM O CM 

in on 
o cn 



>C H Cl sO O O 

n H m o r- O 
ao <■ on cm m o 



<■ oo o o o o o 
r-- co in m o O O 
r- rH o oo m o O 



O cn 
O ON 
CM CM 



m \£> m <r 

rH CM CM rH 
ON m rH r- 



m r- m o 

rH m CM O 
0\ IA fl O 



cn O 

m co 



cn o 
oo cn 

CM >3" 



HOHSO<TO 
^ N H CO O 

m rH rH m SO 



cn cn cn o cn «c 
mcoioomeo 
O cm o oo m 



Sm oo cm -<r o o 
rH en oo cm o 
•-H on oo m m o 



vO rH 



NHO O O O O 

rs o o o cm o 
h co m o o m o 




flj G) H 

XI u u 
g n) (Q 

3 U £ 



rH ■ 
O 00 i 




CM O* 
s0 f*- 



\0 f^- -J ONNO 
CM On On O ^ O tN 
vO r- O N H CM 



i— I m oo ' 



4-1 *0 
CO C *H 
C cfl at 



O (N 
m o -a- 

O O rH 



m o 
o 
cm m 



oo m oo 
<■ o. r-v 

MA tO 



m cm 
o» oo 



O 
o 



Or^OlOOO^vD^OCN 
O( y lor*-f s JOty i rHf^-0> 



■H O 

i-t oo 
a on 

O rH 



o o 
o o 
oo m 



o m 

N 00 < 

m on r*» 



<r un o 
-d- on 
r- m r-*- 



o o 
o o 
m r- 



O in 
O oo 
cm m 



O r*- 
O cm 
m on 



o tHoomooooo 

O CMOO-HOOOOO 

o NOOONomoomo 



o> n -j in i 



! m f*» 



"O o 
C 00 
0t O. 



O -H 

rH r~ 



u ON 
4* <U I 
> J2 C> 



o e on 
c o 

CO r- ON 



o to >, to 



X 3 C X 3 
£ UO-H U O 



rl H H a JJ 
rH tO CO X 3 
A C/l t/1 W O 



a. o x 

41 01 U 
QUO 
*H 

c Q tn n 
o at at 

•H >, -H 0) 



Jl H H O. 



i-i to cy rH c 



a U 91 91 

>■, Q> CO -H W 
CO XJ " 



> u a >H 

M Id 0) -H 



Q. 4-1 V- OJ rH P. tj 

X 3 CO M co X 
U O I G CO (jJ 



CO 01 

3 & 



O tfl t-i CO u 

c *-> at c at 

CO M U M 4J 

Com a 

at o. co *o > 



C CO CO U U CO 3 
•OSCJCMCCO* 
HI tn tI H O "H - 



■H tM D. CO 

>U tl -H 4 31 £ I 

•h > c esc; 

CO t-i Q CO M i 

n hi 11 o c v 

CO CO T3 C 5 3 

r-H D C O O U 

u os r-t co H co 



u h -h at H < 

r-t 0) u to to 
<owa>op-Hotcu 
Ot03BO-3H^ 
O 0) rH CD P-h-H-H 



1A2 



T3 Cv 
3 ■ rH 



IS 
O rH 
ffl 

r 



•H O 
h 00 

a a* 
o -t 



■2 £ 



r» o 

00 <J 



o oo 
m cn 
o co 



r- o 
oo -<r 



O O ffiOO-J 

mm c o h in 

m CT\ O vD o 

m <r o w a* 



o co 

O CO 



IT) 00 

r-. \D 



m on 

cm 



C*1 O © CM CJ\ 

<-t o o i-i m 

tJ> i/^ vO o 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 
o m <r o o 



o <r 
rH m 

v£> O 
CI On 



O 00 o 

in d o 

O CO o 



O ON 
vj U-l 



00 <■ vO O 

oo r- co <r 

rH o o 

n vo h 

\D O* CO CO 

<T H N 



r- rH O O 
CO CO O vf 
r~i m O O 



o u jz 

SHU 
n ri 
H 0- O 
3 2 

a i 
B o -a 

Q Pw (O 



0- Cu CD 



U^TJ B H H H fl, 

a> y <! o *j 4J 4J 



im >* ^ a o ai 

i cd a] -H O >-. 

i ^ o 

x £ y oh 

■ 00 00 ca to ~ 



i -o cd *o a a - 

i oj H *0 M M eg 

« ( < a 



^ U 4-» OJ u 

n] td Qj u 
O O > £3 < 



. o o u 

W Z U 

fl HI \ O 

CO CO U O 

111 J O fl H 

> a <u cd 

h<h k aas 

h O 3 0) 

o pm cn *•*) 



4J >sUi G C/> -H — o <D 

^ h w o r 

O U fl <U H U 

CL tH *J 00 4J CO 

CD CO tH CO CO CD 

at -rt a c n n 

i- 3 co -h a> o 

cr c/i eg u h 

U Mr] 



a) 4) 

rH _1 



n h u a 

m a o 

rH CO CD iH 

CD CD *a 



09 



4J a • CD CD to 

4 0) H T) V Q O 

CD 3 Ptf £ cfl a. 

Vj U £i 00 £ n 

CD O O C 5 O -H 

*J ft. 3 CD CO U a 

iH H£ 3 

< CJ (A Pu 



143 



CO CD 



O U U U CD CO 

O CD CD CD JZ -H 

£ d u » u£ 

CJ CD to CD 3 

CO O 3 CO < 



§ a 



32 Boutwell School 

33 Buzzell School 
35 Center School 

37 Glen Rd. School 

38 High School 

41 Mildred Rogers School 

42 North Intermediate 

School 

43 West School 

44 Swain School 

46 Walker School 

47 West Intermediate School 

48 West School 

49 Shawsheen School 
51 Whitefield School 

53 Wildwood School 

54 Woburn Street School 

121 Main & Church Sts. 

122 Main & Middlesex Ave. 

1222 Carr Fastener 

1223 Wilmington Builders 

123 Main & Clark Sts. 

124 Washington Ave. 

125 Wilmington Plaza 

126 Main St. & Bridge Lane 

127 Brand Ave. & Wiser St 

128 Baker St. & Taplin Ave. 

129 Phillips Ave. & Wiser St. 

131 Hobson Ave. & Miles St. 

132 Main St. & 

Massachusetts Ave. 

133 Massachusetts Ave. & 

River St. 

134 Main & Harnden Sts. 

135 St. Dorothy's Church 

136 Veranda Ave. 

137 Main St & Grove Ave. 

138 Grove & Wild Aves. 

139 Grove Ave. & Burnap St. 

141 Grove Ave. & Lake St. 

142 Main St. & Glen Rd. 

143 Main & Lake Sts. 

144 Lake St. & Warren Rd. 

146 Main & Davis Sts. 

147 Fairfield Ave. 

148 Marjorie Rd. 

149 Main St. at Tewksbury 

Line 

211 Burlington & Floradale 

Aves 

2111 Diamond Crystal Salt 

Company 

2112 Sweetheart Plastic Corp. 

212 Burlington Ave. & 

Harris St. 

213 Cedar St. & Burt Rd. 

214 Deming Way (Old Age 

Housing) 

215 Burlington Ave. & 

Chestnut St. 

216 Chestnut St. & 

Butters Row 

217 Chestnut St. & Mill Rd. 

218 Chestnut St. & 

Hillside Way 

219 Hillside Way at 

Burlington Line 

221 Chestnut St. near 

Golf Club 

222 Chestnut St. at Woburn 

Line 

223 Marion & Day Sts. 

224 Marion & Clifton Sts. 

225 Marion St. to 

Chestnut St. 

226 Roberts Road 

227 Burlington Ave. & 

Boutwell St. 

228 Boutwell St. & Taft Rd. 

229 Taft & Swain Rds. 

231 Roosevelt Rd. 

232 Burlington Ave. & 

Dell Drive 

233 Burlington Ave. & 

Swain Rd. 

234 Beech St. 

235 Burlington Ave. & 

Forest St. 



236 Burlington Ave. at 

Burlington Line 

237 Forest St. & Congress St. 

238 Forest St. & 

Randolph Rd. 

239 Forest St. & 

Cochrane Rd. 

241 Elwood Rd. 

242 Forest St. & 

Edwards Rd. 

251 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Canal St. 

252 Canal St. & Burt Rd. 

253 Grand St. 

254 Nassau Ave. & 

Dunton Rd. 

255 Shawsheen Ave & 

Carter Lane 

256 Carter Lane 

Norfolk St. 

257 Amherst Rd. 

258 Auburn Ave. 

259 Ferguson Rd. 

261 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Aldrich Rd. 
262Aldrich Rd & 

Hardin St. 

263 Aldrich Rd. & 

Kendall St 

264 Aldrich Rd & 

Boutwell St. 

265 Aldrich Rd & Forest St. 

266 Winston Ave. 

267 Aldrich Rd. at 

Billerica Line 

268 Shawsheen Ave near 

Cranberry Bog 

269 Wilton Drive 

271 Shawsheen Ave $ 
Bond St. 

273 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Hopkins St. 

274 Hopkins & Columbia 

Streets 

275 Hopkins & Dorchester 

Streets 

276 Hopkins St. at 

Billerica Line 

277 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Nichols St. 

278 Nichols St. & 

Fairmeadow Rd. 

279 Fairmeadow & 

Jere Rds. 

281 Nichols St. at 

Billerica Line 

282 Shawsheen Ave. at 

Billerica Line 

31 1 Main St. & Dublin Ave. 

312 Main& Lowell Sts 
3121 Hayden Mica Co. 

313 Main St. & Butters Row 

314 Main St. at Town Park 
3142 Brewsters 

315 Main & Eames Sts. 

316 Eames St. 

3132 Polyvinyl Chemical 

3161 J. W. Greer Co. 

3162 National Polychemical 

Co., Inc. 

3163 Dragon Cement Co. 

3164 JBF Scientific, Jewell 

Drive 

3165 Harwich Chemical, 
Jewell Drive 

3166 Altron, Industrial & 

Progress Way 

31 7 Cook Ave. 

3171 Raffi & Swanson 

318 Main St. at Woburn Line 

321 Lowell & Parker Sts. 
3211 Parker & Laurel Sts. 

322 Parker & Blackstone Sts. 
3223 Allen Park Drive 

3222 Allen Park & Sheldon Sts. 

323 Lowell & Cross Sts. 

324 Lowell & Bay Sts. 



3241 Avco Corp. 

325 Lowell & Woburn Sts. 

326 Woburn & Elm Sts. 
3261 Stepan Chemical 

327 Woburn St. & 

Brentwood Ave 

328 Woburn St & 

Morse Ave. 

329 Woburn & Eames Sts. 
J291 Terrell Corp. 

3292 Jeffrey Chemical 

3293 NAPA 

3294 Ritter Trucking 

3295 Analog Devices 

331 Woburn St & 

Industrial Way 

3313 Commodity Warehouse 

3314 Market Forge 

331 5 Smithcraft 

3316 Crusader Paper Co. 
3318 Compugraphic 

332 Strout Ave. 

333 Lowell St. & 

Woodland Rd. 

334 Lowell & West Sts 

335 West St &Westdale 

Avenue 
336AyotteSt. & Crest 
Avenue 

337 Nickerson Ave. 

338 West St. & 

Suncrest Ave. 

339 Suncrest Ave. & 

Meadow Lane 

341 West St & Industrial Way 

3411 Compugraphic. 
90 Industrial Way 

3412 Compugraphics 

3413 Scully Signal 
3415 Compugraphic 
3417 ADS 

342 Lowell St., Rte 93 

and Rpading Line 
3423 Avco, Progress Way 

411 Church St., Fire Station 

412 Church & Columbia Sts. 

413 Church & Beacon Sts. 

414 Beacon St. & 

Belmont Ave. 

415 State St. & 

Fairview Ave. 

416 Church & Clark Sts. 

417 Methodist Church 

418 Church St. & 

Thurston Ave. 

419 Church & Adams Sts. 

421 Chandler& Kelley Rds. 

422 Adams St. Ext. 

423 Church St. & 

Middlesex Ave. 
4231 New Library 
4232 Baptist Church 

424 Middlesex Ave. & 

Adelaide St. 

425 Middlesex Ave. & 

Clark St. 

426 Clark St. & 

Railroad Ave. 

427 Middlesex Ave. & 

Adams St 

428 St. Thomas' Church 
4281 Villanova Hall 

429 Middlesex Ave. & 

School St. 

431 School St & Drury Lane 

432 Drury Lane & Loumac Rd. 

433 Powderhouse Circle 

434 Middlesex Ave. & 

Wildwood St. 

435 Wildwood St. near 

Cemetery 

436 Wildwood St near 

Vets Housing 

437 Wildwood & Woburn 

Streets 

438 Wing Rd. 

511 Middlesex Ave. & 
Glen Rd. 



512 Glendale Circle- 

513 Glen Rd. & 

Lawrence St 

514 Lawrence St. & 

Lawrence Ct. 

515 Lawrence St. & 

Hamlin Lane 

516 Glen Rd at 

R.R. Crossing 

517 Glen Rd. & Fay St. 

518 Glen Rd. & King St. 

519 King St & Garden 

Ave. 

521 King& KilbySts. 

522 King & Broad Sts. 

523 Glen Rd. & Cypress St. 

524 Glen Rd. & Brattle St. 

525 Glen Rd. & Harnden St. 

526 Glen & Miller Rds. 

527 Faulkner & Beeching 

Aves. 

528 Faulkner & Allston 

Aves 

529 Jones Ave. 

531 Town Hall 

532 Congregational Church 

533 Middlesex Ave. & 

Federal St. 

534 Federal & Concord Streets 

535 Federal & Grant Sts. 

536 Federal 4 Wilson Sts. 

537 Federal & Lincoln Sts. 

538 Federal & Pershing Sts. 

539 Federal & Library Sts. 

541 Federal & Woburn Sts. 

542 Woburn & West Sts 

543 West & Kilmarnock Sts. 

545 Woburn St. at 

R.R. Crossing 

546 Concord & Woburn Sts. 
5461 Dymo Graphics Systems 

547 Concord St. at Rte. 93 

5471 Compugraphics, Concord 

St. 

5472 Dynamics Research 

5474 General Electric 

5475 Volkswagen 

5476 Prudential, Fordham Rd. 

5477 Dupont, Fordham Road 

5478 Machinist for 

Electronics 

5479 Barbo 

548 Concord St at North 

Reading Line 

549 Woburn St. at 281 

551 Middlesex & Mystic 

Aves 

5511 Dymo Graphics Systems 

5512 Photon, Inc. 

5513 D F Munroe Paper Co 
5514Waltham Door& 

Window Co. 

552 Middlesex Ave. & Shady 

Lane Drive 
5521 Mytron Inc. 

553 Shady Lane Drive & 

Oakdale Rd. 

554 Shady Lane Drive & 

Birchwood Rd. 

555 Shady Lane Drive & 

Sprucewood Rd. 

556 Pinewood & Oakdale 

Roads 

557 Birchwood & Judith Rds. 

558 Shady Lane Drive & 

Lawrence St. 

611 No. Wilmington 

Shopping Center 

612 Middlesex Ave. & 

North St. 

613 North St. & 

Pineridge Rd. 

614 North St. & Marcia Rd. 

615 Middlesex Ave. & 

High St. 

616 Linda & Carolyn Rds 

617 High & Woburn Sts. 

618 Woburn & Park Sts. 



619 Park St. & Gowing Rd. 

621 Gowing & Marcus Rds 

622 Park St. at No Reading 

Line 

623 Middlesex Ave & 

Salem St. 

624 Arlene& Catherine 

Aves 

625 Barbara & Dorothy 

Aves 

626 Salem St at 

R.R. Crossing 

627 Salem & Cunningham 

Streets 

628 Salem St. & 

McDonald Rd. 

629 McDonald Rd. to End 

631 Royal St. 

632 Salem St at Tewksbury 

Line 

633 Salem & Baliardvale 

Streets 

634 Baliardvale St. at 

Rte. 125 
6341 Compugraphic. Baliardvale St 

635 Baliardvale St at 

No 211 

6351 Charles River Breeding 

6352 Georgia Pacific 

636 Baliardvale St. at 

No 326 

637 Baliardvale St at Andover 

Line 

638 Salem St. at Rte 93 

639 Salem & Woburn Sts. 

641 Woburn St & 

Hathaway Rd. 

642 Hawthorne Rd 

643 Hathaway & 

Pilling Rd 

644 Hathaway & Gunderson 

Roads 

645 Salem St. & Thrush Rd 

646 Thrush Rd I 

Marie Drive 

647 Salem St at North 

Reading Line 
6451 Wilmington Regional 
Health Center 

6471 Cronin's Pit 

6472 Benevento's Pit 

648 Woburn & Andover 

Streets 

6481 Pumping Station 

(Water Dept.) 

6482 Ainsworth Road 

6483 Highway Dept 

649 Andover St & Rte 125 

651 Andover St at No. 319 

652 Andover St. at Andover 

Line 

SPECIAL SIGNALS 

1 Test 

2 All out (test 9 a m & 

9 p.m.) 

3 Special Call 

4 Brush Fire 

5 Police Call 
666 Civil Defense 

7 Boy Scouts 

22 No School (6:30 a m.. 
7:00 a.m.) 

2 Followed by 3 rounds of 

box - second alarm 

3 Fol lowed by 3 rounds of 

box - general alarm 

MUTUAL AID 
(two rounds only) 

8 Out of Town 

81 To Andover 

82 To Billerica 

83 To Burlington 

84 To Lowell 

85 To No. Reading 

86 To Reading 

87 To Tewksbury 

88 To Woburn 



FIRE — AMBULANCE 
EMERGENCY: 658-3200 

658-3346 



POLICE 
EMERGENCY: 658-3331 

658-5071 
658-5072 
935-5966 



TOWN HALL 
658-331 1 
935-5596 



TOWN HALL ANNEX 
657-7511 

NO SCHOOL 658-9845 



The Land 



Some Woburn farmers came to worship God 
In swampy country near the Land of Nod. 
The Land of Goshen, as it first was named, 
The sources of the Ipswich River claimed - 
A marsh inhabited by wolves and bears, 
Jaquiths and Hamdens, porcupines and hares. 
Quagmires and sink holes near the sluggish streams 
Made hazardous the use of carts and teams, 
So barefoot youngsters earned a scanty pay 
By helping deacons pole their meadow hay. 
Then pit -sawed planks, and broadaxe -squared beams 
Made homes for Jaquiths, Carters, Bucks and Eames. 
A yeoman who was any good at all 
Would, in a day, lay up a rod of wall. 
The stones he used were always close at hand, 
And, gathered up, exposed a patch of land. 
By spring, another crop would come to light. 
Who farms New England isn't very bright. 
But rocks and pines were not the only crops; 
The soil was good, the thirsty found, for hops. 
The hardy settlers, at that early date 
Had hides mosquitos couldn't penetrate, 
And old time blacksmiths, among other things 
Were kept employed in sharpening their stings. 
A witchcraft judge once owned the ancient mill 
Whose dam impounds the sluggish waters still; 
And Cotton Mather rode the winding trail 
Which now is Woburn Street, so goes the tale. 
Some ragged youngsters, where the woods were dense 
Supplied him with a captive audience. 
Later, he thought his sermon opportune 
Since red men scalped them in the planters' moon. 
A tomahawk inserted in the pate 
At least ensures an open minded state. 

b 1 5} A From "Stratton Pond And Other Verses" 

by Philip B. Buzz ell 



Written for the occasion of Wilmington' s two hundred and twenty -fifth 
birthday. 



WILMINGTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 



3 2136 00199 8370 



For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room